Results 1 to 9 of 9
Like Tree12Likes
  • 6 Post By j.gardavsky
  • 2 Post By DeanD
  • 1 Post By j.gardavsky
  • 1 Post By j.gardavsky
  • 1 Post By trynda1701
  • 1 Post By j.gardavsky

Thread: Carl Zeiss Jenoptem 10x50W and 7x50W against Leica, Swarovski, and BA8 binoculars

  1. #1
    j.gardavsky's Avatar
    j.gardavsky is offline Super Moderator
    Points: 111,762, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 38.0%
    Achievements:
    Ghost Achievement! Averaging 5+ posts a day!200+ Posts Achievement!400+ Posts AchievementFirst 1000 Experience Points365 Days+ Registered Achievement!
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    14,419
    Points
    111,762
    Level
    100
    Thanks
    14,422
    Thanked 8,798x 5,726 Posts

    Default Carl Zeiss Jenoptem 10x50W and 7x50W against Leica, Swarovski, and BA8 binoculars



    Hello all,

    the Carl Zeiss Jena binoculars used to be the high quality mass produced binoculars over decades, before having been discontinued in 1990. Their remake has been started by Docter-Optic in Eisfeld in 1991, later replaced by the Docter Nobilem binoculars.
    Finally in May, I have purchased the original Carl Zeiss Jenoptems 10x50W and 7x50W from a friendly dealer in Berlin Charlottenburg-Wilmersdord Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf ? the city district of Berlin?s west - Berlin.de . These both binoculars are in mint technical and optical condition, and they come from the last production series in 1988 and 1989.

    The Carl Zeiss Jena binoculars have been reviewed by Holger Merlitz in Google-Ergebnis für http://www.holgermerlitz.de/octarem/octarem.jpg , including the reprinted catalogue.
    The Jenoptem 7x50W and 10x50W binoculars are an upgraded version of the older Binoctem and Dekarem models.

    Specifications of the Jenoptem binoculars:
    Weight (7x50W and 10x50W): 1010g and 1020g
    Eye relief (7x50W and 10x50W): 12mm and 10mm
    True field of view (7x50W and 10x50W): 7.3° or 128m/1,000m both binoculars
    Apparent field of view (7x50W and 10x50W): 51° and 73°
    Coatings: multicoatings (not FMC) with amber reflections, not repelling dew and rain
    Front lens assembly: cemented achromat with blackened lens rims
    Center focus, dioptre correction on the right eyepiece
    not purged and not waterproof, no retractable eye cups
    L-bracket thread for tripod: not available

    Link to the Swarovski EL Swarovision binoculars: Binoculars EL 42 SWAROVSKI OPTIK
    Link to the Leica Ultravid binoculars: Used Leica 7x42 Ultravid BR Binocular - Black 40260 B&H Photo , http://www.bearbasin.com/leicut.jpg
    Link to the BA8 10.5x70 binoculars: Astro-Physics Inc.

    The attached Fig.1 shows the size comparison of the tested binoculars.

    The Tests

    The both Jenoptem binoculars have been tested against Swarovski EL 8.5x42 Swarovision, Leica Ultravid 7x42 (not HD), and on the night skies against the BA8 10.5x70 binoculars during May and June, some of the tests have been repeated at the beginning of July.
    The question arising is, how compares the optical performance of the 25 years old Jenoptem binoculars with the today's top binoculars, which may cost ten times as much as the old Jenoptems.

    1. First feeling

    The Jenoptem binos are the classical Porro prism binoculars with black armour, and with the metal lens cells painted in black. The 7x50W Jenoptems can be operated hand-held, the 10x50W Jenoptems require some support, at least to support the elbows. Otherwise, they feel quite comfortable. The focusing is smooth without any play, but for me it could be a bit tighter to avoid repeated focus corrections during the handling. The views come easily into the focus, the eyepiece barrels sit nicely on the eyes. The field of view (51°) of the 7x50W Jenoptems is small on today's standards, but still comfortable for concentrated viewing. The extra wide field of view (73°) of the 10x50W Jenoptems offers together with the pin cushion distortion a 'space walk'. The wide opened field stop of the field of view of the 10x50W becomes visible at a shorter eye relief (around 5mm), and it requires to roll the eyes. No blackouts have been found. The both Jenoptems have a short eye relieve - not suited for the glass wearers.

    The 8.5x42 Swarovski offer a very pleasing view, and the sweet spot (free without blackouts) can find my eyes comfortably when the eye cups are fully retracted. The focusing is smooth, but it also could be a little bit tighter. They definitely require some support. The green armour feels like a cheap plastic, and my fingers often become cold during the night observing sessions. The helical retractable eye cups feel a bit flimsy (like the "tin can metal"), especially when I adjust them in dark. My highly subjective point of view: these binoculars deserve the last place in the ergonomy, but definitely the first place due to their optical performance.

    The 7x42 Leica Ultravid are the winner in the ergonomy race, they feel and fit in the hands perfectly well, and they can be operated without any tripod at all. The focusing requires a very fine finger feeling, but then, they'll hold the focus even if put away and later taken back. The sweet spot in the eye relief is for my eyes a couple of millimetres behind the fully retracted eyecups - too short in another words. The eyecup barrels can accommodate the 1.25" nebular filters. That's another differentiator to the Swarovski and to the Jenoptems.

    The 10.5x70 BA8 binoculars are my most frequently used binoculars since years, and hence I might be more used to them. In spite of their big size and weight, I can hold these more steadily then the 10x50W Jenoptems, or even than the 8.5x42 Swarovski. They have a generous eye relief, tight individual focusing, and their large eyepiece barrels can accommodate easily the 1.25" nebular filters.

    2. Reflections on the Multicoatings

    The color and the reflections of the multicoatings are documented in the attached Fig. 2, Fig.3 and Fig.4.
    The front lenses of the both Jenoptems reflect a saturated amber color. The eyepieces reflect amber on the 7x50W, and a slightly less neutral amber hue on the 10x50W.
    The front and the eyepiece lenses on the Leica Ultravid 7x42 reflect less, and the color is more neutral.
    The front lenses on the Swarovski 8.5x42 Swarovision show even less reflections, however the eyepieces reflect more than those on the Leica Ultravid. The reflections are violet-bluish on the front lenses, and greenish on the eyepieces.
    The BA8 10.5x70 binoculars show the blue-green reflections on the front lenses and on the eyepieces, as typical for the BA8 series. The front lens barrels of the BA8 10.5x70 binoculars have densely spaced baffle rings.


    3. Test on the terrestrial objects

    The test reports on the terrestrial objects summarize several repeated daylight observing sessions around my home in May through July, and another couple of terrestrial observing sessions in the Dolomiti mountains during the evening hours in June. These tests do not include all tests on the BA8 10.5x70 binoculars, as I am using these individual focus binoculars for the astronomy only.

    3.1 Definition of details, chromatic aberration (CA), astigmatism and blur in the daylight
    The Swarovski EL 8.5x42 Swarovision are clearly the only binoculars revealing the high definition without astigmatism and blur across the full field of view (64°), and edge to edge. It takes quite a lot of effort to find a tinny green or blue fringe (CA) on the chimney test.
    The Swarovski is followed by the Jenoptem 7x50W with a very good-to-excellent performance across its field of view, which is of course with 51° much smaller than that of Swarovski. These binoculars are practically free from the CA and astigmatism, their optical performance drops slightly within the last 2° - 3° at the edge, when I roll my eyes towards the edge.
    The Leica Ultravid 7x42 perform within the 50° field very sharp, but towards the edge of the field of view, the astigmatism and CA become noticeable.
    The Jenoptem 10x50W are very sharp up to nearly 50°. A thin green fringe becomes visible around 50°, followed by a thin blue fringe around 55°, and then finally followed by the blue/red fringe. The astigmatism becomes visible around 60°. Above 65°, the CA and the astigmatism merge into a small circular blur pattern due to the uncompensated field curvature. These deficiencies are located deep in the peripheral vision, and they require to roll the eyes to fix them. The blur is more noticeable in the near field across several meters, than when the binoculars are focused on the objects far away.

    The CA, whenever fixed with my inspecting eyes in the Jenoptem 10x50W, has been the lateral CA - the sidewise fringing. The lateral CA, has been tested in the segments towards the left and right edge of the field of view, and it is much less visible in the upper and lower segmants - as sometimes observed in the Porro prism binoculars. The longitudinal CA, making the 'fire' around the point light sources, has been tested on the astronomy objects, see section 4.

    The CA in the Leica Ultravid 7x42 and in the both Jenoptems can be considered as being quite well under control, if compared with other binoculars ranging between 8x42 through 10x50 up to 8x56, I have had in my hands, and refused because of the CA.

    3.2 Exit pupil, brightness, contrast, and color in the daylight
    The inspection of the exit pupil is the first thing I am watching for, when taking some binoculars in my hands. The tests have been done by holding the binoculars against the cloudy skies, and watching the eye lenses from a distance around 25cm - 30cm. Some people take a piece of transparent paper to project the light bundle from the eyepiece.

    The Swarovski exit pupil has shown the highest brightness (as expected), followed by Leica, then by the both Jenoptems, and finally by the BA8. The form of the exit pupil is perfectly round in the all tested binoculars, however, the Leica Ultravid is the only binocular free from any stray light patterns around the exit pupil. The bright stray light patterns sideways around the exit pupils in Swarovski are a bit surprising, even if they may finally turn out as not interfering too much. The stray light patterns in the Jenoptems are closer to the exit pupil than in the Swarovski, and they are more pronounced than in the BA8.

    The contrast and the color saturation of the views is highest through the Leica Ultravid (very high contrast and very high color saturation), followed by the Swarovski and closely by the both Jenoptems.

    The Leica Ultravid wins in the long range viewing thanks to the UV cut and a very good protection against the stray skylight. Swarovski reveals a lower color contrast, closely followed by the both Jenoptems.

    The color rendition is strictly neutral through the Swarovski (true color rendition as advertised), followed by Leica. A slightly warmer tone reveal the both Jenoptems, but again, the differences are subtle.

    3.3 Performance after the sunset and during the evening
    These tests have been repeated on several evenings to be sure about the performace differences between the Jenoptems, Leica and Swarovski.
    The color contrast recognition has been tested on different objects painted in light blue, yellow and red, loosely lying around the farm. Shortly after the sunset, all binoculars have shown a good color contrast. The visually perceived color contrast through the all binoculars has decreased with dimmer ambient light, as expected. The first color lost has been the red through the both Jenoptems. The last recognized color has been yellow of the lawn mover through the Swarovski and through the Jenoptem 10x50W.
    Low contrast structures in grey have been found on the slopes of the Fanas Mountains (up to 3,000 m high), across a distance of 3 - 4km. The slopes have been illuminated by the 1/2 Moon. And again, the best view has revealed the 10x50W Jenoptem and the 8.5x42 Swarovski.
    I am tempted to conclude in this case, that the larger magnification has played the decisive role, both in the color recognition, and in the grey contrast recognition.

    4. 1/2 Moon, Mars and Saturn
    The Swarovski reveals very little ghosting, when panning around the Moon, followed by the Leica. The Jenoptem 7x50W shows more ghosting, followed by the extra wide field Jenoptem 10x50W. All tested binoculars show the large craters along the terminator very sharp, and no CA has been apparent when the Moon has been on axis. The best contrast on the dark mare have shown the Leica binoculars.
    Mars has revealed through all binoculars a very small but well defined orange disc.
    Saturn has revealed through all binoculars a white well defined small oval due to its ring.
    The on-axis views of the both planets have been free from CA.
    Looking for the longitudinal CA (different focus settings for red, green and blue) on the planets, Moon, and on the bright stars, has revealed that all tested binoculars can focus the colors red, green and blue very closely (nearly 1 common focus point), contrary to the low budget binoculars, showing a 'fire' around the bright planets and bright stars.

    5. The Deep Sky Objects

    The deep sky objects are in fact the premium targets when using the small binoculars in astronomy, and hence, I have selected several types of the DSOs to find the differences in the performance of the tested binoculars. These tests have been made from my backyard under the clear skies with some bluish brightening, as common during the solstice season on June, the 25th.

    5.1 Globular Clusters
    Both the bright M3 in Canes Venatici, and the faint M71 in Sagitta, have been easily spotted through the all tested binoculars.

    5.2 Galaxies
    The M51 in Canes Venatici has been easily fixed as a little oval through the all tested binoculars.
    The M101 in Ursa Maior has been seen with direct vision through the BA8 10.5x70 and through the Jenoptem 10x50W binoculars. This galaxy has been difficult to keep with averted vision through the Swarovski 8.5x42, and it has been out of reach through the Leica 7x42 and Jenoptem 7x50W binoculars.

    5.3 OIII dominated Nebulae
    As most of the binoculars may already loose some of their maximum light transmission on the blue/green OIII doublet around 500nm, the performance test on the nebulae may reveal, how fast the transmission of light drops.
    The bright Dumbbell Nebula M27 in Vulpecula has been easily fixed through the all tested binoculars.
    The Veil Nebula NGC 6992 - NGC 6995 in Cygnus has been visible through the BA8 10.5x70 and Jenoptem 10x50W binoculars, tough with averted-to-direct vision through the Swarovski 8.5x42 binoculars, and not seen through the Leica 7x42 and Jenoptem 7x50W binoculars.

    5.4 H-Beta dominated Nebulae
    The performance of the binoculars on the blue H-Beta emission line is another important discriminator, as most of the binoculars loose around the wavelength of 486nm 15% - 20% against their maximum transmission of light in green around 540nm.
    The object chosen has been the IC 1396 nebula surrounding the famous Elephant Trunk in Cepheus. The best view have offered the Jenoptem 10x50W binoculars, showing the maximum extension of the nebular glow towards the Garnet Star Mu Cephei. The view might have been amazing also due to the extra wide field offered by the Jenoptem 10x50W. The next best view have offered the BA8 10.5x70 binoculars. The other tested binoculars have failed to reveal the full extension of the nebula.

    5.5 Dark Nebulae
    Viewing the dark nebulae shows the contrast resolution of the binocular (or telescope) optics on the night skies.
    All binoculars have revealed without any problems the north-east extension of the Great Rift (LDN 906) between the bright North America Nebula NGC 7000 and Nu Cygni.
    All binoculars have revealed the Barnard's Dark Cigar Nebula B168, pointing from the open cluster M39 in Cygnus, towards the open cluster NGC 7209 in Lacerta, but the larger magnifications have been performing better.
    The Fish on the Platter dark nebula B144 around Eta Cygni has been visible with the best contrast through the Leica 7x42 binoculars - maybe one of the best views during a couple of past years. The next best performer have been the BA8 10.5x70, followed by the rest of the tested binoculars.

    5.6 Open Clusters
    The easily resolved M39 in Cygnus, and the bit tougher NGC 7243 in Lacerta, have nicely illustrated the advantage of the high definition of the Swarovski 8.5x42 binoculars, showing the cluster stars as 'exact' pin points. These both clusters have been resolved by the all tested binoculars.
    The M52 in Cassiopeia, still low above the horizon, has been the last tested DSO. The embedded orange giant star has been pulled out of the unresolved swarm of the cluster stars through the BA8 10.5x70 and through the Jenoptem 10x50W, with some difficulties through the Swarovski 8.5x42, and not pulled out at all through the other binoculars.

    5.7 Star Fields
    The performance of the binoculars has been tested on the rich star fields in Cygnus. As expected, the Swarovski have offered the best pin point definition across the full field of view (64°). Both, the Leica and Jenoptem 7x50W have shown the stars very sharp within the 50° field of view, followed by the Jenoptem 10x50W within 50°, and finally by the BA8 10.5x70 within 80% of its 52° FOV. The expected blur outside 65° in the Jenoptem 10x50W has been tested when placing the bright stars Alpha and Gamma Cygni close to the opposite edges of the field of view. Even if visible when searching for the blur, it has not distracted me from enjoying the views in the extra wide field of 73°.

    Conclusions

    While these tests are biased by different magnifications and by different apertures of the binoculars, and as well as by the choice of objects tested, all binoculars tested here can be regarded from the point of view of their optics as very good to excellent performers. One can find for each of these binoculars some specific deep sky objects, where the particular binocular optics perform best.

    The Swarovski EL 8.5x42 Swarovision are the most expensive binoculars in the tested set. They excel in the high definition edge-to-edge sharpness across 64°, and hence they are often the first choice for the perfectionists among the birders, and among the people watching the bugs. On the night skies they offer amazing sharp stars, and they may easily show one half or even more of the Messier objects. These are the binoculars having their place on my desk. I am using and enjoying these binoculars since 2013.
    The Leica Ultravid 7x42 excel with their very high contrast and color saturation, both in the near field and in the long range viewing. I'd rate them as the best choice for watching the events and sports, even if they have their most significant community of users among the birders. In astronomy, they offer amazing views on the very large objects, like the Barnard's Loop, and on the bright and dark clouds along the Milky Way. Last, but not least, the slim 1.25" Astronomik nebula filters can be easily pushed into their eye cups, and removed again. Regarding their price tag, they are behind the Swarovski, but not far behind. I have been using these binoculars since many years.
    The BA8 10.5x70 binoculars are my preferred astronomy binoculars in their class of aperture and size. They are not budget binoculars, but for the astronomy use, they are worth of having. Their large eyepiece barrels accommodate easily the 1.25" filters, when you apply some DIY skills to fasten the filters safely. These binoculars are my companions during the deep sky objects hunting since many years. The next similarly sized Fujinons cost about three times as much.
    The Jenoptem 10x50W and 7x50W - they have surprised me with their very good optical performance, and how they compare with the top today's binoculars. The views through the Jenoptem 7x50W are nice, and they will do a great job under the clear and very dark skies on the extended deep sky objects requiring large exit pupils. Thanks to the larger magnification of the 10x50W Jenoptems, these reveal the same ultimate details with high contrast on many terrestrial objects, like flowers, spider webs, etc, as the smaller 8.5x42 Swarovski. The extra wide field of the Jenoptem 10x50W offers a nice feeling of the space walk, both on the terrestrial objects and on the night skies.
    The both Jenoptems are traded typically for 150 USD - 200 USD, depending on their condition. The collector's value Jenoptems achieve higher prices Fernglser @ Optikhandel & Service Torsten Schilling

    Thanks for reading,

    JG

    PS: Regarding the differences in performance between the binoculars, what matters and what doesn't matter, read the comments by Cameron Cox in "Zeiss Victory 7x42 T* FL" vs "Leica Ultravid 7x42 HD" - BirdForum
    markan, CamelHat, DeanD and 3 others like this.
    Binoculars: Leica Ultravid 7x42, 8x42HD; Swarovski EL 8.5x42 Swarovision; Nikon 10x70 Astroluxe; Docter Nobilem 7x50 Porro; Jenoptem 7x50W, 10x50W; BA8: 10.5x70, 15x85; 25x100FB, AsahiPentax 8x40, Refractors: Sky-Watcher 150mm/750mm; Leica APO Televid 82mm (25x-50x WW ASPH); EPs:Baader Classic Orthos; Fujiyama ortho, Leica B WW, ultrawide zoom ASPH, Periplan GF, HC Plan S, L; DOCTER UWA; Wild UW mil; Tele Vue Delos, Nagler Zoom, Plössls; Swarovski SW; Pentax XW; ZEISS diascope B WW T*, Carl Zeiss E-Pl; Hensoldt mil; Filters: Astrodon, Astronomik, Baader (CCD), TS; Astrophotography: AstroTrac; Leica R7: Leica 2/50, 2/90mm, 2.8/180mm lenses
    Astronomy Forum Rules and Terms of Service
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.

  2. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to j.gardavsky For This Useful Post:

    CamelHat (07-14-2014),DeanD (07-15-2014),JFD (07-30-2014),markan (07-16-2014),perigny270 (07-15-2014),Rayskipro (07-14-2014),trynda1701 (07-16-2014)

  3. #2
    DeanD's Avatar
    DeanD is offline HYPER GIANT
    Points: 16,694, Level: 89
    Level completed: 27%, Points required for next Level: 256
    Overall activity: 19.0%
    Achievements:
    365 Days+ Registered Achievement!2 Posts Achievement20 Posts Achievement!50 Posts Achievement!750 Days+ Registered Achievement!
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    2,375
    Points
    16,694
    Level
    89
    Thanks
    280
    Thanked 734x 598 Posts

    Default Re: Carl Zeiss Jenoptem 10x50W and 7x50W against Leica, Swarovski, and BA8 binoculars

    Thanks for this JG! You are building an impressing collection of glass! The Jenoptems sound like excellent value for money- and they look pristine despite their age; you had a great find there.
    I would love to have a look at some BA8's and compare them with my 11x80 Cartons, so I will have to keep an eye out for some. (I have used the Williams 10x50's, which I suspect are very similar to the BA8 line, but not the larger 70mm ones). Your comments on the Leica 7x42's confirmed my impression of them when I had a look a while back: did you notice any field curvature towards the edge? I found in daylight that this was quite pronounced when compared to a pair of Swarovski's, and even compared to my (much cheaper) Vanguard Endeavour's.
    I would love some Swarovski's as I am a big fan of sharp images right across the field, but I don't think that is ever going to happen...
    Thanks again for the report, and happy viewing!

    All the best,

    Dean
    j.gardavsky and JFD like this.

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    :
    12" home-made dob, Celestron 150 f5, Tak TSA102, TV 76, Celestron 800CPC, ETX 125
    Mounts:
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    MiniTower, HEQ5Pro
    Binos: 25x100FB, Carton 11x80, Vanguard Endeavour 1045, Takahashi 22x60, Swarovski Habicht 8x30
    Eyepieces: My favourites are my Televue 32mm plossl, Nagler 13mm T6, Nagler 3-6mm

  4. #3
    j.gardavsky's Avatar
    j.gardavsky is offline Super Moderator
    Points: 111,762, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 38.0%
    Achievements:
    Ghost Achievement! Averaging 5+ posts a day!200+ Posts Achievement!400+ Posts AchievementFirst 1000 Experience Points365 Days+ Registered Achievement!
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    14,419
    Points
    111,762
    Level
    100
    Thanks
    14,422
    Thanked 8,798x 5,726 Posts

    Default Re: Carl Zeiss Jenoptem 10x50W and 7x50W against Leica, Swarovski, and BA8 binoculars

    Hello Dean,

    the Leica Ultravid 7x42 have a pin cushion distortion - similarly to the Jenoptem 7x50W.
    The Swarovski EL 8.5x42 are nearly distortion free, or showing a slight globe-type distortion. Some people have reported getting sea sick when panning with the Swaro binoculars.

    The Leica Ultravid 7x42 does not fully compensate the field curvature. The design of their eyepieces seems to have concentrated on the maximum contrast and on the maximum color saturation at the cost of some other uncompensated issues, in order to achieve a differentiator to the Zeiss Victory Fl T* 7x42, I guess.

    As I have had a mass of binoculars in my hands, I'd say, the top notch binoculars perform perfectly well within the center field of 50°, revealing always some performance drop outside. This holds as well as for the Swarovski: when I want, I can always find a very high contrast test object where they reveal a faint lateral bluish CA outside the 50° to my critically inspecting eyes. However, this does not lower the high defintion performance of the excellent Swarovski binoculars, and I love them very much.

    Best,

    JG
    JFD likes this.
    Binoculars: Leica Ultravid 7x42, 8x42HD; Swarovski EL 8.5x42 Swarovision; Nikon 10x70 Astroluxe; Docter Nobilem 7x50 Porro; Jenoptem 7x50W, 10x50W; BA8: 10.5x70, 15x85; 25x100FB, AsahiPentax 8x40, Refractors: Sky-Watcher 150mm/750mm; Leica APO Televid 82mm (25x-50x WW ASPH); EPs:Baader Classic Orthos; Fujiyama ortho, Leica B WW, ultrawide zoom ASPH, Periplan GF, HC Plan S, L; DOCTER UWA; Wild UW mil; Tele Vue Delos, Nagler Zoom, Plössls; Swarovski SW; Pentax XW; ZEISS diascope B WW T*, Carl Zeiss E-Pl; Hensoldt mil; Filters: Astrodon, Astronomik, Baader (CCD), TS; Astrophotography: AstroTrac; Leica R7: Leica 2/50, 2/90mm, 2.8/180mm lenses
    Astronomy Forum Rules and Terms of Service
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to j.gardavsky For This Useful Post:

    DeanD (07-15-2014)

  6. #4
    DeanD's Avatar
    DeanD is offline HYPER GIANT
    Points: 16,694, Level: 89
    Level completed: 27%, Points required for next Level: 256
    Overall activity: 19.0%
    Achievements:
    365 Days+ Registered Achievement!2 Posts Achievement20 Posts Achievement!50 Posts Achievement!750 Days+ Registered Achievement!
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    2,375
    Points
    16,694
    Level
    89
    Thanks
    280
    Thanked 734x 598 Posts

    Default Re: Carl Zeiss Jenoptem 10x50W and 7x50W against Leica, Swarovski, and BA8 binoculars

    Thanks JG,

    If at any time you fall out of love with your Swarovskis, I'll be happy to take them off your hands!

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    :
    12" home-made dob, Celestron 150 f5, Tak TSA102, TV 76, Celestron 800CPC, ETX 125
    Mounts:
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    MiniTower, HEQ5Pro
    Binos: 25x100FB, Carton 11x80, Vanguard Endeavour 1045, Takahashi 22x60, Swarovski Habicht 8x30
    Eyepieces: My favourites are my Televue 32mm plossl, Nagler 13mm T6, Nagler 3-6mm

  7. #5
    j.gardavsky's Avatar
    j.gardavsky is offline Super Moderator
    Points: 111,762, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 38.0%
    Achievements:
    Ghost Achievement! Averaging 5+ posts a day!200+ Posts Achievement!400+ Posts AchievementFirst 1000 Experience Points365 Days+ Registered Achievement!
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    14,419
    Points
    111,762
    Level
    100
    Thanks
    14,422
    Thanked 8,798x 5,726 Posts

    Default Re: Carl Zeiss Jenoptem 10x50W and 7x50W against Leica, Swarovski, and BA8 binoculars

    Hello Dean,

    I'll talk within 2 months to one friendly dealer about the price of the Leica Ultravid 10x50 HD - it is a candidate to replace my 8.5x42 EL Swaro.
    Then, let's see, maybe I'll drop you a PM, and you'll be welcome to come to Germany and take the Swaro off my hands. Little favours make the friends.

    Best,

    JG
    DeanD likes this.
    Binoculars: Leica Ultravid 7x42, 8x42HD; Swarovski EL 8.5x42 Swarovision; Nikon 10x70 Astroluxe; Docter Nobilem 7x50 Porro; Jenoptem 7x50W, 10x50W; BA8: 10.5x70, 15x85; 25x100FB, AsahiPentax 8x40, Refractors: Sky-Watcher 150mm/750mm; Leica APO Televid 82mm (25x-50x WW ASPH); EPs:Baader Classic Orthos; Fujiyama ortho, Leica B WW, ultrawide zoom ASPH, Periplan GF, HC Plan S, L; DOCTER UWA; Wild UW mil; Tele Vue Delos, Nagler Zoom, Plössls; Swarovski SW; Pentax XW; ZEISS diascope B WW T*, Carl Zeiss E-Pl; Hensoldt mil; Filters: Astrodon, Astronomik, Baader (CCD), TS; Astrophotography: AstroTrac; Leica R7: Leica 2/50, 2/90mm, 2.8/180mm lenses
    Astronomy Forum Rules and Terms of Service
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.

  8. #6
    trynda1701's Avatar
    trynda1701 is offline Main Sequence
    Points: 4,144, Level: 43
    Level completed: 30%, Points required for next Level: 106
    Overall activity: 0%
    Achievements:
    2 Posts Achievement20 Posts Achievement!5 Threads Achievement!50 Posts Achievement!First 1000 Experience Points
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    UK, Sol 3, Orion Spur, Perseus Arm, Milky Way Galaxy, Local Group
    Posts
    59
    Points
    4,144
    Level
    43
    Thanks
    169
    Thanked 9x 9 Posts

    Default Re: Carl Zeiss Jenoptem 10x50W and 7x50W against Leica, Swarovski, and BA8 binoculars

    I've had my Jenoptem 10x50W's since about 1989 or so, and with the infrequency that I manage to get clear skies agreeing with family life and work, they have done me admirable all that time.

    Yes, they have the outer edge of field issues, but like others have said, it doesn't detract too much from that wide field of view.

    Mark
    j.gardavsky likes this.

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    : Celestron C8 Classic (Black - 1990?),
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    Heritage 130P (2014)
    Eps: 24mm, 16mm ES Maxvision 68° Panoptics; 18mm, 12mm, 8mm BST Explorer 60° Plossls; 25mm Celestron Kellner; 40mm, 9mm Japanese Kellners; 25mm, 10mm Skywatchers; Skywatcher 2x
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    .
    Binocs: Helios Apollo HR 15x70 (2016). CZJ Jenoptem 10x50W (1989?), Manfrotto 679B Monopod (2013), DynaSun WT011H TriggerGrip Ballhead (2013), Vanguard Tripod [T-120223AB] (1989?). Olympus 8x40 DPS I (2015). Halina Discovery 8x30 [2 pairs].

  9. #7
    trynda1701's Avatar
    trynda1701 is offline Main Sequence
    Points: 4,144, Level: 43
    Level completed: 30%, Points required for next Level: 106
    Overall activity: 0%
    Achievements:
    2 Posts Achievement20 Posts Achievement!5 Threads Achievement!50 Posts Achievement!First 1000 Experience Points
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    UK, Sol 3, Orion Spur, Perseus Arm, Milky Way Galaxy, Local Group
    Posts
    59
    Points
    4,144
    Level
    43
    Thanks
    169
    Thanked 9x 9 Posts

    Default Re: Carl Zeiss Jenoptem 10x50W and 7x50W against Leica, Swarovski, and BA8 binoculars

    Oops, somehow sent the post twice!

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    : Celestron C8 Classic (Black - 1990?),
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    Heritage 130P (2014)
    Eps: 24mm, 16mm ES Maxvision 68° Panoptics; 18mm, 12mm, 8mm BST Explorer 60° Plossls; 25mm Celestron Kellner; 40mm, 9mm Japanese Kellners; 25mm, 10mm Skywatchers; Skywatcher 2x
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    .
    Binocs: Helios Apollo HR 15x70 (2016). CZJ Jenoptem 10x50W (1989?), Manfrotto 679B Monopod (2013), DynaSun WT011H TriggerGrip Ballhead (2013), Vanguard Tripod [T-120223AB] (1989?). Olympus 8x40 DPS I (2015). Halina Discovery 8x30 [2 pairs].

  10. #8
    DeanD's Avatar
    DeanD is offline HYPER GIANT
    Points: 16,694, Level: 89
    Level completed: 27%, Points required for next Level: 256
    Overall activity: 19.0%
    Achievements:
    365 Days+ Registered Achievement!2 Posts Achievement20 Posts Achievement!50 Posts Achievement!750 Days+ Registered Achievement!
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    2,375
    Points
    16,694
    Level
    89
    Thanks
    280
    Thanked 734x 598 Posts

    Default Re: Carl Zeiss Jenoptem 10x50W and 7x50W against Leica, Swarovski, and BA8 binoculars

    Quote Originally Posted by j.gardavsky View Post
    Hello Dean,

    I'll talk within 2 months to one friendly dealer about the price of the Leica Ultravid 10x50 HD - it is a candidate to replace my 8.5x42 EL Swaro.
    Then, let's see, maybe I'll drop you a PM, and you'll be welcome to come to Germany and take the Swaro off my hands. Little favours make the friends.

    Best,

    JG
    Sounds interesting... Unfortunately I don't expect to be able to get to Germany any time in the foreseeable future.

    My son lives in London and goes to Berlin quite often to do DJ gigs. He tells us that Berlin is a wonderful city.

    Looking the other way round though: I would be more than happy to show you our wonderful Outback skies if you ever happen to visit Adelaide!

    Happy viewing,

    Dean

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    :
    12" home-made dob, Celestron 150 f5, Tak TSA102, TV 76, Celestron 800CPC, ETX 125
    Mounts:
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    MiniTower, HEQ5Pro
    Binos: 25x100FB, Carton 11x80, Vanguard Endeavour 1045, Takahashi 22x60, Swarovski Habicht 8x30
    Eyepieces: My favourites are my Televue 32mm plossl, Nagler 13mm T6, Nagler 3-6mm

  11. #9
    j.gardavsky's Avatar
    j.gardavsky is offline Super Moderator
    Points: 111,762, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 38.0%
    Achievements:
    Ghost Achievement! Averaging 5+ posts a day!200+ Posts Achievement!400+ Posts AchievementFirst 1000 Experience Points365 Days+ Registered Achievement!
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    14,419
    Points
    111,762
    Level
    100
    Thanks
    14,422
    Thanked 8,798x 5,726 Posts

    Default Re: Carl Zeiss Jenoptem 10x50W and 7x50W against Leica, Swarovski, and BA8 binoculars

    Quote Originally Posted by DeanD View Post
    ...
    Looking the other way round though: I would be more than happy to show you our wonderful Outback skies if you ever happen to visit Adelaide!

    Happy viewing,

    Dean
    Hello Dean,

    that sounds interesting. Coming over to Australia once in the future is my old dream: the skies, the opals, the fossil wood.

    Best,

    JG
    DeanD likes this.
    Binoculars: Leica Ultravid 7x42, 8x42HD; Swarovski EL 8.5x42 Swarovision; Nikon 10x70 Astroluxe; Docter Nobilem 7x50 Porro; Jenoptem 7x50W, 10x50W; BA8: 10.5x70, 15x85; 25x100FB, AsahiPentax 8x40, Refractors: Sky-Watcher 150mm/750mm; Leica APO Televid 82mm (25x-50x WW ASPH); EPs:Baader Classic Orthos; Fujiyama ortho, Leica B WW, ultrawide zoom ASPH, Periplan GF, HC Plan S, L; DOCTER UWA; Wild UW mil; Tele Vue Delos, Nagler Zoom, Plössls; Swarovski SW; Pentax XW; ZEISS diascope B WW T*, Carl Zeiss E-Pl; Hensoldt mil; Filters: Astrodon, Astronomik, Baader (CCD), TS; Astrophotography: AstroTrac; Leica R7: Leica 2/50, 2/90mm, 2.8/180mm lenses
    Astronomy Forum Rules and Terms of Service
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 06-21-2008, 01:06 AM
  2. FS: Jenoptem Zeiss 7x50 binoculars - perfect for low light observations
    By Curious_Orange in forum UK Astronomy Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-28-2006, 01:57 PM
  3. Swarovski EL & Zeiss Victory 12x binos : page up
    By Roland Herrera in forum UK Astronomy Forum
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 11-08-2005, 08:12 PM
  4. From Zeiss to Swarovski EL 8.5
    By Roland Herrera in forum UK Astronomy Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 09-26-2003, 12:40 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.0
Powered by vBulletin®
All times are GMT. The time now is 12:57 PM.