Results 1 to 8 of 8
Like Tree18Likes
  • 11 Post By KT4HX
  • 1 Post By combat48
  • 1 Post By Mark Moyer
  • 1 Post By John Baars
  • 2 Post By KT4HX
  • 1 Post By combat48
  • 1 Post By KT4HX

Thread: Observing Report for 02 June 2019 - galaxies and more through the muck

  1. #1
    KT4HX's Avatar
    KT4HX is offline HYPER GIANT
    Points: 104,702, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 16.0%
    Achievements:
    365 Days+ Registered Achievement!First 1000 Experience Points750 Days+ Registered Achievement!1000 Days+ Registered Achievement!200+ Posts Achievement!
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    11,786
    Points
    104,702
    Level
    100
    Thanks
    1,443
    Thanked 8,098x 4,361 Posts
    Blog Entries
    200

    Default Observing Report for 02 June 2019 - galaxies and more through the muck



    I was back at the dark site for a couple of evenings of observing (conditions permitting of course) while my days were filled with work around the property (cutting this, hauling that, fixing this, breaking that!). The forecast for the first evening was not terrific by any means. It was calling for below normal transparency, and given that wed had some heavy downpours during the afternoon I expected at least some fog would make an appearance.

    The sky was so-so between 2130 and 2200 but I went ahead and rolled the 17.5 dob out of the garage and set up my accessories. I went ahead and aligned the Rigel Quikfinder and 8x50 RACI on Spica so that I would be ready to go if and when possible. Though conditions were obviously compromised and some clouds were in the offing, I went ahead and starting trying to plow a row or two. I noticed Corvus hanging in the southern sky and turned to chart 69-right. Pointing the scope at the wide pair of Delta (mag 2.9) and Eta (mag 4.3) Corvi, I made the quick sweep up to the northwestern corner of the celestial crow, near its border with Virgo.

    Observations were made with the 18mm (110x), 11mm (181x) and initially I also used the 6.7mm (297x), but after a time I dropped back to the 8.8mm (226x) due to the poor conditions. As always all surface brightness data (SBr) is expressed in terms of magnitudes per square arc min (mag/arcmin2). The field reference, as normal, was the Interstellarum Deep-Sky Atlas (IDSA). With that, lets get rolling.

    NGC 4782 (Corvus, elliptical galaxy, mag=11.7, size=1.8x1.7, SBr=12.9):
    NGC 4783 (Corvus, elliptical galaxy, mag=11.5, size=1.8x1.7, SBr=12.8):
    This is a contact pair catalogued as Vorontsov-Velyaminov 201 (VV-201). Basically the pair appeared as two bright knots (nuclei) within the same envelope. Overall it was small and bright, with its dominant core within a tiny halo that overlapped with that of NGC 4783. Viewed at 110x to 297x, the overall presentation remained the same, of two distinct cores each having their own small haloes, but wrapped together within a single cocoon of diffuse glow. NGC 4782 is the southern of the pair, with NGC 4783 attached at the hip to its north.

    NGC 4714 (Corvus, lenticular galaxy, mag=12.7, size=1.6x1.2, SBr=13.3):
    Slipping northward I picked up this lenticular at 110x. I found it a small slight oval that was a little bright in appearance. Overall it was homogenous, with no trace of central brightness. Nothing changed at 181x, but at 297x I detected an intermittent stellar core buried within its middle.

    NGC 4727 (Corvus, barred spiral galaxy, mag=13.0, size=1.4x1.1, SBr=12.8):
    NGC 4724 (Corvus, lentiucular galaxy, mag=13.9, size=0.9x0.5, SBr=12.9):
    Originally discovered by William Herschel in 1785, NGC 4727, was rediscovered by Lewis Swift in 1887and later erroneously added to the New General Catalogue as NGC 4740. The pair form a contact pair, and I noted the double core of the two at 110x. They presented as a dim oval with two bright knots within the same envelope. NGC 4727 was the larger of the pair overall, having a slightly more extended halo of its own, and appeared more diffuse. NGC 4724 was smaller and contained a stellar core. They were observed with 181x and 297x as well.

    IC 3827 (Corvus, spiral galaxy, mag=13.4, size=1.0x0.7, SBr=12.8):
    I found this dim rounded dust bunny within the same field of view of IC 3831 just to its southeast. At 110x this spiral was subtle, rounded in shape and small. Even at 181x and 297x it was quite weak in the field.

    IC 3831 (Corvus, lenticular galaxy, mag=12.6, size=1.4x0.9, SBr=12.8):
    Just southeast of IC 3827, it was likewise small and round and dim, though brighter than its neighbor. Observed at 110x to 297x it remained a homogenous diffuse glow that appeared ghostly in the field of view.
    I tried for a couple other galaxies nearby, but struck out so moved eastward a little, crossing into Virgo.

    NGC 5044 (Virgo, elliptical galaxy, mag=10.8, size=3.0x3.0, SBr=13.2):
    I noted in the IDSA on chart 69-left a small box designated for chart D12, which is part of the detailed charts in the back of the atlas. Turning there, I studied the field for the NGC 5035 Group. Large and round, NGC 5044 seemed a little subdued by the conditions and not as boldly bright as one might expect, though very easily seen at 110x. As with most ellipticals increasing magnification (181x and 297x) added little to its appearance other than an intermittent stellar core.

    NGC 5054 (Virgo, spiral galaxy, mag=10.9, size=5.1x3.0, SBr=13.7):
    About 27 southeast of the previous object I easily picked up this bright and large titled spiral. Though a bit tame in its presence in the field of view, it was nonetheless easily seen at 110x. I found it homogenous through all magnifications with not a hint of central brightness.

    NGC 5046 (Virgo, elliptical galaxy, mag=12.9, size=0.8x0.7, SBr=12.1):
    The next one up in the NGC 5035 Group was this little pip of light 6 northeast of NGC 5044. Picked up at 110x it was small, dim and quite diffuse in appearance. Again, being an elliptical, while it became more readily apparent in the FOV, it revealed no additional details at higher magnification.

    NGC 5049 (Virgo, lenticular galaxy, mag=13.0, size=1.9x0.6, SBr=13.0):
    A little over 5 southeast of NGC 5046 I picked up this very small and thin ray of light. Pretty dim at all magnifications, it was a weak presence in the field.

    NGC 5035 (Virgo, barred lenticular galaxy, mag=12.8, size=1.4x1.1, SBr=13.2):
    About 10.5 southwest of NGC 5044 I pulled down (barely) small rounded puff of smoke. Overall I found it difficult at all magnifications, which hinted that conditions were on the way downhill, so I moved on.

    Looking around, I could see clouds were afoot, as well as the telltale signs of fog coming off the launching pad. Recalling a post in the past few days where someone mentioned trying for the globulars NGC 5053 and M53 in Coma, I decided to see if I could pay a quick visit since it had been a while since I last looked at them.

    NGC 5053 (Coma Berenices, globular cluster, mag=9.0, size=10.0, SBr=13.7, class=11):
    NGC 5053, always a bugaboo for many folks because of its low surface brightness, was easily picked up at 110x. I will qualify that by saying it was still its normal subtle self, but I know what to expect from this Class 11 globular, so my eye easily picked up its large and round diffuse glow in the field. At 110x I noted about 10 to 12 stars resolved across its face, overlaying the milky glow of its many unresolved members.

    Messier 53 / NGC 5024 (Coma Berenices, globular cluster, mag=7.7, size=13.0, SBr=12.7, class=5):
    Quickly moving to M53 at 110x, It was a welcome change from NGC 5053, with its bright round glow. However, I only noticed about the same number of stars resolved in the view, and as I watched, the cluster vanished. Looking up, I saw the reason clouds and fog. So at this point I took a half hour break to grab a snack and see if things changed for the better or worse.

    Coming back out things looked improved, as did the view of M53 when I returned to it. Many stars were now resolved across its dimension. It exhibited its typical bright central concentration, surrounded by a diffuse halo, extending outward in picturesque fashion.

    SN 2019ein (Canes Venatici, supernova in galaxy NGC 5353):
    Since I was going after a new supernova in Canes Venatici this evening, I decided to stop by this one that Id observed a couple of times last week from this site. Retracing my steps from last week I quickly landed on its field in NGC 5353, part of the Hickson Compact Galaxy Group number 68. Though definitely dimmer than the previous week, it was still visible at 110x, and especially so at 181x. Though I didnt do any comparisons, I would judge it to be in the dimmer end of the 14th mag range now.

    SN 2019fck (Canes Venatici, supernova in galaxy NGC 5243):
    This new supernova was up next. Using the same chart as for the previous object, IDSA 21-left, I moved from Hickson 68 about 4 to the southwest to pick up a curved north-south line of three bright field stars with 25 CVn at its southern end. Studying the field east of the northern two of the three, I quickly discerned the galaxy and its newcomer at 110x. The supernova was quickly spotted north of the galaxys northwestern tip, removed from its main glow, as seen in images. It was definitely more apparent than is SN 2019ein, and I would judge it to be in the middle to upper part of the 14th magnitude range.

    NGC 5243 (Canes Venatici, spiral galaxy, mag=13.1, size=1.5x0.4, SBr=12.5):
    Since the host galaxy of SN 2019fck was not in my log, I took a few minutes to give it a look. At 110x it was dim and small, a thin sliver of light. Viewed at 181x it remained weak in the field and diffuse in appearance. Not much to see really, but the SN made it worth the trip.

    NGC 5303 (Canes Venatici, spiral galaxy, mag=12.6, size=0.9x0.4, SBr=11.5):
    MCG+7-28-66 / NGC 5303B (Canes Venatici, spiral galaxy, mag=14.6, size=0.7x0.3, SBr=12.6):

    After picking up the two SNe in Canes Venatici, I decided to poke around for some new galaxies in the general vicinity. I noticed this designated as NGC 5303A in the IDSA, which tells me there is at least one other galaxy in close attendance. At 110x I found a somewhat dim diffuse glow with two knots involved. Studying the field at 110x up to 297x, I noticed two distinct objects here beyond just the pair of knots. Both were diffuse in general, but each sported a tiny bright core area.

    NGC 5351 (Canes Venatici, barred spiral galaxy, mag=12.1, size=3.0x1.5, SBr=13.6):
    Nudging southeast a few minutes, I easily picked up this small oval at 110x. A little bright to the eye, it was homogenous in overall appearance. The view at 181x remained the same. However, I felt I noticed a small diffuse presence just south of this barred spiral and let my eye drift that direction.

    IC 4341 (Canes Venatici, spiral galaxy, mag=13.9, size=0.7x0.7, SBr=12.9):
    This object is erroneously labeled as IC 4339 in the IDSA, and the two identifiers are not for the same object. The discoverer Stephane Javelle (1897) observed what would become IC 4341 on two consecutive evenings and on the second one noted the star and designated it as his #1276, which Dreyer later inserted into the Index Catalogue by mistake as IC 4339. Therefore the latter designation, seen in the IDSA, is incorrect and non-existent.

    Be all that as it may, it was suspected at 110x and was positively confirmed at 181x, with 226x not adding anything to the view. Overall it was small and round, and very dim in the field. Overall diffuse showing no signs of central brightness. Weak and a little difficult under the conditions.

    NGC 5378 (Canes Venatici, barred spiral galaxy, mag=12.5, size=2.6x2.1, SBr=14.2):
    Next up was this small round diffuse glow. Overall it was a little bright to the eye at 110x, and it remained homogenous even up to 226x.

    NGC 5380 (Canes Venatici, lenticular galaxy, mag=12.3, size=1.7x1.7, SBr=13.3):
    Immediately south of NGC 5378, I noticed another slightly bright rounded glow. Small in appearance, it did present a stellar core at 110x and 181x. It shared the FOV with the previous object.

    NGC 5395 (Canes Venatici, spiral galaxy, mag=11.4, size=2.9x1.5, SBr=12.8):
    NGC 5394 (Canes Venatici, barred spiral galaxy/peculiar, mag=13.0, size=1.7x1.0, SBr=13.4):
    Next up was this interacting pair known as Arp 84. Oriented in a north-south fashion, NGC 5395 is the southern of the two. Visually it seemed slightly large at 110x and a was little bright in appearance. It seemed slightly elongated and homogenous in character. At 181x it displayed a broad brightness within its center.

    NGC 5394 is the northern of the duo. I found it a small and rounded knot pinned to the glow of NGC 5395, reminding me of a tick stuck to a dog. Visually it definitely played second string to NGC 5395, but was clearly observed at all magnifications

    NGC 5352 (Canes Venatici, lenticular galaxy, mag=13.0, size=1.2x1.0, SBr=13.1):
    SSW of the previous pair toward a distorted S pattern of dimmer field stars I located this lenticular. At 110x it presented as very small and slightly oval. Overall it was a little dim, but exhibited a stellar core. Viewed at 181x it became more apparent in the field, but was not strongly in command of the field.

    NGC 5406 (Canes Venatici, barred spiral galaxy, mag=12.3, size=1.9x1.4, SBr=13.3):
    Swingng back NNW of the Arp 84 pair, I reeled in this small ellipse. Overall it was a little bright at 110x showing a broadly brighter center. The view at 181x was pretty much the same, with no additional details noted. A mag 6.6 field star lay just north of the galaxy in the field, which impacted the views slightly.

    NGC 5407 (Canes Venatici, elliptical galaxy, mag=13.2, size=1.4x1.0, SBr=13.4):
    Just north of the previous object, on the other side of the bright field star I had some difficulty initially locating this small rounded pip of light. The glare from the field star was problematic at 110x. Then at 181x I confirmed its presence in the field as a diffuse glow with a stellar core pinned to its center.

    Fatigue from working during the daylight hours and dealing with the poor transparency was finally getting the better of me. After about two and a half hours of observing, I finally decided to draw it to a close. So I headed back to western Cygnus to try my luck in the poor conditions. The Milky Way was clearly evident, however, it was quite weak in appearance, attesting to the poor conditions. The sky was simply not vibrant and didnt pack its normal visual punch from this location. So it was time to wrap it up.

    NGC 6783 (Cygnus, compact galaxy, mag=14.3, size=0.3x0.3, SBr=13.1):
    Turning to chart 18-left, I decided to try for a couple more galaxies to round out the evening. Star hopping WNW about 5 to a square of four stars almost at the Lyra border, I studied the field to its south. I did not detect anything at 110x, but at 181x I suspected a small and very dim rounded dust mote. I confirmed its presence in the field at 226x, but it was quite weak visually.

    NGC 6792 (Lyra, barred spiral galaxy, mag=12.1, size=2.2x1.3, SBr=13.1):
    Sliding south from the previous object nearly 3, I located this diffuse puff of light west of a line of three bright field stars. At 110x it was a dim and small homogenous oval, though it was visually poor. At 181x its presence was better affirmed within the field of view as a small diffuse glow. Even at 226x it remained somewhat subtle to the eye, though it display a weak broad brightness in its center.

    With those last two objects I rolled the big feller back into the garage and quickly stowed my other stuff. I had a quick bite, then got ready for bed. I have been fatigued many times while galaxy hunting. This comes from being so focused on the task that it does drain ones mind and body. This was a little different. There was some of that, but also dealing with poorer conditions causes frustration, which adds to the good fatigue one gets from finding and observing galaxies. But, I live to observe another night, and hopefully the second one will be an improvement over the first. Thanks for riding along, and will see you back out there tomorrow night. In the meantime, keep looking up!
    Alan || My DSO Blog:
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Astro Sky 17.5 f/4.5 Dob || Apertura AD12 f/5 Dob || Zhumell Z10 f/4.9 Dob
    ES AR127 f/6.5 and ES ED80 f/6 on Twilight-II Mount
    ES 82 24mm, 18mm; Pentax XW 10mm, 7mm, 5mm
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Astronomers: We look into the past to see our future.

  2. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to KT4HX For This Useful Post:

    bladekeeper (06-06-2019),combat48 (06-06-2019),Gabby76 (06-05-2019),ic_1101 (06-07-2019),John Baars (06-06-2019),kanadalainen (06-06-2019),kingclinton (06-06-2019)

  3. #2
    combat48's Avatar
    combat48 is offline HYPER GIANT
    Points: 42,806, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 99.8%
    Achievements:
    2 Posts Achievement20 Posts Achievement!Gallery Achievement!Album Achievement!50 Posts Achievement!
    Awards:
    3rd Most Active Award
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Culpeper, VA, USA
    Posts
    6,482
    Points
    42,806
    Level
    100
    Thanks
    2,981
    Thanked 2,710x 1,910 Posts

    Default Re: Observing Report for 02 June 2019 - galaxies and more through the muck

    Another nice selection of "opportunities", Alan! Don and I spent a few hours on 3 Jun taking in some of your Libra objects (NGC 5793, NGC 5863, NGC 5897, NGC 5745, NGC 5741, NGC 5595, NGC 5597, NGC 5728, IC 1077) with the 30 inch Obsession. We plan to use this latest list next good opportunity.

    Dave
    KT4HX likes this.
    Unitron Refractors (60mm, 75mm, 102mm, and 125mm); Stellarvue SV110ED; Brandon 94; Zeiss Telementor T-1

    "Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better." Albert Einstein

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to combat48 For This Useful Post:

    KT4HX (06-06-2019)

  5. #3
    Mark Moyer's Avatar
    Mark Moyer is offline HYPER GIANT
    Points: 13,745, Level: 80
    Level completed: 85%, Points required for next Level: 55
    Overall activity: 0%
    Achievements:
    2 Posts Achievement20 Posts Achievement!5 Threads Achievement!50 Posts Achievement!365 Days+ Registered Achievement!
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Essex Junction, VT
    Posts
    1,575
    Points
    13,745
    Level
    80
    Thanks
    543
    Thanked 975x 711 Posts

    Default Re: Observing Report for 02 June 2019 - galaxies and more through the muck

    Wow, that's quite a haul, Alan! Especially with non-ideal conditions! I see you started with some NGC 4XXX's. I guess that's the difference in latitude. Because of the lateness when darkness creeps in here, I've been starting with stuff a fair amount more easterly (e.g., NGC 56XX). In any case, thanks for taking us along for the ride!
    KT4HX likes this.

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    : Meade 4504 4.5" newtonian without motors; Meade
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    12" with broken electronics and with home-made (as in 2x4s) tripod.
    EPs: Nothing fancy, mostly Plossls: 32mm, 25mm, 12.3mm, and 7.5mm. 2x
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    .

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to Mark Moyer For This Useful Post:

    KT4HX (06-06-2019)

  7. #4
    John Baars's Avatar
    John Baars is offline Bronze Supporter
    Points: 18,776, Level: 94
    Level completed: 69%, Points required for next Level: 124
    Overall activity: 39.0%
    Achievements:
    20 Posts Achievement!2 Posts AchievementGallery Achievement!Album Achievement!5 Threads Achievement!
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Schiedam, Netherlands
    Posts
    1,409
    Points
    18,776
    Level
    94
    Thanks
    1,404
    Thanked 1,239x 722 Posts
    Blog Entries
    7

    Default Re: Observing Report for 02 June 2019 - galaxies and more through the muck

    Impressive list of excellent observations!
    Thanks for your report!
    KT4HX likes this.
    Telescopes in Schiedam : SW 150 F/5 Achromat, SW Evostar 120ED F/7.5, Vixen 102ED F/9, OMC140 maksutov F/14.3, SW 102MAK F/13 on Vixen GPDX.
    Binoculars: AusJena 10X50 Jenoptem, Swarovski Habicht 7X42, Celestron Skymaster 15X70, Swift Observation 20X80.
    Astronomical Rijswijk observatory telescopes: Astro-Physics Starfire 130 f/8 on NEQ6, 6 inch Newton on GP, C8 on NEQ6, Meade 14 inch SCT on EQ8, Lunt.
    Amateur since 1970.

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to John Baars For This Useful Post:

    KT4HX (06-06-2019)

  9. #5
    KT4HX's Avatar
    KT4HX is offline HYPER GIANT
    Points: 104,702, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 16.0%
    Achievements:
    365 Days+ Registered Achievement!First 1000 Experience Points750 Days+ Registered Achievement!1000 Days+ Registered Achievement!200+ Posts Achievement!
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    11,786
    Points
    104,702
    Level
    100
    Thanks
    1,443
    Thanked 8,098x 4,361 Posts
    Blog Entries
    200

    Default Re: Observing Report for 02 June 2019 - galaxies and more through the muck

    Quote Originally Posted by combat48 View Post
    Another nice selection of "opportunities", Alan! Don and I spent a few hours on 3 Jun taking in some of your Libra objects (NGC 5793, NGC 5863, NGC 5897, NGC 5745, NGC 5741, NGC 5595, NGC 5597, NGC 5728, IC 1077) with the 30 inch Obsession. We plan to use this latest list next good opportunity.

    Dave
    Thank you Dave. I am honored that you and Don would use my report as fodder for the 30 inch. I am positive I would be in awe of the same galaxies seen with 12 more inches of aperture put on them!

    Quote Originally Posted by Mark Moyer View Post
    Wow, that's quite a haul, Alan! Especially with non-ideal conditions! I see you started with some NGC 4XXX's. I guess that's the difference in latitude. Because of the lateness when darkness creeps in here, I've been starting with stuff a fair amount more easterly (e.g., NGC 56XX). In any case, thanks for taking us along for the ride!
    Thank you Mark. Yeah, starting in Corvus with the later astro-dark times now doesn't leave a lot of time. If one has a totally clean southwestern horizon then its possible to spend more time there, but in my case I would have to reposition my set up to get an advantage. But doing that leaves me more open to the impact of passing cars on the road passing the house. I need to revisit Corvus and Crater earlier in the spring next year when they are both at their highest and in a better position from my normal observing spot next to the garage.
    Mark Moyer and combat48 like this.
    Alan || My DSO Blog:
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Astro Sky 17.5 f/4.5 Dob || Apertura AD12 f/5 Dob || Zhumell Z10 f/4.9 Dob
    ES AR127 f/6.5 and ES ED80 f/6 on Twilight-II Mount
    ES 82 24mm, 18mm; Pentax XW 10mm, 7mm, 5mm
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Astronomers: We look into the past to see our future.

  10. #6
    KT4HX's Avatar
    KT4HX is offline HYPER GIANT
    Points: 104,702, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 16.0%
    Achievements:
    365 Days+ Registered Achievement!First 1000 Experience Points750 Days+ Registered Achievement!1000 Days+ Registered Achievement!200+ Posts Achievement!
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    11,786
    Points
    104,702
    Level
    100
    Thanks
    1,443
    Thanked 8,098x 4,361 Posts
    Blog Entries
    200

    Default Re: Observing Report for 02 June 2019 - galaxies and more through the muck

    Quote Originally Posted by John Baars View Post
    Impressive list of excellent observations!
    Thanks for your report!
    Thank you John.
    Alan || My DSO Blog:
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Astro Sky 17.5 f/4.5 Dob || Apertura AD12 f/5 Dob || Zhumell Z10 f/4.9 Dob
    ES AR127 f/6.5 and ES ED80 f/6 on Twilight-II Mount
    ES 82 24mm, 18mm; Pentax XW 10mm, 7mm, 5mm
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Astronomers: We look into the past to see our future.

  11. #7
    combat48's Avatar
    combat48 is offline HYPER GIANT
    Points: 42,806, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 99.8%
    Achievements:
    2 Posts Achievement20 Posts Achievement!Gallery Achievement!Album Achievement!50 Posts Achievement!
    Awards:
    3rd Most Active Award
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Culpeper, VA, USA
    Posts
    6,482
    Points
    42,806
    Level
    100
    Thanks
    2,981
    Thanked 2,710x 1,910 Posts

    Default Re: Observing Report for 02 June 2019 - galaxies and more through the muck

    Quote Originally Posted by KT4HX View Post
    Thank you Dave. I am honored that you and Don would use my report as fodder for the 30 inch. I am positive I would be in awe of the same galaxies seen with 12 more inches of aperture put on them!
    Hoping at some point you will be able to check out the 30 inch. Given Don's vision impairment and my untrained DSO eyes, would be great to have your take on some of the objects you routinely observe!

    Dave
    KT4HX likes this.
    Unitron Refractors (60mm, 75mm, 102mm, and 125mm); Stellarvue SV110ED; Brandon 94; Zeiss Telementor T-1

    "Look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better." Albert Einstein

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to combat48 For This Useful Post:

    KT4HX (06-07-2019)

  13. #8
    KT4HX's Avatar
    KT4HX is offline HYPER GIANT
    Points: 104,702, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 16.0%
    Achievements:
    365 Days+ Registered Achievement!First 1000 Experience Points750 Days+ Registered Achievement!1000 Days+ Registered Achievement!200+ Posts Achievement!
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    11,786
    Points
    104,702
    Level
    100
    Thanks
    1,443
    Thanked 8,098x 4,361 Posts
    Blog Entries
    200

    Default Re: Observing Report for 02 June 2019 - galaxies and more through the muck

    Quote Originally Posted by combat48 View Post
    Hoping at some point you will be able to check out the 30 inch. Given Don's vision impairment and my untrained DSO eyes, would be great to have your take on some of the objects you routinely observe!

    Dave
    Thanks Dave, it would be my pleasure to do so with you guys. Hopefully in the not too distant future.
    combat48 likes this.
    Alan || My DSO Blog:
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Astro Sky 17.5 f/4.5 Dob || Apertura AD12 f/5 Dob || Zhumell Z10 f/4.9 Dob
    ES AR127 f/6.5 and ES ED80 f/6 on Twilight-II Mount
    ES 82 24mm, 18mm; Pentax XW 10mm, 7mm, 5mm
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Astronomers: We look into the past to see our future.

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. Observing Report for 25 May 2019 - playing fog yo-yo
    By KT4HX in forum Astronomy Reports Forum
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 05-31-2019, 10:45 PM
  2. Replies: 12
    Last Post: 05-28-2019, 09:01 PM
  3. Observing Report for 27 March 2019 - galaxies galore (Part 1 of 2)
    By KT4HX in forum Astronomy Reports Forum
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 04-03-2019, 10:25 PM
  4. Observing Report for 27 March 2019 - galaxies galore (Part 2 of 2)
    By KT4HX in forum Astronomy Reports Forum
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 04-03-2019, 01:52 PM
  5. Prowler 75's Observing report - 2/2/2019
    By Prowler75 in forum Astronomy Reports Forum
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 02-08-2019, 11:15 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Powered by vBulletin Version 4.2.0
Powered by vBulletin
All times are GMT. The time now is 01:57 AM.