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    Default Suppose an astronaut working on the Hubble telescope?



    got himself completely loose of the shuttle and threw away a 2 kg hammer at 2 m/s. Could the astronaut remain at rest? If not, how fast would he be moving? How could he stop himself from drifting away?

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    Your question is kind of confusing. But, I will explain the physics here. Say the astronaut begins moving at 2m/s away from the shuttle and weighs 100kg. With the kinetic energy equation KE=mv^2, the total energy would be 400 Kg*(M^2/s^2) which equals 400 joules. To make the astronaut stop, the energy released in the direction opposite of the movement needs to be equal to 400 joules. So, say you had a 2kg hammer and wanted the astronaut to stop, with the same equation, moving things around you get sqrt(KE/m)=v where sqrt is the square root. So, you get sqrt((400joules)/(2kg))=14.14m/s. That means the astronaut needs to throw the hammer 14.14 m/s to stop himself from floating away. So make himself to back towards the shuttle, he has to throw the hammer faster than 14.14m/s.

 

 

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