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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by joeychitwood View Post
    Not only is the universe still expanding, it is accelerating. In the last couple of years, even the Big Bang Theory is being called into question in favor of the concept of new multiple universes "budding" off of existing ones or even the possibility that our universe is the result of two parallel "brane" universes bumping into each other. In any case, it's looking less and less like there was ever a beginning or and end.
    I have to say I find the idea of no begining or an end confusing. If there was no beginning, what was there before the big bang? How long was the singularity there before it inflated?

    The other one that scares me is the end, according to what Ive read, eventually the universe will literally run out of fuel. All the elements will have eventually been fused, the matter will be so sparse as not to form into new suns and the universe will be cold, dark, empty and most matter will be iron. In this case a new big bang would be welcome!

    Its a fascinating and frustrating subject really, we have about as much chance of answering these questions as an ant has of exploring Europe.

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  2. #12
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    Default "Math is never wrong"

    Hello friends of Big Bang, math and physics,

    there are two things to worry about,

    1. Math is certainly not wrong, but you cannot prove it right, see the Kurt Goedel's Theorem
    2. Math is worthless, unless you can make money with it. (I've got two patents on applied math, one in Germany and another one in the U.S.)

    Still having some nice lemmas to the theorems in the sideboard. But you know what happens, when you get retired.

    Best

    JG
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  3. #13
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    My understanding is that dark energy (or the cosmological constant, or lambda- all "just terms", but terms needed to make the math work out) is required to explain an accelerating expansion of the universe. This expansion was observed by looking at the emissions of type 1A supernova (which are extremely reliable in there energy production) and discerning a correlation between distance and the velocity of expansion. My question is that since distance it the equivalent of looking back in time, isn't this what one would expect of a decelerating universe? What am I missing?

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    There are two ways to try to measure these great distances. One is by collecting the spectrum of distant galaxies, measure their recession velocity from the doppler shift, and assign a distance based on a linear (steady) rate of expansion of the universe (double the velocity means double the distance). The other is by measuring the apparent brightness of type Ia supernovae in those galaxies and determining the distance under the assumption that all those supernovae have and have always had the same peak brightness and brightness decay time. Well, those two methods fail to give the same result. The supernovae appear to be too dim, and accordingly that places them farther away, meaning that the rate of expansion has been accelerating in the last (?) few billion years.

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