Results 1 to 6 of 6
Like Tree4Likes
  • 2 Post By *Charles*
  • 2 Post By AR6

Thread: SCT vs Newtonian for Astrophotography

  1. #1
    keith-d's Avatar
    keith-d is offline White Dwarf
    Points: 3,968, Level: 42
    Level completed: 12%, Points required for next Level: 132
    Overall activity: 0%
    Achievements:
    2 Posts Achievement20 Posts Achievement!365 Days+ Registered Achievement!First 1000 Experience Points750 Days+ Registered Achievement!
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    42
    Points
    3,968
    Level
    42
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 10x 9 Posts

    Default SCT vs Newtonian for Astrophotography



    I've been looking at getting the Celestron Advanced VX mount, and am debating whether to grab their 6" Newtonian for the extra $100. As of now, I only have an old Celestron 8" SCT to work with, and I am really trying to do AP with a DSLR.

    I'm assuming the 6" Newt would give me a greater FOV at prime focus, right?
    Last edited by KathyNS; 03-18-2015 at 07:04 PM. Reason: for context after splitting from old thread
    Scopes: Celestron 8" SCT, Sky-Watcher 80mm ED
    Cameras: stock Canon EOS 60D and Baader modified Canon EOS 450D
    Mount: Celestron AVX
    Autoguiding: 60mm refractor and Meade DSI gen. 1, PHD

  2. #2
    KathyNS's Avatar
    KathyNS is online now Super Moderator
    Points: 173,785, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 65.0%
    Achievements:
    200+ Posts Achievement!Ghost Achievement! Averaging 5+ posts a day!First 1000 Experience Points400+ Posts AchievementGot three Friends
    Awards:
    Reply Award
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Nova Scotia
    Posts
    25,219
    Points
    173,785
    Level
    100
    Thanks
    6,661
    Thanked 14,992x 9,547 Posts
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default Re: SCT vs Newtonian for Astrophotography

    Yes, a Newtonian will give a wider FOV due to the shorter focal length. It will also give you much shorter exposure times, or, conversely, way more photons in the same exposure time.

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.


    DSO AP:
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    Newtonian Astrograph; ATIK 383L+; EFW2 filter wheel; Astrodon Ha,LRGB filters; KWIQ/QHY5 guide
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    ; Planetary AP: Celestron C-11; ZWO ASI120MC; Portable: Celestron C-8 on
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    pro; C-90 on wedge; 20x80 binos; Etc: Canon 350D; Various EPs, etc. Obs: 8' Exploradome;
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    (pier);
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    .

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.

  3. #3
    *Charles*'s Avatar
    *Charles* is offline Banned
    Points: 92, Level: 1
    Level completed: 84%, Points required for next Level: 8
    Overall activity: 0%
    Achievements:
    2 Posts Achievement20 Posts Achievement!
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    12
    Points
    92
    Level
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post

    Default Re: SCT vs Newtonian for Astrophotography

    This thread is eerily similar to what I wanted my first post to be, but as It concerns a parallel but different topic I will make another.

    To answer the OP, I would suggest there is no easy answer to this question. Having used a lot of Dob tho, I would really like to have a SCT as well. There are so many different variables at work here. Do you want ease of use? Will it be set up in an observatory? I require a comprehensive list of your viewing environment and what it is you want to observe, narrow or wide view, before even beginning to hazard an answer.

    My first post on this forum yay.
    laney50w and JohnP_1 like this.

  4. #4
    AR6's Avatar
    AR6
    AR6 is offline Bright Giants
    Points: 1,709, Level: 25
    Level completed: 9%, Points required for next Level: 91
    Overall activity: 0%
    Achievements:
    2 Posts Achievement5 Threads Achievement!20 Posts Achievement!50 Posts Achievement!200+ Posts Achievement!
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    267
    Points
    1,709
    Level
    25
    Thanks
    8
    Thanked 82x 75 Posts

    Default Re: SCT vs Newtonian for Astrophotography

    I have a 6" f/5 newtonian, a 6" f/8 refractor, an 8" f/6 newtonian and an 8" f/10 SCT.

    I'm just getting rolling with the SCT, but my thoughts are that there are pros and cons with all of them:

    The 6" newt is comparatively short, light and easy to mount with a nice field of view. However it has less resolution than a 6" refractor or the 8" reflectors, as well as a lot less light gathering capability than the 8" telescopes.

    The 6" refractor has great resolution for the aperture, but it's a bit of a beast to mount and the false color is an issue in AP.

    The 8" newt offers a better field of view than the 8" SCT but it's large and poses some significant stability challenges even on an Atlas mount once you load it up with camera, guide scope, etc.

    I'm just getting familiar with the 8" SCT, but so far it appear to have a lot to offer. At f/10 it offers some significant advantages in lunar and planetary photography - giving me the image scale of a longer focal length refractor with the light gathering and true color virtues of a reflector. With an f/6.3 focal reducer I can also get the wider field of view - with some intervening lenses and some coma way out on the extreme edge of the field, at least visually. I still haven't assessed how much of that actually shows on the camera sensor yet. It also has the advantage of being easy to transport and it places a lot less strain on the mount and is much less affected by wind.

    It's rapidly moving up to the position where if I could only have a single telescope, it would probably be the one.
    tomwall and JML like this.
    Meade 203mm ACF SCT with Starlight Feather Touch focuser

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    203mm f/6 Newtonian with Moonlite focuser
    Meade 152mm f/8 achromatic refractor with Moonlite focuser
    Atlas EQ-G mount, 8" extension
    Meade LXD 75
    Canon T3i
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.

    Nikon D50

  5. #5
    JohnP_1's Avatar
    JohnP_1 is offline HYPER GIANT
    Points: 44,229, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 26.0%
    Achievements:
    2 Posts Achievement365 Days+ Registered Achievement!20 Posts Achievement!Gallery Achievement!Album Achievement!
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Mystic, CT
    Posts
    4,358
    Points
    44,229
    Level
    100
    Thanks
    2,197
    Thanked 1,765x 1,630 Posts
    Blog Entries
    55

    Default Re: SCT vs Newtonian for Astrophotography

    Your 8 inch SCT has great potential paired with the AVX mount and a DSLR. That is what I use currently. You would need a field flattener/corrector lens for AP. (I recommend the Starizona corrector). If your budget allows for a new scope, I would consider a high quality refractor to compliment the 8 inch SCT. One that has my eye is, Explore Scientific AR102 102mm f/6.5 Air-Spaced Doublet Achromat Refractor Telescope

    You would need a field flattener with nearly all refractors as well. These two would allow you the pros of a large FOV for the occasions you want it, and the flexibility that the SCT provides. The SCT type OTA's provide a significantly greater back focus compared to Newtonians from what I've read. This can be handy with the DSLR and anything you might put in the optical path.

    Also, one of the best investments you can make is to have your DSLR professionally modified for astrophotography. It will greatly improves its responsiveness to hydrogen alpha and beta light.

    The Eagle's Nest - Bortle 4-5 sky - scopes: Celestron C8 SCT w/MOTOFOCUS; ES ED102 APO CF MoonLite w/auto focus! FR/FF(s): Starizona SCT Corrector; Stellarvue 0.8 FR/FF; Explore Scientific 1.0 FF Filters: 1.25 inch - Orion Ha (1.25in), 2 inch - UHC, polarizer, Orion Sky Glow, Astronomik CLS-CCD Mount: Celestron AVX Cameras: Canon 60d (modded); Atik 383L+ OSC Guiding: Olivon OAG; ZWO ASI120MM; QHY QHY5-II Mono

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to JohnP_1 For This Useful Post:

    tomwall (05-13-2015)

  7. #6
    keith-d's Avatar
    keith-d is offline White Dwarf
    Points: 3,968, Level: 42
    Level completed: 12%, Points required for next Level: 132
    Overall activity: 0%
    Achievements:
    2 Posts Achievement20 Posts Achievement!365 Days+ Registered Achievement!First 1000 Experience Points750 Days+ Registered Achievement!
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    42
    Points
    3,968
    Level
    42
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 10x 9 Posts

    Default Re: SCT vs Newtonian for Astrophotography

    Thanks for all the great advice! I learned how to collimate the 8" SCT, and got some really nice planetary images of Jupiter and Saturn, even on the wobbly old wooden-legged motorized fork mount.

    Lately, I've been going more towards the Atlas or Celestron CGEM mount for guiding my SCT. Paired with a smallish guide scope that can double as a wide field seems the best route from what I have gathered. I'd like to start imaging with the smaller scope to hone my skills before getting serious with the SCT, anyways. As with every good idea, though, comes a budget limit, so this will definitely be a slow work in progress.

    I haven't seen a clear sky in over a month, anyways, so it's not like I should be in any hurry.
    Scopes: Celestron 8" SCT, Sky-Watcher 80mm ED
    Cameras: stock Canon EOS 60D and Baader modified Canon EOS 450D
    Mount: Celestron AVX
    Autoguiding: 60mm refractor and Meade DSI gen. 1, PHD

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. SCT vs Newtonian for Astrophotography
    By Zxeon in forum Telescope Forums
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 06-05-2013, 05:03 PM
  2. Newtonian vs Refractor for Astrophotography
    By Zxeon in forum Astronomy Beginners Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-22-2013, 04:58 AM
  3. New scope for astrophotography: Meade ACF vs Sky-Watcher newtonian
    By saule in forum Astronomy Beginners Forum
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-27-2012, 01:40 AM
  4. Best Astrophotography photo's C6-SCT CG5 or an 8" Newtonian LX80?
    By slalles in forum Astronomy Beginners Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-20-2012, 06:54 AM
  5. astrophotography in f/8 newtonian
    By Patrick in forum Amateur Astronomy Forum
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 10-03-2003, 11:29 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.0
Powered by vBulletin®
All times are GMT. The time now is 12:35 AM.