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  1. #1
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    Default Clocks on a space ship moving very fast relative to the Earth run slow when viewed



    from? A.) The space ship
    B.) Earth
    C.) Both places
    D.) neither place

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    only B.) makes sense

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    How would we view a clock inside a spaceship from Earth. I don't think the Hubble is that powerful. Besides do they have windows in the back of the spaceships so someone can see in from the rear as it is leaving the Earth?

    I think the answer is "E" (all of the above).

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    They run faster in space . In the movies , someone on a space ship makes it to the moon in just 5 minuets , and we all know that it takes longer than 5 minuets to get to the moon .LOL
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    Quote Originally Posted by roverich View Post
    They run faster in space . In the movies , someone on a space ship makes it to the moon in just 5 minuets , and we all know that it takes longer than 5 minuets to get to the moon .LOL
    You saw that movie too?

    If it is a mechanical clock, it will mark time at exactly the same speed it does when on earth. It may not be accurate, however, but the mechanism is designed to move the hands at a specific speed based on the gears/spring, etc.

    Mike

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    Quote Originally Posted by TambourineMan View Post
    How would we view a clock inside a spaceship from Earth. I don't think the Hubble is that powerful. Besides do they have windows in the back of the spaceships so someone can see in from the rear as it is leaving the Earth?

    I think the answer is "E" (all of the above).
    Oh Boy! T-Man the clock on the spaceship is filmed by a camera on said spaceship then the image transmitted back to Earth.

    Now lets say the spaceship is half a light year away, well then the transmission takes six months to get here so the clock is six months slow. Easy!

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    Time is relative too the observer in space.

    A clock whether the observer is moving or stationary will appear to the observer too be moving at the same rate.

    However time dilation occurs when an spacecraft approaches the speed of light

    Time dilation is the phenomenon whereby an observer finds that another's clock, which is physically identical to their own, is ticking at a slower rate as measured by their own clock.

    This is often interpreted as time "slowing down" for the other clock, but that is only true in the context of the observer's frame of reference.

    Locally (i.e., from the perspective of any observer within the same frame of reference, without reference to another frame of reference), time always passes at the same rate.

    The time dilation phenomenon applies to any process that manifests change over time.

    In Albert Einstein's theories of relativity, time dilation is manifested in two circumstances:

    In special relativity, clocks that are moving with respect to an inertial system of observation are measured to be running slower. This effect is described precisely by the Lorentz transformation.
    In general relativity, clocks at lower potentials in a gravitational field — such as in proximity to a planet — are found to be running slower. This gravitational time dilation is only briefly mentioned in this article; see that article (and also gravitational red shift) for a more detailed discussion.
    In special relativity, the time dilation effect is reciprocal: as observed from the point of view of any two clocks which are in motion with respect to each other, it will be the other party's clock that is time dilated. (This presumes that the relative motion of both parties is uniform; that is, they do not accelerate with respect to one another during the course of the observations.)

    In contrast, gravitational time dilation (as treated in general relativity) is not reciprocal: an observer at the top of a tower will observe that clocks at ground level tick slower, and observers on the ground will agree. Thus gravitational time dilation is agreed upon by all observers, independent of their altitude.

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    So it's all that speed that slows down the gears and springs? Oor does it just seem like the little hand takes longer to go around?

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    Well, that depends....
    ... is it 4:55pm on Friday or 8:03am Monday ????
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    Quote Originally Posted by trevorw View Post
    Time is relative too the observer in space.

    A clock whether the observer is moving or stationary will appear to the observer too be moving at the same rate.

    However time dilation occurs when an spacecraft approaches the speed of light

    Time dilation is the phenomenon whereby an observer finds that another's clock, which is physically identical to their own, is ticking at a slower rate as measured by their own clock.

    This is often interpreted as time "slowing down" for the other clock, but that is only true in the context of the observer's frame of reference.

    Locally (i.e., from the perspective of any observer within the same frame of reference, without reference to another frame of reference), time always passes at the same rate.

    The time dilation phenomenon applies to any process that manifests change over time.

    In Albert Einstein's theories of relativity, time dilation is manifested in two circumstances:

    In special relativity, clocks that are moving with respect to an inertial system of observation are measured to be running slower. This effect is described precisely by the Lorentz transformation.
    In general relativity, clocks at lower potentials in a gravitational field such as in proximity to a planet are found to be running slower. This gravitational time dilation is only briefly mentioned in this article; see that article (and also gravitational red shift) for a more detailed discussion.
    In special relativity, the time dilation effect is reciprocal: as observed from the point of view of any two clocks which are in motion with respect to each other, it will be the other party's clock that is time dilated. (This presumes that the relative motion of both parties is uniform; that is, they do not accelerate with respect to one another during the course of the observations.)

    In contrast, gravitational time dilation (as treated in general relativity) is not reciprocal: an observer at the top of a tower will observe that clocks at ground level tick slower, and observers on the ground will agree. Thus gravitational time dilation is agreed upon by all observers, independent of their altitude.
    So is this answer F?
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