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Thread: Milky Way

  1. #1
    Martin Brown's Avatar
    Martin Brown Guest

    Default Milky Way



    In message <bkrlk2$k2p$1@hercules.btinternet.com>, "Steve Warren @ The
    UK Speedtrap Guide" <findemailaddythe@atthe.site> writes

    You are on a bit of a sticky wicket in the midlands, but as a rough rule
    of thumb the milky way becomes easily visible by eye once you are in
    countryside more than 10 miles away from the edge of the nearest large
    town or city.

    Trouble is that in more congested parts that leaves you nowhere to go.

    Provided you are in a region with low pressure sodium lights you can
    always filter against them and extend the exposure a bit. Even so it is
    still worth starting out with the darkest skies you can find.

    Regards,
    --
    Martin Brown

  2. #2
    Martin Frey's Avatar
    Martin Frey Guest

    Default Milky Way

    Martin Brown <news@nezumi.demon.co.uk> wrote:


    And it can be very variable between one apparently dark night and
    another - it was startlingly clear on August 30th when a group of us
    got together for a look at Mars. It depends on transparency - how much
    light is absorbed or scattered by water vapour that may not be visible
    as mist or cloud but it's still there doing the damage.

    And watch out for the Moon - its light can blank out an awful lot of
    sky and spoil your eyes adapting to the dark. I think that's half the
    problem with light pollution - your eyes never settle down properly.
    So screening yourself from light sources and waiting 20 minutes can
    make a big difference.

    But cowering behind your beach screen thingy at midnight in a garden
    lit up by streetlights can make quite a difference to what your
    neighbours think.

    Cheers

    Martin

    --------------
    Martin Frey
    N 51 02 E 0 47
    --------------

  3. #3
    Steve Warren @ The UK Speedtrap Guide's Avatar
    Steve Warren @ The UK Speedtrap Guide Guest

    Default Milky Way

    Many thanks for the pointers, I am working out the places to visit when I
    get my new scope, light pollution here is quite bad and I intend to work on
    Astrophotography so the less I can find the better. I will use a filter here
    but would prefer not to.
    Steve

    --
    "The UK SpeedTrap Guide" @ http://www.ukspeedtraps.co.uk
    "The UK Weather Guide" @ http://www.ukstorms.com



  4. #4
    Martin Brown's Avatar
    Martin Brown Guest

    Default Milky Way

    In message <jei3nv48r5ti3fhv0inoq3cvmnl15kk2mr@4ax.com>, Martin Frey
    <martinfrey@snipclara.co.uk> writes

    Water vapour that hasn't condensed does no real harm in the visible.

    In fact some of the very clearest nights are immediately after a cold
    front has passed and the air has been swept clean of dust and smoke
    particles by heavy rain. The air is then cold, damp and very close to
    dew point but until it condenses and forms mist is fantastically clear.

    The worst light scattering is usually from smoke and dust - unless it is
    going misty.


    Any moon light will wipe out the milky way.

    Regards,
    --
    Martin Brown

  5. #5
    Martin Frey's Avatar
    Martin Frey Guest

    Default Milky Way

    Martin Brown <news@nezumi.demon.co.uk> wrote:


    My fault - I meant condensed but not visibly obvious. If it's a
    reasonably dark night it can be very hard to be sure whether there is
    thin cloud or not if you are not sure what stars you ought to see if
    its reasonably clear. Those nights when it is really dark and clear
    are so rare and it is a shock to find the number of stars seems to be
    100s of times more thant you could see on an ordinary clear dark
    night.


    Agreed - that going misty is a mistiness that is very hard to see but
    deducible from what you can't see...


    Depends on the water and dust etc. If it is a really clear clean
    mist-free night the Moon tends not to light up the sky and the Milky
    Way can be seen fairly easily. Most of the time there's enough mist
    etc to deflect moonlight at you from all over the sky.

    There were a couple of nights round the last full Moon when the Moon
    seemed startlingly bright (this sad person actually got a newspaper to
    prove that he could read it easily.) But the stars were above average
    visible - and the Milky Way was visible round Cassiopeia. A similar
    seeming night at half Moon and I could hardly see Cass at all, never
    mind the Milky Way.

    Cheers

    Martin

    --------------
    Martin Frey
    N 51 02 E 0 47
    --------------

 

 

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