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Thread: Scientists confirm: space rock hit Moon during lunar eclipse

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    Default Scientists confirm: space rock hit Moon during lunar eclipse



    From Ars Technica:

    https://arstechnica.com/science/2019...lunar-eclipse/

    Whew! I'm glad we finally have confirmation of what many were able to see first hand!

    smp
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    Default Re: Scientists confirm: space rock hit Moon during lunar eclipse

    Well, although I didn't notice that tiny flash myself when observing the eclipse (and if I had, I would have just thought it was something in my eye, anyway), I had no reason to doubt the earlier reports of it by amateur astronomers, especially since there was video of it published, right? Frankly, I find the article title distasteful. We don't need "scientists" to "confirm" that which non-scientists can observe for themselves. Amateur astronomers making detailed observations, especially when recording/photographing those observations, and when confirming those observations with other amateur astronomers acting independently, is every bit as "scientific" as anything done by "scientists" who may be paid to do the same thing. In this case, the latter are not "confirming" anything, except that they saw it too, and they may also be gathering or adding some additional reports of observations and/or analyses of their own. That's nice, and it may even add to knowledge base, but it isn't necessary as a "confirmation". Their so-called "confirmation" is fully irrelevant. The observations of the event were already both made and confirmed, regardless of any work done by the particular scientists cited in the article. This kind of excessive reverence for authority and lack of faith in one's own observations -- e.g., "who are you going to believe, me or your lying eyes?" -- simply isn't healthy for the citizenry. It IS possible to both learn and know things without being taught those things by someone in authority. But it seems that to those in the media, all that matters is what "experts" say. Hmm. That's pretty convenient, isn't it, if/when they want to push certain political agendas! Never trust your own observations, right? Did something hit the moon? They literally want you to believe that it is impossible to know, unless someone with an advanced degree and speaking to a mainstream news organization tells you! Until then, you must never, never trust your own eyes, even when those observations are confirmed by other "amateur" astronomers. "Truth" can only be known by certain news media (and never through one's own observations) who will speak to the "scientists" on our behalf, and to whom we must all bow in obedience. Sigh.

    Added: And I say all that, as a "scientist" myself -- so you have to believe me.
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    Default Re: Scientists confirm: space rock hit Moon during lunar eclipse

    Hi Stephen and AG. Excellent posts from both of you. And a case in point, is the fine capture from forum member and moderator bladekeeper (Bryan) last January, here at:
    Captured Meteor Strike During the Eclipse
    Scroll down the page 5, find his video, hit play, expand to full screen, and watch near the lower left corner of the video (It happens quickly about half way through the video).
    - Marshall

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    Default Re: Scientists confirm: space rock hit Moon during lunar eclipse

    I am guessing that something got lost in the translation. The meteor strike was confirmed not long after it happened. Pretty hard to ignore the evidence from dozens of videos.

    What's new this week is that they calculated the impact speed to be 61,000 km/h (or maybe it was mph, can't recall). Typical of bad reporting: the writer didn't understand what the new part of the news was and just regurgitated old stuff.

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