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Thread: Huge Sunspots

  1. #11
    CC's Avatar
    CC Guest

    Default Huge Sunspots



    In article <6bUmb.53193$ZH4.16201@twister.socal.rr.com>,
    <bob@hotmail.com> wrote:


    And I'm suggesting an event an order of magnitude greater. I'm
    suggesting that the Earth's EMT (electromagnetotoroid) could be
    stimulated into a mode change and that the effects of such a mode
    change (from E loop structure to H loop structure) are loss of magnetic
    field source, mass generation, planetary expansion, the effects of
    worldwide tensional tectonics which include the rapid subsidence of
    entire mountain chains, island chains, the rapid rise of new mountain
    systems, gigantic earthquakes, tsunamis, and sporodic hard radiation
    showers from solar flares and the impact of Coronal Mass Ejections upon
    the planet when not protected by a dipole magnetic field.

    There's a growing number of people (geologists, mostly) who have been
    introduced to the idea of an expanding earth in the last few years.
    While most individuals who support earth expansion related geological
    processes are at disagreement as to the cause or physics behind
    expansion they are, in most cases, in agreement that Earth expansion is
    a reality.

    CCRyder

    'email by swapping an 'i' for the 'y' in CCRyder.'

  2. #12
    's Avatar
    Guest

    Default Huge Sunspots


    "CC" <CCRyder@singtech.com> wrote in message
    news:271020031730389101%CCRyder@singtech.com...
    http://vulcan.wr.usgs.gov/Volcanoes/...llowstone.html
    volcanism.
    1.2
    spewed
    magmatic
    hot
    waterfalls
    mountains
    During
    700,000
    that
    to
    http://groups.google.com/groups?dq=&...newwindow=1&gr
    oup=sci.space.science&safe=off&selm=bn8vvc%242g5%2 41%40nntp1.jpl.nasa.gov

    That is not too far off from what I was thinking.


    http://www.raben.com/maps/
    Why is this Group so dead when the Sun is Going Nuts? At the Wrong time in
    the cycle?



  3. #13
    David Knisely's Avatar
    David Knisely Guest

    Default Huge Sunspots

    Bob posted:


    Most gave up on this group a long time ago, as a lot of people can't seem to
    read the "solar" part of the name. Thus, almost any topic in the "fringe"
    gets posted here rather than those only concerning the sun and solar
    observations (the real charter topic). Most serious solar observers are on
    one or more of the moderated e-mail lists, and they tend to be fairly active
    right now (no TEOFWAWKI ("The End of the World as We Know It") postings
    though). Its a lot of fun to watch the sun doing its thing right now
    (especially in H-alpha), considering where we are in the cycle. It was a real
    treat for me to watch the spectacular activity on the limb last week burst
    forth into several flares. However, such activity bursts have been known to
    occur on the cycle's downside, so its nothing exactly new (or alarming). In
    fact, many of the more impulsive flares tend to occur after sunspot maximum
    rather than at the peak of sunspot activity. I saw one of the largest ribbon
    flares I have ever seen only a year before sunspot minimum, so such big
    outbursts do happen. We are in the decline of the cycle, but not so much that
    the sun doesn't remind us who is "king of the solar system" every once in a
    while. Clear skies to you.
    --
    David W. Knisely KA0CZC@navix.net
    Prairie Astronomy Club: http://www.prairieastronomyclub.org
    Hyde Memorial Observatory: http://www.hydeobservatory.info/

    **********************************************
    * Attend the 11th Annual NEBRASKA STAR PARTY *
    * July 18-23, 2004, Merritt Reservoir *
    * http://www.NebraskaStarParty.org *
    **********************************************




  4. #14
    Martin Frey's Avatar
    Martin Frey Guest

    Default Huge Sunspots

    David Knisely <ka0czc@navix.net> wrote:

    <SNIP>

    David - thanks for your post. This group may be in the doldrums but
    you answered a question I have put in more on topic groups without
    getting an answer - is it normal for the Sun to have so many kicks
    left in it?

    As an observer of 2 years, this is my first decent to minimum and it
    hasn't been what I anticipated.

    This latest appearance, the ring (or horseshoe), seems to reinforce my
    unexpected conclusion that sunspots/groups are far less stable than
    they were 2 or 3 years ago - they develope and fade with greater
    rapidity. Where before you could count on a group to last 3 or 4
    rotations and be more or less recognisable on each rotation, for the
    last few months each day has been a surprise.

    Incidentally I made my first solar viewer, a projection scope, in
    early 2001 and had first light with it on March 28. As luck would have
    it, this first sight of the Sun was of a group containing the largest
    sunspot I have ever seen - and the biggest in the cycle. It dwarfed
    what's going on now, yet there were no shouts of apocalypse.

    Cheers

    Martin

    --------------
    Martin Frey
    N 51 02 E 0 47
    --------------

  5. #15
    's Avatar
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    Default Huge Sunspots


    "Martin Frey" <martinfrey@snipclara.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:2nespvsp72pvgh194o8ntoponrdp680mj8@4ax.com...
    in
    to
    In
    maximum
    http://www.sec.noaa.gov/today.html

    Looks like that one went "past" the X portion of the scale



  6. #16
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  7. #17
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    Default Huge Sunspots


    <bob@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news0unb.628$Ub4.349@twister.socal.rr.com...
    http://www.lmsal.com/solarsoft/last_events/



  8. #18
    David Knisely's Avatar
    David Knisely Guest

    Default Huge Sunspots

    Bob posted:


    There are several classes of solar events which are rated in terms of their
    X-ray output as well as their size (from the article OBSERVING THE SUN IN
    H-ALPHA on the Prairie Astronomy Club's website):

    Solar flares are ranked in importance by optical, X-ray, or radio flux.
    Soft X-ray intensity is measured in the 1-8 Angstrom range monitored by the
    GOES weather satellites. The classes are designated by the letters Bn
    (n x 10-7 w/m2), Cn (n x 10-6 w/m2), Mn (n x 10-5 w/m2), or Xn (n x 10-4
    w/m2), where n is the integer for each power of ten. Thus a flare classed as
    M3 would produce a soft X-ray flux of .00003 watts per square meter.
    Optically, flares are ranked by the area in square degrees of heliocentric
    latitude they take up on the disk. A square degree at the center of the
    solar disk is 12,147 km on a side, or at the sun's mean distance, each side
    of the square would be about 17 seconds of arc across. The optical class
    ranges from S (subflares) to 4 (largest).
    AREA (sqr. deg) OPTICAL CLASS TYPICAL SOFT X-RAY CLASS
    2.0 or less S (subflares) C2
    2.1-5.1 1 M3
    5.2-12.4 2 X1
    12.5-24.7 3 X5
    More than 24.7 4 X9
    *A suffix (f, n, b) is added if the brightness is faint, normal, or bright,
    based on a visual estimate.

    This last flare was X17, so its X-ray output at peak was about 17 x 10^-4
    watts per square meter, which is quite large (probably one of the largest seen
    during this cycle). Again, some of the more impressive solar flares tend to
    occur in the post-maximum part of the cycle. Clear skies to you.

    --
    David W. Knisely KA0CZC@navix.net
    Prairie Astronomy Club: http://www.prairieastronomyclub.org
    Hyde Memorial Observatory: http://www.hydeobservatory.info/

    **********************************************
    * Attend the 11th Annual NEBRASKA STAR PARTY *
    * July 18-23, 2004, Merritt Reservoir *
    * http://www.NebraskaStarParty.org *
    **********************************************




  9. #19
    David Knisely's Avatar
    David Knisely Guest

    Default Huge Sunspots

    Martin wrote:


    They are and they aren't. Active regions can have lifetimes measured anywhere
    from days to over a month. Typically, they do not last much more than one
    solar rotation, although a few large ones have lasted longer. These
    Gamma-Delta groups are known for their activity and are the frequent site of
    major solar flares. The "ring" which you have seen is merely an odd-form of
    group and not necessarily indicative of life span or spot stability. If you
    want to know more about how active regions develop, you might want to read the
    article OBSERVING THE SUN IN H-ALPHA on the website of the Prairie Astronomy
    Club (see URL below). Clear skies to you.
    --
    David W. Knisely KA0CZC@navix.net
    Prairie Astronomy Club: http://www.prairieastronomyclub.org
    Hyde Memorial Observatory: http://www.hydeobservatory.info/

    **********************************************
    * Attend the 11th Annual NEBRASKA STAR PARTY *
    * July 18-23, 2004, Merritt Reservoir *
    * http://www.NebraskaStarParty.org *
    **********************************************




 

 
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