The mars exploration program: part 1

  1. RonPrice
    SOME PROSE-POETIC-PERSONAL THOUGHTS ON
    THE MARS EXPLORATION PROGRAM

    In the last 17 years during which I’ve had a website I’ve been inspired by various events in astronomy. Some of my inspirations I’ve placed in the astronomy sub-section of my website. The following sequence of prose and poetry has, as part of its inspiration, the exploration of Mars some 80 million km away. In the last week, 3/2/’13 to 10/2/’13, some of the best photos of NASA’s Mars rover, named Curiosity, have become accessible in cyberspace. During this week, I celebrated my 14th year of retirement from FT work and one of the best summers in my life, my 69 years on the planet. This summer has had only 3 days over 25 degrees celsius and I don't like heat. I've lived through 50 summers on mainland Australia and in southern Ontario where the heat was oppressive. The following words are a personal-prose-poetic reflection on the Mars project.
  2. RonPrice
    Part 2:
    -----------------
    Taken on a Martian flat spot called John Klein, one of the images was published yesterday in cyberspace by scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The photo is a composition of multiple photos taken by the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) on 3 February 2013. According to one writer, the photo was “freaking awesome”. This is how the magic of the photo happened:
    MAHLI took the component images for this photo-mosaic. The camera is mounted on a turret at the end of the arm. Wrist motions and turret rotations on the arm allowed MAHLI to acquire the mosaic’s component images. The arm was positioned out of the shot in the images or portions of images used in the mosaic. Go to this link for the latest news on the project: Mars Exploration Program
  3. RonPrice
    Part 2:
    -----------------
    Taken on a Martian flat spot called John Klein, one of the images was published yesterday in cyberspace by scientists at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The photo is a composition of multiple photos taken by the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) on 3 February 2013. According to one writer, the photo was “freaking awesome”. This is how the magic of the photo happened:
    MAHLI took the component images for this photo-mosaic. The camera is mounted on a turret at the end of the arm. Wrist motions and turret rotations on the arm allowed MAHLI to acquire the mosaic’s component images. The arm was positioned out of the shot in the images or portions of images used in the mosaic. Go to this link for the latest news on the project: Mars Exploration Program
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