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Thread: asteroid safety tips

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    Default Re: asteroid safety tips



    Quote Originally Posted by Limemobber View Post
    How small do the fragments have to be for them to burn up in the atmosphere.

    The math is well beyond me but I am sure a nuke hitting a 400m asteroid is not going to create 8 asteroids of 200m, does it create even one? Or does it create 6 asteroids of 50m size or so (number and size made up since they are not really the point) and hundreds of pieces smaller that all burn up without hitting the ground.
    There is no way to answer your question without knowing the composition of the asteroids. Last time I looked at the maths was some years ago but depending on the nature of the asteroid it might be completely ineffective (1 chunk), break it into ~half dozen chunks that would actually make the devastation more effective, or break it into many pieces that would be consumed in the atmosphere.

    You need to know the nature of the asteroid before you can throw a nuke at it with any idea what will happen.
    Past items italicized. Scopes: Refractors: Orion ST80 (mods for white light solar), SV ED80 f7, Orion and SW 80 and 120 ED doublets, Orion 120 f8.3, Tasco 30x30, Edmund 40; Newtonians: AT 8”f4, OC 8”f6.3, Z12 f5, self made 6” f9, Orion XX14i; Catadioptrics: VMC110L, Intes MK66, Orion 102 MakCas f12.7, Celestron 9.25 SCT and 9.25 Edge. EPs: KK Fujiyama Orthoscopics, 2x Vixen NPLs (40-6mm) and BCOs, Baader Mark IV zooms, TV Panoptics, Delos, TV Nagler, ES100s. Mounts: Orion Sirius EQG, Star Seeker III, Celestron CG5, Vixen Porta II, Losmandy G11

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    Default Re: asteroid safety tips

    Is it accurate for me to assume that metallic asteroids mostly made of nickle-iron are the most dangerous? My first thought is that any asteroid that is predominantly silicates is less dangerous. Assuming asteroids of the same size.

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    Default Re: asteroid safety tips

    Quote Originally Posted by Limemobber View Post
    Is it accurate for me to assume that metallic asteroids mostly made of nickle-iron are the most dangerous? My first thought is that any asteroid that is predominantly silicates is less dangerous. Assuming asteroids of the same size.
    They are most solid, and that's about all you can say. It might be more possible to nudge them into a different orbit with a nuke if they hold together.

    Carbonaceous / silicate bodies are tough since you don't know how they would break.

    Rubble piles might be the only ones that could be safely counted on to be broken into many pieces that would burn up.
    Past items italicized. Scopes: Refractors: Orion ST80 (mods for white light solar), SV ED80 f7, Orion and SW 80 and 120 ED doublets, Orion 120 f8.3, Tasco 30x30, Edmund 40; Newtonians: AT 8”f4, OC 8”f6.3, Z12 f5, self made 6” f9, Orion XX14i; Catadioptrics: VMC110L, Intes MK66, Orion 102 MakCas f12.7, Celestron 9.25 SCT and 9.25 Edge. EPs: KK Fujiyama Orthoscopics, 2x Vixen NPLs (40-6mm) and BCOs, Baader Mark IV zooms, TV Panoptics, Delos, TV Nagler, ES100s. Mounts: Orion Sirius EQG, Star Seeker III, Celestron CG5, Vixen Porta II, Losmandy G11

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    Default Re: asteroid safety tips

    I know they have plans, we can try this or that. I wonder why they dont practice. Target an object and see what happens? They could have tried deflecting the chinese space station. Or even landing a marker on asteroids that have been close, a few have past within the moons orbit, to test tracking and ideas. Ofcourse the russian incident was not tracked and came out of nowhere. Is it going to be like the movies? brucewillis to save the dayi. An, all in or perish deal? Wile they have had spacecraft on asteroids, they could test some ideas while they are there, ie, lets blow up an asteroid, headed in the other direction, to see what happens? Just some thoughts...
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    Default Re: asteroid safety tips

    Quote Originally Posted by Chinaman4u View Post
    I know they have plans, we can try this or that. I wonder why they dont practice.
    Because it costs a lot.

    \Target an object and see what happens? They could have tried deflecting the chinese space station.

    I would expect the Chinese to complain about interfering with their property.

    Or even landing a marker on asteroids that have been close, a few have past within the moons orbit, to test tracking and ideas. Ofcourse the russian incident was not tracked and came out of nowhere. Is it going to be like the movies? brucewillis to save the dayi. An, all in or perish deal? Wile they have had spacecraft on asteroids, they could test some ideas while they are there, ie, lets blow up an asteroid, headed in the other direction, to see what happens? Just some thoughts...
    All asteroids are not created equal. What results from one trial will not hold for another.

    There won't be any money to consider any of this until the James Webb Space Telescope is launched, anyway.

    Dawn and Rosetta are adequate initial practice.
    Last edited by not_Fritz_Argelander; 07-11-2018 at 10:59 PM.
    Past items italicized. Scopes: Refractors: Orion ST80 (mods for white light solar), SV ED80 f7, Orion and SW 80 and 120 ED doublets, Orion 120 f8.3, Tasco 30x30, Edmund 40; Newtonians: AT 8”f4, OC 8”f6.3, Z12 f5, self made 6” f9, Orion XX14i; Catadioptrics: VMC110L, Intes MK66, Orion 102 MakCas f12.7, Celestron 9.25 SCT and 9.25 Edge. EPs: KK Fujiyama Orthoscopics, 2x Vixen NPLs (40-6mm) and BCOs, Baader Mark IV zooms, TV Panoptics, Delos, TV Nagler, ES100s. Mounts: Orion Sirius EQG, Star Seeker III, Celestron CG5, Vixen Porta II, Losmandy G11

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