Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    carnevali's Avatar
    carnevali is offline HYPER GIANT
    Points: 19,320, Level: 96
    Level completed: 5%, Points required for next Level: 380
    Overall activity: 0%
    Achievements:
    200+ Posts Achievement!First 1000 Experience PointsGot three Friends100+ Threads Achievement!Ghost Achievement! Averaging 5+ posts a day!
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    morehead, KY
    Posts
    2,563
    Points
    19,320
    Level
    96
    Thanks
    637
    Thanked 979x 732 Posts

    Default "Easier than expected," they said ...



    I had read several reports that seeing Polarissima Borealis - the Northernmost galaxy, 1 degree from the North Celestial Pole - is easier than expected, and that they have seen it in 6" and even 4.5" apertures. How is that possible? I had to try hard for four nights with my 10" reflector before I finally caught the feeble light in the corner of my eye. The galaxy is compact, but it's only magnitude 14. I wonder if some who reported seeing it got confused with the mag 12.5 star in close proximity, perhaps they just saw that dim star instead? Anyone here got experience with detecting Polarissima? I think it's NOT easy at all!

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    Antonino Carnevali
    Dobs: Zhumell Z10; SpaceWalk 18"; Celestron First Scope(!)
    Altaz reflectors: Vixen R130SF, R150S
    Refractors: Vixen ED115S, ED80SF, A70L; SkyPod go-to mount
    Binoculars: Orion BT70 on VersaGo

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to carnevali For This Useful Post:

    ibase (03-15-2011)

  3. #2
    KT4HX's Avatar
    KT4HX is offline HYPER GIANT
    Points: 101,098, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 35.0%
    Achievements:
    365 Days+ Registered Achievement!First 1000 Experience Points750 Days+ Registered Achievement!1000 Days+ Registered Achievement!200+ Posts Achievement!
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    11,765
    Points
    101,098
    Level
    100
    Thanks
    1,432
    Thanked 8,084x 4,352 Posts
    Blog Entries
    200

    Default

    You might be correct on that confusion issue. This is what Tom Trusock over at Cloudy Nights says about it:

    "Don't expect a lot - visually there's just not much there. From a suburban site, you'll need a bigger telescope and some luck to see anything. From a darker site, an 8 or 10" should suffice to show you a small bit of celestial fluff."

    So based on what he says, you did good on that one. I am not sure I could see it (haven't tried) from my orange zone with the Z10, but I should be able to with the 17.5.
    Alan || My DSO Blog:
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Astro Sky 17.5 f/4.5 Dob ||
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    f/5 Dob || Zhumell Z10 f/4.9 Dob
    ES AR127 f/6.5 and ES ED80 f/6 on Twilight-II Mount
    ES 82° 24mm, 18mm; Pentax XW 10mm, 7mm, 5mm
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Astronomers: We look into the past to see our future.

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to KT4HX For This Useful Post:

    carnevali (03-15-2011)

  5. #3
    carnevali's Avatar
    carnevali is offline HYPER GIANT
    Points: 19,320, Level: 96
    Level completed: 5%, Points required for next Level: 380
    Overall activity: 0%
    Achievements:
    200+ Posts Achievement!First 1000 Experience PointsGot three Friends100+ Threads Achievement!Ghost Achievement! Averaging 5+ posts a day!
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    morehead, KY
    Posts
    2,563
    Points
    19,320
    Level
    96
    Thanks
    637
    Thanked 979x 732 Posts

    Default

    Thanks for the feedback, Alan. I imagine that sharper eyes operating from a superdark site might detect it in a 6" aperture, but I don't believe those "easier than expected" statements. I was happy to just get a sideway glimpse of it after three failed attempts. By the way, if you want to try it, I can give you directions that would help (all the stars around there are dim).

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    Antonino Carnevali
    Dobs: Zhumell Z10; SpaceWalk 18"; Celestron First Scope(!)
    Altaz reflectors: Vixen R130SF, R150S
    Refractors: Vixen ED115S, ED80SF, A70L; SkyPod go-to mount
    Binoculars: Orion BT70 on VersaGo

  6. #4
    Joe Lalumia's Avatar
    Joe Lalumia is offline HYPER GIANT
    Points: 61,001, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 0%
    Achievements:
    200+ Posts Achievement!Ghost Achievement! Averaging 5+ posts a day!Got three FriendsFirst 1000 Experience Points20+ Friends Achievement!
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Quinlan, Texas
    Posts
    10,947
    Points
    61,001
    Level
    100
    Thanks
    6,772
    Thanked 5,156x 3,400 Posts
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Joe,

    Being an old guy, I get a good laugh out of many of the articles written about "visual observing" dim objects like galaxies in binoculars or a small scope.

    Personally I think some of the people writing the articles either have SUPERMAN X Ray vision, or can actually "see" --------- "imaginary objects", invisible to everyone except themselves, in the night sky. ( or they are exaggerating their observing abilities!) I PURPOSELY include many of the guys that write articles for S&T and or Astronomy magazine.

    Clear skies!
    ETX 125PE, Stellarvue 80mm BV & Televue TelePod tripod,
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    8" LNT, 10x50, 15x70mm binoculars, Stellarvue binoviewers, solar filters for all three
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    ..... plus a bunch of ham radios... Ham radio call sign - W1XWX

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    TelescopeMan Web Site

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    search for W1XWX to see my amateur radio web site

    "If you can't explain it to a six year old, you don't understand it yourself.” - Albert Einstein

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.

  7. #5
    carnevali's Avatar
    carnevali is offline HYPER GIANT
    Points: 19,320, Level: 96
    Level completed: 5%, Points required for next Level: 380
    Overall activity: 0%
    Achievements:
    200+ Posts Achievement!First 1000 Experience PointsGot three Friends100+ Threads Achievement!Ghost Achievement! Averaging 5+ posts a day!
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    morehead, KY
    Posts
    2,563
    Points
    19,320
    Level
    96
    Thanks
    637
    Thanked 979x 732 Posts

    Default

    Since now I can find my way to it easily, at the next opportunity I'll give it a try with my 18" reflector. Hopefully I'll see it more easily and confirm my first sighting with the 10" scope. Joe, I wonder whether those reports are made from exceptionally dark sites and sharp, young eyes with a lot of observational experience .... who knows, maybe they are true. But I do't think it's fair to then report it without adding "by the way, I observe from the top of a dark mountain in the middle of a desert."

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    Antonino Carnevali
    Dobs: Zhumell Z10; SpaceWalk 18"; Celestron First Scope(!)
    Altaz reflectors: Vixen R130SF, R150S
    Refractors: Vixen ED115S, ED80SF, A70L; SkyPod go-to mount
    Binoculars: Orion BT70 on VersaGo

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to carnevali For This Useful Post:

    Joe Lalumia (03-15-2011)

  9. #6
    KT4HX's Avatar
    KT4HX is offline HYPER GIANT
    Points: 101,098, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 35.0%
    Achievements:
    365 Days+ Registered Achievement!First 1000 Experience Points750 Days+ Registered Achievement!1000 Days+ Registered Achievement!200+ Posts Achievement!
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    11,765
    Points
    101,098
    Level
    100
    Thanks
    1,432
    Thanked 8,084x 4,352 Posts
    Blog Entries
    200

    Default

    Detecting the brighter galaxies with binoculars is certainly possible, as I have done it and I have older eyes as well. That being said, it was in an area of darker skies than what I have at home, and they are not going to yield up any details. At best most will appear as hazy patches, of varying degrees of brightness from just at the edge of perceptibility using averted vision to readily apparent. I often have to employ tube tapping in order to confirm that the faint fuzz is really there. I truly enjoy star hopping and that is my method of choice to locate objects.

    Using 15X70 binos tripod mounted in what I would guess was a blue zone (for lack of a better description), I was able to pick out the cores of M51 and NGC 5195, M101 (only detectable by tube tapping), M104, M81/82, M65/66, M108, NGC 2841 in the course of one spring evening back in 2009. I also spent a lot of time with open clusters and the brighter globular clusters and only chased after some galaxies to see if I could find them. Despite the minimal visual appearance, I rather enjoyed it. Most of my success was due to locking down the tripod and spending a fair amount of time going over the same FOV. For the ones I did see of course, there were many others I just did not pick up.

    I agree that writers need to qualify their observing conditions better. In the case of O'Meara he at least states that observations for his series of books, for the most part, occured at Mauna Kea, one of the best observing spots in the world.
    Alan || My DSO Blog:
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Astro Sky 17.5 f/4.5 Dob ||
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    f/5 Dob || Zhumell Z10 f/4.9 Dob
    ES AR127 f/6.5 and ES ED80 f/6 on Twilight-II Mount
    ES 82° 24mm, 18mm; Pentax XW 10mm, 7mm, 5mm
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Astronomers: We look into the past to see our future.

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 27
    Last Post: 03-24-2011, 12:40 PM
  2. "Science" Lightweight Addresses "Global Warming" (and Chinese Food)
    By John Steinberg in forum Amateur Astronomy Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-21-2006, 09:33 PM
  3. need email addresses of "Emil Bonnano" and "Perry Remaklus" (MEGASTAR)
    By Michael Feiler in forum General Astronomy Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12-14-2004, 07:23 PM
  4. MEBAY: "Space Frontiers," "Shuttle/Comet," "Secrets of Space"
    By Scott Lowther in forum Space Exploration History Forum
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 11-15-2003, 09:41 PM
  5. E is for easier than expected...
    By justbeats in forum Amateur Astronomy Forum
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 10-30-2003, 12:00 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.0
Powered by vBulletin®
All times are GMT. The time now is 09:29 AM.