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  1. #11
    astronut's Avatar
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    Bob stated the obvious .............perfectly.
    The mount is the most importaint part for Astrophotography & can get financially ugly FAST. The better ones have auto guider jacks etc on them & are built military grade almost......................
    Dave
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  2. #12
    IrishMcLean's Avatar
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    It looks like I'll be going for the Orion Astroview 100mm for my first scope. I spent a few days weighing the pros and cons of the 100mm and the 90mm. Many said that the 90mm was better for beginner scope, and some said they found it more useful overall.

    One opinion I heard however is that higher magnification can be frustrating unless you can locate objects exactly, and your mount is extremely stable.

    Here is why I think 100mm might be better choice:
    1. As a beginner, the slightly lower magnication and wider FOV might be easier to use.
    2. The 90mm scope is enormous and borderline imposing. The 100mm is a much more practical size for transporting, using, storing, and many other reasons.
    3. Wider aperture only helps.

    My only concern is that the 24x magnification seems on the low side for both long-range terrestrial viewing and wide celestial - I could be wrong about this. In daylight I would like to be able to do some long-range terrestrial viewing, is 24x enough for this? And is 60mm too much? Also, will any sized eyepiece work with this F6 scope? In other words, if I wanted @ 30x, could I just buy a 20mm eye piece? Or do F6 telescopes only operate with very specific sized eyepieces?

    For high-powered magnification, it sounds like anything over 100x isn't ultra-reaslistic in many cases for celestial-viewing, and that the 60x to 100x range is far more ideal for the higher power-range. Still, will I be able to attain let's say 80x or 90x? Using a Barlow2x with a 10mm lense puts me at 120x with this scope, and that just seems way too much. If I wanted anything in the range between 60x and 120x, would I need to buy an 8mm lense

    These questions seem nitpicky, but I'm trying to get a feel for this, and trying to have a scope that will serve all my needs for many years.

    I'm just about there though! Thanks for all of the advice so far.
    Last edited by IrishMcLean; 01-07-2011 at 10:30 PM.

  3. #13
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    you asked/or stated:
    One opinion I heard however is that higher magnification can be frustrating unless you can locate objects exactly, and your mount is extremely stable...

    =================
    At the magnification the 100 mm scope can give you (it is rated at 200x) finding your target honestly is not that hard as you also have a large fov and a simple Finder makes it much much easier anyway ....to follow the star most mounts have slow motion controls and if you can;t follow your target which only moves about 15 degrees an hour I;d say you most likely are not able to walk and chew gum either...Both non issues in my opinion..

    =================
    You then asked:
    My only concern is that the 24x magnification seems on the low side for both long-range terrestrial viewing and wide celestial - I could be wrong about this. In daylight I would like to be able to do some long-range terrestrial viewing, is 24x enough for this? And is 60mm too much? Also, will any sized eyepiece work with this F6 scope? In other words, if I wanted @ 30x, could I just buy a 20mm eye piece? Or do F6 telescopes only operate with very specific sized eyepieces?

    ==============
    most binoculars are either 6 8 or 10 power...even at 24x that telescope is a lot more then 6 8 or 10x....

    Any 1.25 inch format eyepiece will work in the Orion ..and if you buy a 2 inch diagonal then you could use either 1.25 inch or 2 inch eyepieces in that 2 inch diagonal... and Yes if you want 30x just drop in a 20 mm eyepiece

    ==================
    Then you also asked:
    For high-powered magnification, it sounds like anything over 100x isn't ultra-reaslistic in many cases for celestial-viewing, and that the 60x to 100x range is far more ideal for the higher power-range. Still, will I be able to attain let's say 80x or 90x? Using a Barlow2x with a 10mm lense puts me at 120x with this scope, and that just seems way too much. If I wanted anything in the range between 60x and 120x, would I need to buy an 8mm lense
    ===============

    120x "should be obtainable" on normal nights...its just that normal im my neck of the woods is not all that good but 100x I can get to on any night... I'm willing to bet you a 10 mm eyepiece and a 2x barlow will work at least 9 nights out of 10 or even on 99 nights out of 100

    The nitpickky stuff only begins AFTER you buy any scope...there is NO ONE scope that is good at everything

    CLEAR SKIES

    Bob G
    CPC1100 housed in a slotted domed observatory (Exploradome) 4 and 5 inch refractors for use from the lawn, a 8" Sct (NS 8i) for star parties...
    I Hate the winter so I use heated Motorcycle clothing to stay warm while observing in winter
    Retired, also have 2 other hobbies
    1. tinker with older Corvettes (6 in garage)
    2. make a heck of a lot of sawdust in my wood shop.

  4. #14
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    A bit late for this.. but, I have the 70mm & 90mm Astromaster scopes. They are great. I originally bout the 70mm for it's altaz mount/tripod. For my Astrotech 66mm ED. It was worth the money just for that purpose..! But, was pleasantly surprised at the optical quality of the 70mm. So.. natch, I ordered the 90mm EQ, lol. It too is a great performer. 'Almost' a 4" refractor at that low price.. how could I not..?

  5. #15
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    All of a year later, I went ahead and purchased a Celestron SkyScout 90. It fit the bill for everything I was looking for - a medium tube refractor (F/6.6), 90mm or higher aperture, AZ mount, erect-image/diagonal (non-reversed image) for terrestrial vieweing, and very easy to trasnport. I'll admit that in all my searching somehow I missed this one. But once I did stumble upon it - after reading a few reviews it seemed like this would be the perfect selection for a first scope.

    This one's an F/6.6 and was designed for that SkyScout Celestron software - which I have no intention of getting at this time. I read the optics were terrific indepedently. While I don't have much basis of comparison, so far with this scope -- and from my city bedroom window -- I've seen solid views of Saturn and Jupiter. Saturn's rings were defined, and were not just a blur. Mind you, I live 1 mile from Washington, DC and am looking from indoors through not only a window, but through a haze of city lights. This is one of the reasons I went refractor. In taking it outside for first time (was in backyard of a townhouse in downtown DC) I got very clear image of Jupiter and moons at 66X - could see bands fairly easily. Folks who saw it were very impressed.

    As most reviewers commented, the one main negative with this scope is the mount. When moving/tracking vertical it does not lock. Example, if you locate an object when looking through scope or finder-scope, as soon as you release the handle, it will jerk down an interval. So in other words, I almost have to aim above an object so the scope will "fall" on the target. It's by no means a deal-breaker but it is mildy annoying.

    The magnification with 10mm eyepiece (F/6.6) is 66X. I bought an Orion Shorty 2x Barlow, and promptly learned my first lesson that higher magnification comes at a cost of both light and detail. It was a tradeoff indeed, as having an image slightly larger but slightly faded and blurred did not carry advantage over the 66X. Since then I have stuck with the 10mm w/out the Barlow, as it yields the best image. I am interested though in exploring other options for higher magnification through the scope, whether it is a "better" Barlow lense, or a slightly smaller quality eyepice of 6-8mm. From what I've seen, most don't go too far below 10mm eyepiece, but I would like to find some ideas to increase magnification beyond 66X (mostly for planets) but not lose as much light or detail as I am now with the Orion Shorty paired with the Plossl eyepieces of the scope. Again, I'm guessing this might require spending a few more dollars on better quality eyepieces as opposed to ones that merely yield higher magnification alone.

    Overall though, for 250$, I felt I made a perfect purchase for what I wanted on the first go-around.

  6. #16
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    Seeing galaxies requires reasonably dark skies. Only a very few are "somewhat" visible with any kind of light pollution.

    Clear skies.
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  8. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by IrishMcLean View Post
    All of a year later, I went ahead and purchased a Celestron SkyScout 90. It fit the bill for everything I was looking for - a medium tube refractor (F/6.6), 90mm or higher aperture, AZ mount, erect-image/diagonal (non-reversed image) for terrestrial vieweing, and very easy to trasnport. I'll admit that in all my searching somehow I missed this one. But once I did stumble upon it - after reading a few reviews it seemed like this would be the perfect selection for a first scope...
    Thanks for the update! It's nice to hear people who used this forum to help select their first telescope report back on their choice after about a year of use.

    When I decided to get back into astronomy early last year (2010), I seriously considered a Celestron 90mm refractor, since the last scope I had (when I was a teenager) was also a refractor. But I ended up going the reflector route. This Christmas, I bought myself a 80mm F/5 refractor (to be used mainly as a travel scope). Looking forward to having a shootout and comparing the views with my reflector(s), especially on the planets.

    Hopefully you'll get a chance to do some dark sky observing (via a camping trip or star party) if you haven't done so already.

 

 
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