Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    dabliss74's Avatar
    dabliss74 Guest

    Default If we had a telescope big enough to see 15 billion light years away.....?



    and the big bang was the origin of our universe, then wouldn't we be able to see our planet forming?















    OK thanks for all the no's...so tell me why not....if you look at the sun and there is a 7 light minute difference, and if we could see a planet 30,000,000 light yrs away it'd be 30,000,000 years old (not real time) then why wouldnt we be able to see our planet forming...just as if an intelligent species was 65,000,000 light years away looking for intelligent life present day and they could actually see the life on the planet, they would see dinosaurs, not us, so why wouldn't we be able to see the origins of our planet if we had a telescope strong enough to see 15 billion light years....or what I am saying is why wouldnt we see the big bang if we pointed the telescope in the right direction? I know this gets pretty deep into physics and red shift blue shift stuff, but all I am asking is...is it possible to see the big bang?

  2. #2
    The Mysterious One's Avatar
    The Mysterious One Guest

    Default

    No because you would be standing on our planet looking out with your super duper telescope stupid! Think about it! You big dummy!

  3. #3
    dmck105's Avatar
    dmck105 is offline Junior Member
    Points: 8,503, Level: 64
    Level completed: 18%, Points required for next Level: 247
    Overall activity: 0%
    Achievements:
    First 1000 Experience Points365 Days+ Registered Achievement!750 Days+ Registered Achievement!1000 Days+ Registered Achievement!3 Years + Achievement
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    1
    Points
    8,503
    Level
    64
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0x 0 Posts

    Default

    Ridiculous . your question makes no sense. your telescope seeing 15 billion light years away would not allow you to see back in time. first off why would you need to look so far away to see in the past anyway. you heard looking to the stars is like looking to the past. that meant most of the stars we see are no longer shining. but we can still see there.

  4. #4
    John S's Avatar
    John S is offline Junior Member
    Points: 8,637, Level: 64
    Level completed: 63%, Points required for next Level: 113
    Overall activity: 0%
    Achievements:
    First 1000 Experience Points365 Days+ Registered Achievement!750 Days+ Registered Achievement!2 Posts Achievement1000 Days+ Registered Achievement!
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    8
    Points
    8,637
    Level
    64
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0x 0 Posts

    Default

    The question is interesting, because it has no answer!

  5. #5
    mathematician's Avatar
    mathematician is offline Junior Member
    Points: 8,505, Level: 64
    Level completed: 19%, Points required for next Level: 245
    Overall activity: 0%
    Achievements:
    First 1000 Experience Points365 Days+ Registered Achievement!750 Days+ Registered Achievement!2 Posts Achievement1000 Days+ Registered Achievement!
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3
    Points
    8,505
    Level
    64
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0x 0 Posts

    Default

    No. Even if we could see back that far, we would be looking at things far enough away that light had to take that long to get here (working against the expansion, of course). The earth formed about 5 billion years ago, by the way.

  6. #6
    josh m's Avatar
    josh m is offline Junior Member
    Points: 8,550, Level: 64
    Level completed: 34%, Points required for next Level: 200
    Overall activity: 0%
    Achievements:
    First 1000 Experience Points365 Days+ Registered Achievement!750 Days+ Registered Achievement!2 Posts Achievement1000 Days+ Registered Achievement!
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    3
    Points
    8,550
    Level
    64
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0x 0 Posts

    Default

    Interesting question. It's true that when you look at a star, you're looking into the past, because the light you're viewing was actually generated long ago. In fact, the place that the light appears is no longer anywhere near the star's actual location, if the star even exists anymore. In effect, the further you look into space, the older the images you are viewing.

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 24
    Last Post: 10-03-2009, 11:12 PM
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-24-2008, 10:31 AM
  3. galaxies more than 11 billion light-years from Earth
    By Charles D. Bohne in forum General Astronomy Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-03-2005, 10:51 AM
  4. Universe 156 Billion Light-Years Wide
    By Klaatu in forum Amateur Astronomy Forum
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 06-03-2004, 07:38 AM
  5. Universe Measured:156 Billion Light-years Wide
    By TheWandererT in forum General Astronomy Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-27-2004, 10:51 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.0
Powered by vBulletin®
All times are GMT. The time now is 09:19 AM.