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Thread: Solar storm etc

  1. #11
    Sally's Avatar
    Sally Guest

    Default Solar storm etc



    "amazure ²°°³" <temporarily-disabled-amazure@islandparadiseproject.com>
    wrote in message news:3fa645a1@news.comindico.com.au...
    If your monitor is an older or cheapo model then it could be affected by
    changes in line voltage, which in turn can be affected by the distribution
    network responding to surges....which may be due to the current geomagnetic
    storms. So yes...there could be a connection <causual, and electrical!>
    Sally



  2. #12
    Anon Imous's Avatar
    Anon Imous Guest

    Default Solar storm etc

    Sally wrote:

    Do you have speakers close to the monitor?


    Any magnetic field will affect TVs and monitors, the obvious question is
    rather where is the threshold of "noticeable". Compare that threshold
    with the maximum fluctuation of earth's magnetic field at your latitude.
    Keep in mind the relatively small surface of your monitor and the small
    angle of the field vector towards your screen.I dont have the values
    handy, but I must agree with David that such effects cannot be visible
    as a direct result of magnetic field fluctuations. Unless (probably) if
    you have a 25" monitor directed toward heavens and you live in northern
    Finland.

    In fact, your case is specific as it suggests the the field can be so
    curved that it can produce patterns on the screen. The curves would, in
    fact appear very smooth on our everyday scales.


    So, you do have speakers near the monitor. Nc, nc...


    Your explanation is correct. Minor fluctuations from the TV itself and
    the environment will eventually randomise the weak residual magnetism.

    Ivan


  3. #13
    Anon Imous's Avatar
    Anon Imous Guest

    Default Solar storm etc

    Sally wrote:

    Do you have speakers close to the monitor?


    Any magnetic field will affect TVs and monitors, the obvious question is
    rather where is the threshold of "noticeable". Compare that threshold
    with the maximum fluctuation of earth's magnetic field at your latitude.
    Keep in mind the relatively small surface of your monitor and the small
    angle of the field vector towards your screen.I dont have the values
    handy, but I must agree with David that such effects cannot be visible
    as a direct result of magnetic field fluctuations. Unless (probably) if
    you have a 25" monitor directed toward heavens and you live in northern
    Finland.

    In fact, your case is specific as it suggests the the field can be so
    curved that it can produce patterns on the screen. The curves would, in
    fact appear very smooth on our everyday scales.


    So, you do have speakers near the monitor. Nc, nc...


    Your explanation is correct. Minor fluctuations from the TV itself and
    the environment will eventually randomise the weak residual magnetism.

    Ivan


  4. #14
    Anon Imous's Avatar
    Anon Imous Guest

    Default Solar storm etc

    Sally wrote:

    Well done Sally. Thats exactly what I thought reading all the posts...

    Ivan


  5. #15
    Sally's Avatar
    Sally Guest

    Default Solar storm etc


    "David Knisely" <KA0CZC@navix.net> wrote in message
    news:98b52353.0311041826.46ad8aec@posting.google.c om...
    I'm sorry David but I must disagree. The 16" monitor I'm using right now
    will show significant misconvergence if it is rotated, this shows up as
    color fringing, especially at the corners. The only way to restore the
    convergence is to do a manual degauss in the new orientation.

    I'm not saying that a geomagnetic storm will have any direct effect. I'm
    just saying that the earth's normal magnetic field is strong enough to
    affect a TV or monitor picture.

    And yes, I agree that nearby speakers and other magnets can also have an
    effect although I'm not aware of any special magnetic screening on any
    domestic TV or monitor that I have seen. Many of them do have an
    electrostatic screen that seems to be some sort of conductive graphite
    coating. On the other hand components that emit magnetic fields, such as
    such as loudspeakers and transformers, often do have casings that function
    as magnetic screens. I think it would be quite difficult to magnetically
    screen a wide angle TV CRT from the front, since all conventional magnetic
    screens that I'm aware of contain iron or iron alloys. Maybe the CRT shadow
    mask could double up as such a screen, which reminds me of ...

    A child waved a magnet in front of our TV set to see the "pretty colors" and
    it took months (dozens of switch-on degausses) for that TV to settle down
    again. I think that in this case it was the shadow mask that got permanently
    magnetised...or at least it got magnetised for a few months.


    Sally



  6. #16
    Sally's Avatar
    Sally Guest

    Default Solar storm etc


    "Anon Imous" <anon@handjobcorporation.com> wrote in message
    news:1068078366.13859.1@ersa.uk.clara.net...
    This isn't disagreement...I'm just fillling in a few details...there is
    specific circuitry built into TV sets and computer monitors that exposes the
    CRT to a fairly strong and rapidly alternating magnetic field that decreases
    to zero over a period of about one second. This circuit is normally
    activated at switch-on and, in some cases, can also be manually activated.
    This same degaussing technique is used on a much larger scale to remove the
    magnetic fields of submarines and military ships.

    In the case of my monitor I can produce color fringes by rotating the
    monitor through 90 degrees *while it is switched on*. The color fringes
    disappear after a degauss. In the case of my monitor there are no nearby
    fixed magnetic fields from speakers etc.

    Sally



  7. #17
    amazure ²°°³'s Avatar
    amazure ²°°³ Guest

    Default Solar storm etc

    "Sally" <sallyx.parkinsx@ntlworld.com> wrote in message news:bob3sr$19gpko$1@ID-40408.news.uni-berlin.de...
    | "amazure ²°°³" <temporarily-disabled-amazure@islandparadiseproject.com>
    | wrote in message news:3fa645a1@news.comindico.com.au...
    | > During the solar storm & the one 2 days or so after, my pc's
    | > monitor kept changing picture width slightly (annoying) !
    | If your monitor is an older or cheapo model then it could be affected by
    | changes in line voltage, which in turn can be affected by the distribution
    | network responding to surges....which may be due to the current geomagnetic
    | storms. So yes...there could be a connection <causual, and electrical!>
    | Sally

    It's an LG 775N, bought about 2 years ago.

    Regards.



  8. #18
    David Knisely's Avatar
    David Knisely Guest

    Default Solar storm etc

    "Sally" <sallyx.parkinsx@ntlworld.com> wrote in message news:<boc1dr$1c7sof$1@ID-40408.news.uni-berlin.de>...


    Again, this sounds like a rather questionable monitor. I have a large
    stereo speaker located 6 inches above the top of my monitor, plus two
    shielded computer speakers to the left and right of the monitor. I
    rotated the monitor (19 inch KDS 'Visual Sensations') just now and the
    image remained sharp and steady. I can turn my TV's in my living room
    and kitchen around and both show no color fringing or changes in
    convergence. It sounds very much like you have a poorly-shielded
    monitor which is being affected by local magnetic fields rather than
    by the relatively weak field of the Earth.



    I'm sorry, but I just can't agree, as the effects you seem to show
    seem excessive to my experience. Again, the field orientation and
    strength of the Earth's field (relative to the random orientation of a
    TV) is so variable that if such effects were seen, they would be
    unable to be compensated for by just the flick of a switch as was
    implied by an earlier poster. Clear skies to you.

    --
    David W. Knisely KA0CZC@navix.net
    Prairie Astronomy Club: http://www.prairieastronomyclub.org
    Hyde Memorial Observatory: http://www.hydeobservatory.info/

    **********************************************
    * Attend the 11th Annual NEBRASKA STAR PARTY *
    * July 18-23, 2004, Merritt Reservoir *
    * http://www.NebraskaStarParty.org *
    **********************************************

  9. #19
    Jan Panteltje's Avatar
    Jan Panteltje Guest

    Default Solar storm etc

    On a sunny day (Wed, 05 Nov 2003 23:20:17 +0000) it happened Anon Imous
    <anon@handjobcorporation.com> wrote in <1068078366.13859.1@ersa.uk.clara.net>:

    No, you are mistaken, I have serviced many TV sets, and north-south versus
    east-west rotation will change purity.
    It is well known.
    And degaussing should fix it
    Same for a monitor, same 25 KV, same energy beam.
    It has perhaps nothing to do with screen size, it is related to the beam direction
    changing that little so when it goes through the shadow mask, it partly
    misses the correct pixel.
    The length of the tube, perhaps, has influence, that would make old 90 degree
    sets more sensitive then 110 deflection but I have not looked at the difference.
    JP



  10. #20
    Sally's Avatar
    Sally Guest

    Default Solar storm etc

    "David Knisely" <KA0CZC@navix.net> wrote in message
    The effect is real enough, and just to satisfy myself I just tried rotating
    both monitors in here by 90 degs. My el cheapo 16 inch monitor showed some
    green hues at top and bottom left corners when rotated. Another more
    expensive monitor turned pinkish at bottom left. Both monitors are free
    standing, one is used with a laptop several feet away to the left and the
    other has a tower PC several feet in underneath it. I can't see anything
    else in this room that could generate a magnetic field.

    I did some searching on this topic and many websites refer to preferred
    orientations when setting up CRT convergence. The standard is front-back
    facing north-south. So, either the effect is one of those urban myths, or it
    is real.

    Take a look at:
    http://www.anatekcorp.com/smask.htm
    This article is written by a Philips Engineer and goes into some detail
    about the interaction between the crt shadow mask, the earth's magnetic
    field and colour purity. He seems to be convinced that the effect is real
    :-)

    Sally







 

 
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