Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Andy G's Avatar
    Andy G Guest

    Default sounds of silence Astronomer



    Hi all,

    has anyone been on the sounds of silence dinner at Ayers Rock (Uluru) in
    Australia where they have the resident astronomer?

    If you have what was the experience like?

    Cheers

    Andy



  2. #2
    Bob's Avatar
    Bob Guest

    Default sounds of silence Astronomer


    "Andy G" <astronomer1@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
    newsT9th.45387$RL5.40804@newsfe2-gui.ntli.net...
    Hi Andy,

    I attended one of these in August 2002. I joined a group of people
    meeting at sunset and we were 'serenaded' by a bloke playing a digeridoo.
    Uluru was visible in the distance. The meal gave us the opportunity to try
    crocodile, kangaroo, and emu. There was also lamb on the menu for those that
    felt less adventurous. By the time the meal was finished the sky was ablaze
    with light -absolutely stunning.

    An amatuer astronomer armed with a pointing torch gave us a tour of the
    night sky and singled out, in particular, scorpius and libra that were
    overhead. There were a number of small portable telescopes set out where we
    could view a number of well known objects. I particularly remember 'The
    Jewel Box'.

    I asked to be directed towards the Magalenic Clouds which I had trouble
    seeing ( my laser surgery may have reduced my ability to see objects with
    particularly low contrast). The sight of an extremely clear 'Milky Way' made
    the whole experience for me, a most memorable part of my holiday. I would
    certainly recommend this for anyone with an interest in Astronomy.

    Bob



  3. #3
    Andy G's Avatar
    Andy G Guest

    Default sounds of silence Astronomer


    Thanks for the info Bob that's great news I cant wait!.

    This is just one of the astro-things on my trip and one of the things I will
    be doing whilst away.

    First trip is to the Hong Kong Space Centre en route, then over to Oz where
    I have arranged with the pro astronomers to visit AAT at Sidings for a
    behind the scenes tour and then over to meet a contact at Parkes.

    Sydney Observatory next before heading off to Hawaii for 7 days. Meeting the
    astronomy team at Imiloa on Big Island before a trip up Mauna Kea. Lastly
    flying to LA en route back to the UK and a quick trip to Griffith
    Observatory before home, so should be good!

    A new societies lecture will be on offer soon!

    Cheers for your feedback

    Andy

    "Bob" <bob.leon@tiscali.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:51n005F1ksiefU1@mid.individual.net...



  4. #4
    oriel36's Avatar
    oriel36 Guest

    Default sounds of silence Astronomer


    Bob wrote:

    If there was an astronomer there he would have pointed out the
    difference between the color transition at the orbital/solar radiation
    boundary and how to experience the color change from the point of view
    of a rotating Earth -

    http://www.io.com/~iareth/20021117eUluruSunsetWeb.jpg

    http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ima..._iss002_c1.jpg




    Constellation astronomy is beautiful in its own right as a reminder of
    the ancient ancestors who split the sky into divisions for timekeeping
    purposes.They had plenty of wisdom to create the daily cycle as a
    seperate system ,only the silly 17th century guys turned constellation
    geometry into a calendrically driven system moixed up with crude
    notions of the daily cycle.

    In short,the natural views of the color transition and the great cycles
    which exist as you look into the celestial arena do not match the
    sub-geocentric views of your guide.The incredible scenery and the
    natural motions of the Earth which compliment each other dissolve into
    a celestial sphere spectacle with no pretense to the contrary -

    http://www.opencourse.info/astronomy...phere_anim.gif






    You are in the Milky Way,you particpate in all its cycles but for some
    reason you are mesmerised by constellational geometry which excludes
    the appreciation of our galactic orbital motion.Like a creature who has
    no feel for its surroundings,even though it provides all the clues for
    what is occuring,the extremely beautiful events wither to nothing more
    than a consumerist indulgence.


  5. #5
    Paul Clark's Avatar
    Paul Clark Guest

    Default sounds of silence Astronomer

    Mmm, sounds great. Turning green.

    Hope its over a new moon! The southern skies are magic!!!

    Bon voyage!
    Paul
    "Andy G" <astronomer1@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
    news:IJtth.75652$z01.28219@newsfe3-gui.ntli.net...


  6. #6
    Andy G's Avatar
    Andy G Guest

    Default sounds of silence Astronomer

    Should be great, and wont be long now.

    I remember the Skies when I was in Kenya being awesome too so should be good
    down under and in Hawaii.

    All the best

    Andy



    "Paul Clark" <dr.clark@dial.pipex.com> wrote in message
    news:E_ydnRFxXuz49yvYRVnytgA@pipex.net...



  7. #7
    Martin Brown's Avatar
    Martin Brown Guest

    Default sounds of silence Astronomer


    Andy G wrote:


    I didn't do that deal. But did do sunset and sunrise at the rock to
    watch the colours change - some of the obvious venues are *very*
    touristy with many coach loads of onlookers BBQ & boozing, but the
    place is big so you don't have to go far to be well off the beaten
    track. Carry plenty of water if you are out walking round it in the
    daytime.

    When I visited there was a chance to go to a dark site with a 10" LX200
    and some other misc kit to look at the obvious deep sky objects. I was
    unlucky and got the one night in 100 with major thunderstorms passing
    through, but after discovering that I was a keen amateur the guy took
    me out anyway despite the limited chance to see things. Most of the
    larger hotels have flyers for things ranging from helicopter flights to
    ballooning and even amateur astronomy. Show that you know something
    about using the kit and you may find yourself in charge of a scope.

    The sky is dazzlingly bright with unfamiliar stars, and Orion is doing
    a handstand. Well worth taking a decent sized pair of binoculars or
    spotting scope with you for the stars and the wildlife. Ditto a camera
    - you would not believe how red the soil is!!!

    Eating five breakfasts in a row on the way out to Oz can be a bit
    tedious. Hope you have a great time.

    Regards,
    Martin Brown


  8. #8
    Andy G's Avatar
    Andy G Guest

    Default sounds of silence Astronomer

    I am looking forward to the flights out there as going Business Class so
    should at least get some sleep to ward of some lag as we have the lay flat
    beds and were upstairs where hopefully it will be a bit quieter. Were flying
    with BA & Qantas.



    "Martin Brown" <|||newspam|||@nezumi.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:1169586672.462569.144110@m58g2000cwm.googlegr oups.com...



 

 

Similar Threads

  1. The Sounds of Silence
    By DizzyGazer in forum Off Topic Forum
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 05-18-2009, 06:11 AM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 05-12-2008, 04:38 AM
  3. Sounds of silence... 'The Sopranos' in Memoriam
    By Nomen Nescio in forum Amateur Astronomy Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-16-2007, 09:10 PM
  4. Sounds of silence... 'The Sopranos' in Memoriam
    By Nomen Nescio in forum Amateur Astronomy Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-16-2007, 08:00 PM
  5. Sounds of silence... 'The Sopranos' in Memoriam
    By Nomen Nescio in forum Amateur Astronomy Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-16-2007, 05:30 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.0
Powered by vBulletin®
All times are GMT. The time now is 04:16 PM.