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  1. #11
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    If you are looking to get into any sort of astrophotography you should defiantly buy the CG5 mount. An equatorial mount is a must when doing astrophotography and it will help you learn the stars by having to align it for proper tracking. Furthermore, it will allow you to take longer exposures. The celestron 6se mount will vary after 6 seconds of guiding on jupiter, and it wont support a guide scope. on the other hand the CG5 will track jupiter for about 10 seconds with no guide scope and up to minutes with a guide scope (which you can buy later for under $400)

    As for a scope to go with the mount, you should go with a good Newtonian Reflector. with 8" of aperture you'll be able to see plenty for a while and photograph nebula and star clusters with only 5 seconds of exposure. A good combination for just asto-viewing would be the Celestron Advanced Series C8-NGT Reflector Telescope.... BUT, it would be hard to adapt your camera to the eyepiece because the focuser is not a crayford style.

    A good scope/mount combination would be Orion 8" f/4.0 Newtonian Astrograph Reflector with the CG-5 mount. It'll be a little over $1000 but WELL worth it. You could potentially upgrade that scope/mount with up to $3000 worth of excessories in the next 5 years and make it almost a pro-quality astrophotography set up.

    And to connect your camera, Yes, you do need adaptors but they will cost you less than $75 with shipping.

  2. #12
    Ychen's Avatar
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    So reflectors are better than SCTs? I'm looking to do about 70% just normal observing and 30% astrophotography. I want to be able to see nebulae and galaxies but I also want to see the planets, the moon, and other things in our solar system. what type of telescope would be best for this?

  3. #13
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    SCT is a form of reflector - one that folds the light twice to get a longish focal length inside a short tube.
    You look through the back of this and that means you don't have to be an acrobat.
    A Newtonian flips over as the star goes from East to West and the EP follows it meaning you have to follow it too hence the yoga stance.
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    /wide field scope. 10x10 shed with dome. Sky watcher sky adventurer mount.

  4. #14
    jginglis423's Avatar
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    Whether a newtonian is better than a SCT is up for debate, however, if you want to see nebula and galaxys with your naked eye you need 8" of aperature and an 8" newtonian is more affordable than a 8" sct by far...

    As for the position of the focuser, it is not that hard to look through the eyepeice. Sure, it'll be a little harder, but i dont think that matters much when you could save $400 and use that money to spend on good accessories.

  5. #15
    jginglis423's Avatar
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    Also, you should visit Andy Shotglass's Webpage and watch some of his articles. Here is his article on how to make a choice of buying a telescope for under $800.

    Andy's Shot Glass -The 800 Dollar Question

  6. #16
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    Is a computerized mount worth the money? I'm a novice right now so I think it would help me but is it a good move for a first telescope?

  7. #17
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    I bought a non go-to mount for my first telescope and it would have defiantly helped me with navigating the skys. While i do know the starts decently well now, i believe that if i had a go-to mount i would have taken it out more often and learned even more about star gazing

  8. #18
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    I'm getting really frustrated right now about what size telescope will yield good sized and good detailed views of nebulae and galaxies as well as planets and the moon. I saw some example pictures taken when using a C6 SGT and they looked really small and fuzzy. How come some people's picture are horrible and some are really good? Will I see only black and white through the telescope? Which type of telescope is better for my needs: astrophotography for deep space as well as planets and moon, ability to see DSOs without too much fuzziness, and under $1100? Can some people post a few pictures of what to expect from 6" and 8" telescopes of each type? And please tell me what telescope you used. thanks

  9. #19
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    You need to do a lot of reading because a lot of different aspects of a telescope affect how it functions as a astrophotography telescope. Just look for a fast scope. What i mean by this is you must find a scope with a fast focal ratio. A telescope with a focal ratio of f/6 or faster, like a f/4, will take SO MUCH LESS time to take a photo. If a telescope Specs. do not tell you the telescope's focal ratio it is easy to calculate...

    Focal Ratio = (Focal Length)/(aperature)

    The reason for this is because the longer the focal length, the more zoom a given scope will have with a given camera. For instance: If you have a camera that when focused acts as a 9mm eyepiece then to calculate the zoom you need the focal length divided by the focal length of the eyepiece (9mm). A scope with a focal length of 500mm would have 55X zoom. A 800mm scope would have 88.8X zoom. IF both of these telescopes had the same aperture (the same amount of light grabbing power), then the 500mm would grab more light per second then the 800mm simply because the telescope is looking at more sky, therefore more light. SO, focal ratio is what really matters..... a 10" scope with a focal ratio f/5 would take the same amount of time to take the same quality picture as a 5" scope with a focal ratio of f/5. The difference is that the 10" scope would then have a longer focal length and the image produced would be of larger zoom

  10. #20
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    the smaller the focal ratio the better? like f/2 is better than f/6?

 

 
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