Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 24
Like Tree44Likes

Thread: Observing Report for 07 July 2018 - dark site trip, night 1

  1. #1
    KT4HX's Avatar
    KT4HX is offline HYPER GIANT
    Points: 90,380, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 45.0%
    Achievements:
    365 Days+ Registered Achievement!First 1000 Experience Points750 Days+ Registered Achievement!1000 Days+ Registered Achievement!200+ Posts Achievement!
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    10,997
    Points
    90,380
    Level
    100
    Thanks
    1,019
    Thanked 7,365x 4,104 Posts
    Blog Entries
    197
    Downloads
    2
    Uploads
    0

    Default Observing Report for 07 July 2018 - dark site trip, night 1



    Mary and I headed over to the dark site house for a four day/three night trip to follow-up and expand on some work around the place. As a side benefit, we chose these specific dates to coincide with a forecasted stretch of excellent observing conditions and cooler weather.

    This first night the summer Milky Way was ablaze across the sky from horizon to horizon. A quick check at the zenith with the SQM-L garnered a reading of 21.5 mag/arcsec2, so I was quite satisfied. With my Interstellarum and Uranometria on the table I swung the scope to Ursa Minor to begin my foraging. The 17.5 inch and group of ES 82° eyepieces were at the ready to show me the universe. So without further ado, we will begin our evening’s journey through the night sky.


    NGC 5832 (Ursa Minor, barred spiral galaxy, mag=12.1, size=3.7’x2.2’, SBr=14.2 mag/arcmin2):

    Using 110x (18mm) and 141x (14mm) this was a somewhat bright and somewhat large off-round to oval glow. There was central brightness present. Overall it seemed homogenous, though at times, I got a sense of uneven illumination.


    NGC 5819 (Ursa Minor, barred spiral galaxy, mag=13.5, size=0.9’x0.9’, SBr=13.2 mag/ arcmin2):

    Also known as NGC 5808 due to an independent discovery by Heinrich d'Arrest and subsequent inclusion in the NGC. I found it a slightly bright and small out of round pip of light. With increasing magnification a fleeting stellar core popped in and out. It was situated between two dim field stars. Observed with 110x to 226x.


    NGC 5607 (Ursa Minor, barred spiral galaxy, mag=13.4, size=0.9’x0.8’, SBr=12.8 mag/arcmin2):

    Here is another case of additional identifies. This barred spiral is also listed as NGC 5620 owing to a duplicate observation by its discoverer William Herschel being included in the NGC. To further compound the confusion, it was later “rediscovered” by Lewis Swift and Dreyer added it into the Index Catalogue as IC 1005. As for myself, I only saw one object here. I found it somewhat bright and rounded at 110x to 180x. Small in size it contained a very strong stellar core.


    NGC 5909 (Ursa Minor, spiral galaxy, mag=13.7, size=1.1’x0.5’, SBr=12.9 mag/arcmin2):

    This spiral presented as a little bright, small oval of fuzzy light at 110x. With 141x, a stellar core was evident but no other details were visible.


    NGC 5912 (Ursa Minor, elliptical galaxy, mag=13.7, size=1.6’x0.7’, SBr=13.3 mag/arcmin2):

    This little pip of light at the eastern edge of NGC 5909 was not separated from NGC 5909 until I hit 296x. Its light mostly blended into NGC 5909 and did not stand out well.


    MCG +13-11-12 (Ursa Minor, barred spiral galaxy, mag=15.5B, size=0.6’x0.4’, SBr=13.8 mag/arcmin2):

    This galaxy appeared in the same field of view as NGC 5909 and 5912. The above listed magnitude is photographic (all I could find) and it certainly was brighter than that, being reasonably similar to NGC 5909 in brightness. Visually it exhibited a small round homogenous glow that was a little bright to the eye, lying about 4’ south of the other two galaxies. Observed with 110x to 226x.


    UGC 9748 (Ursa Minor, barred spiral galaxy, mag=13.8, size=1.4’x1.0’, SBr=14.0 mag/arcmin2):

    Easily seen at 110x as a small oval sporting a dim stellar core embedded within its homogenous halo. South of UGC 9750, and definitely the brightest of the pair. With increasing magnification (141x and 180x) it stood out noticeably.


    UGC 9750 (Ursa Minor, barred spiral galaxy, mag=14.4, size=1.5’x0.4’, SBr=13.7 mag/arcmin2):

    Just a few minutes north of UGC 9748 I suspected this barred spiral as a small oval of light at 110x. As I increased magnification to 141x and 180x it became easier to discern in the field, though it was clearly out classed by its partner sharing the field of view.


    NGC 5836 (Ursa Minor, barred spiral, mag=13.9, size=1.2’x1.0’, SBr=13.9 mag/arcmin2):

    At 110x this barred spiral was a very small oval butted up against a dim field star. Using 141x up to 297x, it was better separated from the star. Though easier to pick up with the added wiggle room, it remained a tiny homogenous oval.


    NGC 6048 (Ursa Minor, elliptical galaxy, mag=12.3, size=2.2’x1.7’, SBr=13.7 mag/arcmin2):

    Swept up at 110x, it was a somewhat bright oval that was a slightly large in visual size. It also exhibited a stellar core with averted vision. I noted it was sitting along one side of a triangle of three dim field stars, which gave it an interesting visual presentation. Observed with 110x to 180x.


    IC 1154 (Draco, elliptical galaxy, mag=13.3, size=1.0’x0.8’, SBr=13.1 mag/arcmin2):

    Though small in appearance at 110x, it was nonetheless easily spotted. It sported a bright central area within its tiny round halo. At 226x its core took on a star-like appearance.


    IC 1146 (Draco, spiral galaxy, mag=13.8, size=0.9’x0.7’, SBr=13.3 mag/arcmin2):

    Somewhat bright at 110x, it was rather small visually. Initially it was a homogenous round puff of smoke. However, when viewed at 141x and 180x, averted vision picked up an intermittent stellar core. This galaxy lies north of UGC 10053.


    MCG 12-15-18 (Draco, spiral galaxy, mag=15.0, size=0.7’x0.5’

    This galaxy is one half of Arp 109, and is interacting with MCG 12-15-17, which was unseen. Visually I found it small and dim at 110x. I noted it was slightly oval in shape with even illumination. The core became stellar in appearance at 141x and 180x. Though listed at 15.0 mag, I suspect it might be slightly brighter than that.


    NGC 6079 (Ursa Minor, elliptical galaxy, mag=12.7, size=1.4’x1.0’, SBr=13.1 mag/arcmin2):

    Viewing at 110x to 180 I found this elliptical to be a small yet somewhat bright oval. It also exhibited a stellar core, particularly with use of averted vision.


    IC 1215 (Draco, barred spiral galaxy, mag=13.2, size=1.1’x0.7’, SBr=12.8 mag/arcmin2):

    Appeared as a dim and small homogenous oval of light at 110x. The core became stellar with averted vision at 141x, and was held with direct vision at 180x and higher. It was the northernmost of line of three galaxies flowing from NNW to SSE.


    IC 1216 (Draco, spiral galaxy, mag=14.1, size=1.0’x0.9’, SBr=13.8 mag/arcmin2):

    The middle galaxy of the line of three, a stellar core was easily seen at 110x. Overall it presented a small and pretty dim oval of gray smoke.


    IC 1218 (Draco, spiral galaxy, mag=13.6, size=1.0’x0.3’, SBr=12.3 mag/arcmin2):

    The third in the string was separated a bit from the first two, lying about 9.5’ SSE of IC 1216. Visually it was noticeably elongated and thinner than its two FOV buddies. Small and dim in appearance, its stellar core didn’t reveal itself until I hit 180x.


    NGC 6232 (Draco, barred spiral galaxy, mag=13.8, size=0.5’x0.3’, SBr=11.6 mag/arcmin2):

    This rounded puff of light was somewhat bright visually. Its diminutive size yielded higher surface brightness which gave it some visual punch. I noted a very dim (15th mag) involved near the northwestern edge of the galaxy. Otherwise it was homogenous in appearance.


    NGC 6236 (Draco, barred spiral galaxy, mag=11.9, size=2.9’x1.7’, SBr=13.5 mag/arcmin2):

    This barred spiral shared the FOV with NGC 6232 about 11’ to its northeast. It presented as a somewhat large and somewhat bright oval at 110x. However, its appearance was homogenous, like a ghostly apparition floating in the field.


    NGC 6248 (Draco, barred spiral galaxy, mag=13.1, size=3.2’x1.2’x SBr=14.4 mag/arcmin2):

    At 110x and up this galaxy had a similar ghostly quality to that of NGC 6236. It was a little large in angular size and homogenous in appearance, yielding a low surface brightness.


    NGC 6288 (Draco, elliptical galaxy, mag=14.5, size=0.8’x0.4’, SBr=14.5 mag/arcmin2):

    This was a dim one. A very small oval, it nonetheless sported a stellar core as magnification was increased from 110x. It lies about 4’ southwest of NGC 6289 in the same FOV.


    NGC 6289 (Draco, elliptical galaxy, mag=14.5, size=0.8’x0.6’, SBr=14.6 mag/arcmin2):

    This galaxy was found nearly 4’ northeast of NGC 6288, and similarly was tiny and dim. Like its nearby friend, it also contained a stellar core as magnification was increased from the initial 110x. In the field, readily apparent, but basically non-descript.


    NGC 6303 (Draco, elliptical galaxy, mag=13.7, size=1.3’x0.8’, SBr=13.8 mag/arcmin2):

    At 110x I found this elliptical to be a dim and small pip of light with an intermittent stellar core pinned to its center. As I increased magnification it became more apparent and the stellar core settled down into a steadier presence, but was lacking in other detail.


    NGC 5939 (Ursa Minor, spiral galaxy, mag=13.0, size=0.9’x0.5’, SBr=11.9 mag/arcmin2):

    Seen initially at 110x, it presented a small but somewhat bright puff of rounded light. In its center was a brighter but non-stellar core. Using 141x and 180x it increased in visual presence with a broadly brighter core area.


    IC 1129 (Ursa Minor, spiral galaxy, mag=13.1, size=1.0’x0.9’, SBr=12.9 mag/arcmin2):

    First seen at 110x, it was small and rounded in appearance, as well as slightly bright. Using 141x to 226x it remained a homogenous and slightly out of round homogenous ghost. A dim 14th mag field star lay just off its southern edge.


    UGC 9896 (Ursa Minor, spiral galaxy, mag=13.5, size=1.3’x1.2’, SBr=13.7 mag/arcmin2):

    This small round orb of light was dim and homogenous at 110x. Viewed at 141x and 180x it remained evenly illuminated with no hint of internal brightening. As magnification was increased it was easier to observe in the field.


    NGC 6324 (Ursa Minor, spiral galaxy, mag=12.8, size=0.9’x0.5’, SBr=11.9 mag/arcmin2):

    Presenting as a small homogenous oval, it was a little bright visually at 110x. Using 141x it displayed a small uptick in central brightness, while 180x revealed an intermittent stellar core.


    NGC 6412 (Draco, spiral galaxy, mag=11.8, size=2.5’x2.2’, SBr=13.4 mag/arcmin2):

    Also know as Arp 38, from Dr. Halton Arp’s Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies, I found it somewhat large and somewhat bright at 110x. It appeared homogenous, even at 141x. But at 180x a very subtle broad brightness was detected in its core area. A dim 14th mag field star was noted off its southern edge.


    HD 142123 Group (Ursa Minor, asterism, brightest star=8.0, size=55.0'x28.0':

    In preparation for my next galaxy I aimed the scope at mag 4.3 Zeta UMi. In the IDSA I noticed an asterism south of the star that I had hand plotted based on the DSH asterism list. In the 8x10 RACI on the 17.5 inch dob I counted about a dozen stars laid out in a long skinny “L” shape laying on its side. No need to study it through the primary scope as the finder scope did just fine!


    NGC 6068 (Ursa Minor, barred spiral galaxy, mag=12.8, 1.1’x0.7’, SBr=12.4 mag/arcmin2):

    Using 110x it was a bright round orb, though small in angular size. An intermittent stellar core was also evident. Viewing at 141x and 180x it was bright and strong in the FOV. The stellar core persisted in winking in and out of view within the center of the small patch of light.


    NGC 6068A (Ursa Minor, lenticular galaxy, mag=14.0, size=0.9’x0.2’, SBr=12.0 mag/arcmin2):

    This tiny pip of light is often called NGC 6068A though of course it is not listed in the NGC. Known more formally as PGC 56363, at 110x it was barely seen about 2’ WSE of NGC 6068. Observing with 141x and 180x, while more visually apparent, it remained quite small and non-descript.


    NGC 6038 (Corona Borealis, spiral galaxy, mag=13.5, size=1.1’x1.1’, SBr=13.6 mag/arcmin2):

    Moving over to Corona Borealis for a little change of pace, I picked up this small round glow. I found it slightly bright visually and of even illumination. This held at 141x, then at 180x a stellar core popped into view, though otherwise, it was homogenous.


    NGC 6131 (Corona Borealis, spiral galaxy, mag=13.3, size=1.0’x1.0’, SBr=13.2 mag/arcmin2):

    As with the previous object, I found this one a small and round pip of light. It was slightly bright in overall appearance, and as I increased magnification, it remain homogenous in appearance.


    MCG +7-34-15 (Corona Borealis, mag=13.8, size=1.0’x1.0’, SBr=13.7 mag/arcmin2):

    About 22.5’ northeast of NGC 6131 I picked up this small and somewhat dim round puff of light. At 110x it exhibited a very subtle uptick in central brightness. Then at 141x and 180x the center had a broadly brighter appearance.


    UGC 10367 (Hercules, barred spiral galaxy, mag=13.3, size=1.4’x1.2’, SBr=13.7 mag/arcmin2):

    About 41’ north of the previous galaxy, and just across into Hercules, I located this rounded barred spiral. Dim and small, it appeared evenly illuminated at 110x to 180x, with no central brightness detected.


    Messier 15 / NGC 7078 (Pegasus, globular cluster, mag=6.3, size=12.3, class=4):

    Seeing Pegasus rising I wandered over to this fine globular, which I hadn’t visited in some time. In the big dob at 110x it was simply outstanding. Fairly large, it has a unique beauty all its own. The core was very small and condensed inside of a scattered outer halo of stars. Interestingly, I noticed a string of stars curling around to the southeast from the globular. I had not noticed this before, but then again, I had not targeted it with the larger aperture. Overall it was quite an impressive view. Though I did not target the planetary Pease 1 within M15, I plan to do so at a later date as it will require great attention to detail and earlier in the session before I have tired.


    NGC 7648 (Pegasus, lenticular galaxy, mag=13.0, size=1.6’x1.0’, SBr=13.4 mag/arcmin2):

    I found this to be a small and dim elongated oval of homogenous light. Observing from 110x to 226x it did not reveal any increased central brightess.


    NGC 7454 (Pegasus, elliptical galaxy, size=11.8, 2.2’x1.6’, SBr=13.2 mag/arcmin2):

    This elliptical was small but somewhat bright visually. Oval in shape, it contained a stellar core that would pop in and out of view as I studied the object. Viewing from 110x to 226x, no other details were revealed, other than it becoming a stronger overall presence in the FOV.


    NGC 7463 (Pegasus, spiral galaxy, mag=13.2, size=2.9’x0.7’, SBr=13.8 mag/arcmin2):

    The first in a string of three galaxies flowing roughly west to east, it presented as a elongated strip of light with a stellar core tacked to its center. Its major axis extended just north of the middle galaxy of the trio. Viewed at 110x to 180x, it was a little more ghostly than the other two.


    NGC 7464 (Pegsus, elliptical galaxy, mag=13.3, size=0.8’x0.8’, SBr=12.7 mag/arcmin2):

    The middle of the trio, it was very small and a little dim visually. However, this may have been somewhat illusory due to the presence of NGC 7463 just to the north which distracted the eye. The core displayed a stellar point source appearance at 110x to 180x.


    NGC 7465 (Pegasus, barred lenticular galaxy, mag=12.6, size=1.2’x0.8’, SBr=12.4 mag/arcmin2):

    The final member of this triplet, it was also the brightest. At 110x to 180x I found it homogenous and dominant in the field. It was a slight oval and a little small overall. This was an interesting group. NGC 7463 was oriented east-west, NGC 7464 was more rounded, while NGC 7465 was oriented more north-south. So this variation in position angle gave an interesting contrast.


    NGC 7383 (Pegasus, barred lenticular galaxy, mag=13.7, size=0.8’x0.7’, SBr=12.9 mag/arcmin2):

    Here we have another trio of galaxies in a southwest to northeast flow. These were the brightest in a field that clearly included others. However, I was simply too tired to spend the time to study and identify others. So this barred lenticular appeared dim and a little out of round in shape. The core seemed to indicate a slightly elevated brightness, but it was not strongly so. Observed with 110x to 226x.


    NGC 7385 (Pegasus, elliptical galaxy, mag=12.0, size=1.5’x1.3’, SBr=12.8 mag/arcmin2):

    The middle of the string of three was a diffuse oval that was noticeably brighter than the previous object. It contained a strong core set within a small, dim halo.


    NGC 7386 (Pegasus, elliptical galaxy, mag=12.3, size=1.8’x1.1’, SBr=12.8 mag/arcmin2):

    The final object of the outing was a small and somewhat bright visually. There was a pretty small, but noticeably bright non-stellar core region within a dimmer halo. Overall, I found it diffuse, similarly to NGC 7385.


    And that was it. I simply ran out of steam, which is made obvious because I just didn’t have the energy to sit on this last group of galaxies to sort out the others that were apparent within the field. This would require some work and I wasn’t mentally up to the task. Sometimes you just know when it’s time to quit!

    Anyway thanks for coming along on the first night of our stay. I will see you out there again tomorrow night (08 July), under a clear, dark country sky, where the summer Milky Way dominates and the glow of the stars far outclasses the artificial sky glow.
    Alan || My DSO Blog:
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Astro Sky 17.5 f/4.5 Dob || Apertura AD12 f/5 Dob || Zhumell Z10 f/4.9 Dob
    ES AR127 f/6.5 and ES ED80 f/6 on Twilight-II Mount
    ES 82° 24mm thru 4.7mm
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Astronomers: We look into the past to see our future.

  2. The Following 13 Users Say Thank You to KT4HX For This Useful Post:

    + Show/Hide list of the thanked

    AbbN (07-11-2018),bladekeeper (07-11-2018),combat48 (07-11-2018),Don Quixote (07-11-2018),Gabby76 (07-11-2018),helicon64 (07-11-2018),ic_1101 (07-11-2018),j.gardavsky (07-11-2018),John Baars (07-12-2018),kanadalainen (07-11-2018),kingclinton (07-11-2018),sketrip (07-18-2018),terrynak (07-11-2018)

  3. #2
    Prowler75's Avatar
    Prowler75 is offline Gold Supporter
    Points: 16,051, Level: 87
    Level completed: 44%, Points required for next Level: 199
    Overall activity: 5.0%
    Achievements:
    2 Posts Achievement20 Posts Achievement!5 Threads Achievement!50 Posts Achievement!365 Days+ Registered Achievement!
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Greensboro, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,126
    Points
    16,051
    Level
    87
    Thanks
    802
    Thanked 1,084x 828 Posts
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: Observing Report for 07 July 2018 - dark site trip, night 1

    Wow Alan, that is one heck of a night out!
    Awesome report. I really like that fact that you used the word “bright” to describe some magnitude 13 galaxies. Must be really nice to have the big scope at your dark sky house.
    KT4HX and elemental_skies like this.
    Craig
    Telescopes: Zhumell Z12, Orion Skyquest XT8 Classic, ES FL-AR127/1200, Celestron Omni XLT AZ 102, Tasco 8v
    Mounts: EXOS2GT, Vixen Polaris and an old Meade 2080 GEM
    Eyepieces: Explore Scientific 82˚18mm, 11mm, 8.8mm, 6.7mm, 70˚ 25mm, Kokusai Kohki 9mm HD-OR, Orion Plossl 25mm, Agena EWA 9mm, Zhumell 30mm


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to Prowler75 For This Useful Post:

    KT4HX (07-11-2018)

  5. #3
    bladekeeper's Avatar
    bladekeeper is online now Super Moderator
    Points: 269,137, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 99.9%
    Achievements:
    2 Posts Achievement20 Posts Achievement!5 Threads Achievement!50 Posts Achievement!200+ Posts Achievement!
    Awards:
    Activity Award
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Location
    Lowell, Arkansas, USA
    Posts
    35,276
    Points
    269,137
    Level
    100
    Thanks
    26,333
    Thanked 15,930x 10,858 Posts
    Downloads
    8
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: Observing Report for 07 July 2018 - dark site trip, night 1

    Well, you certainly had a better night than I did that night. Holy cow. Did you have to wet the scope down when you were done? That thing was on fire!

    Some tough nuts in there, Alan. Excellent eye!
    KT4HX likes this.
    Bryan
    Scopes: Apertura AD12 f/5; Celestron C6-R f/8; ES AR127 f/6.4; ES AR127 f/9.4; ES AR102 f/9.8; iOptron MC90 f/13.3; Orion ST80A f/5; Celestron Premium 80 f/11.4; Celestron C80 f/11.4; Meade NG60 f/10
    Mounts: Celestron AVX; Bresser EXOS-2; ES Twilight I; ES Twilight II; iOptron Cube-G; AZ3/wood tripod; Vixen Polaris
    Eyepieces:
    GSO Super Plössl 40mm, 32mm, 15mm, 9mm; ES 82° Series; GSO Superview 30mm; Celestron Plössl 26mm, 20mm; ES 70° 25mm; ES Plössl 25mm; Vite Aspheric 23mm, 10mm, 4mm; Orion Expanse 20mm, 9mm; KK Ortho 18mm, 12.5mm; Bresser 70° 15mm; Coulter Optical 12.5mm; BCO 10mm; ES 62° 9mm; Zhumell Z Series 5mm
    Binoculars: Pentax PCF WP II 10×50, Bresser Corvette 10×50, Bresser Hunter 16×50 and 8×40, Garrett Gemini 12×60 LW, Gordon 10×50, Apogee 20×100
    Observing: Herschel Tallies: H1 = 400/400 H2 =323/400 H3 = 224/300; 3,181 observations of 1,808 objects; Song in my head: The Band - Up On Cripple Creek

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    Days since last observing session: 2; Sessions in last 30 days: 13; Last Night's Excuse: Clouds, clouds, and clouds..

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to bladekeeper For This Useful Post:

    KT4HX (07-11-2018)

  7. #4
    KT4HX's Avatar
    KT4HX is offline HYPER GIANT
    Points: 90,380, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 45.0%
    Achievements:
    365 Days+ Registered Achievement!First 1000 Experience Points750 Days+ Registered Achievement!1000 Days+ Registered Achievement!200+ Posts Achievement!
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    10,997
    Points
    90,380
    Level
    100
    Thanks
    1,019
    Thanked 7,365x 4,104 Posts
    Blog Entries
    197
    Downloads
    2
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: Observing Report for 07 July 2018 - dark site trip, night 1

    Quote Originally Posted by Prowler75 View Post
    Wow Alan, that is one heck of a night out!
    Awesome report. I really like that fact that you used the word “bright” to describe some magnitude 13 galaxies. Must be really nice to have the big scope at your dark sky house.
    Thanks Craig. "Bright" is all relative to what one is using and where they are using it I suppose. I can't say that I ever used that term for 13th mag galaxy with the 10 or 12 inch best I recall.

    Having that much aperture at that site is the fulfillment of a long-term desire on my part. Particularly in the eastern part of the country, such skies can be quite difficult to come by, as you well know. So we feel blessed to have the opportunity.

    Quote Originally Posted by bladekeeper View Post
    Well, you certainly had a better night than I did that night. Holy cow. Did you have to wet the scope down when you were done? That thing was on fire!

    Some tough nuts in there, Alan. Excellent eye!
    Thank you Bryan. Yeah, I noticed things were a bit tough there. I will say, that Saturday night was the best conditions I've seen at the house since we bought it. Things really seemed primo. The MW overhead later on was absolutely stunning with the faint extension into southern Lyra readily apparent as a naked eye enhancement.

    I forgot to mention in the report, but the cold front that went through the day before bringing rain really knocked down the heat and humidity. When I went in after 0200, the outside temp was around 48F. Not bad for early July! I admit, I was quite chilled after having suffered through 100F temps at home a few days earlier. Typically it is around 10 deg cooler there than at home. I guess that is what 2766 ft vs 64 ft elevation will do for you. Those numbers were taken from Google Earth for the exact position where I set my scope at the respective sites. Also, I think in that air, the scope was self-cooling!
    bladekeeper likes this.
    Alan || My DSO Blog:
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Astro Sky 17.5 f/4.5 Dob || Apertura AD12 f/5 Dob || Zhumell Z10 f/4.9 Dob
    ES AR127 f/6.5 and ES ED80 f/6 on Twilight-II Mount
    ES 82° 24mm thru 4.7mm
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Astronomers: We look into the past to see our future.

  8. #5
    AbbN's Avatar
    AbbN is offline HYPER GIANT
    Points: 33,220, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 9.0%
    Achievements:
    200+ Posts Achievement!First 1000 Experience Points365 Days+ Registered Achievement!400+ Posts Achievement100+ Threads Achievement!
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Windsor, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    3,854
    Points
    33,220
    Level
    100
    Thanks
    689
    Thanked 1,104x 884 Posts
    Downloads
    13
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: Observing Report for 07 July 2018 - dark site trip, night 1

    Wow, what a night!!! Certainly faaaaaaaaaaaaaar better than mine I had a veeeeeeeeeery brief cloud clearing, long enough to get the ST80 and get a quick view (7 or 8 minutes tops) of the coathanger cluster and that's it

    Lucky you
    Abb
    KT4HX likes this.
    Telescopes: Celestron Omni XLT 120, Explore Scientific AR102, Orion ST80 Refractors; 8" Skywatcher Dob; Orion Apex 102 Mak; Coronado PST. EP's: ES 4.7, 6.7, 11, 18 and 30mm 82° EPs; Baader 24mm 68°; Luminos 15mm 82°; Meade 8-24mm Zoom. Other: CG4+16" Orion Pier Extension; Celestron 15x70 binos etc;

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
    Bortle 8
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

    The Bible tells us God created the Universe; Science tells us how He did it; And through my telescopes I marvel at His handiwork

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to AbbN For This Useful Post:

    KT4HX (07-11-2018)

  10. #6
    quincy's Avatar
    quincy is online now HYPER GIANT
    Points: 19,606, Level: 96
    Level completed: 77%, Points required for next Level: 94
    Overall activity: 45.0%
    Achievements:
    2 Posts Achievement20 Posts Achievement!50 Posts Achievement!5 Threads Achievement!365 Days+ Registered Achievement!
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Rockfeller, Pa
    Posts
    2,801
    Points
    19,606
    Level
    96
    Thanks
    38
    Thanked 1,140x 722 Posts
    Downloads
    16
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: Observing Report for 07 July 2018 - dark site trip, night 1

    Boy, Allan! You need to go up for air some time!
    Great night. May your next one be as fruitful as this one.
    Thanks for the ride with you.
    KT4HX likes this.
    Jim


    Orion 80mm Table Top Refractor, Orion XT12g
    7x35 Bushnell & Gordon 10 x 50 Binoculars, and my aging Peepers

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to quincy For This Useful Post:

    KT4HX (07-11-2018)

  12. #7
    kingclinton's Avatar
    kingclinton is online now Super Moderator
    Points: 93,003, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 34.0%
    Achievements:
    2 Posts Achievement20 Posts Achievement!50 Posts Achievement!5 Threads Achievement!Blogger Achievement!
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Durban ,South Africa, Latitude: -29.85 Longitude: 31.0166667
    Posts
    14,695
    Points
    93,003
    Level
    100
    Thanks
    5,878
    Thanked 5,926x 4,008 Posts
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: Observing Report for 07 July 2018 - dark site trip, night 1

    Epic session Alan!

    Man I need a good session like that sooner than later, thanks for taking us along for the ride.
    KT4HX likes this.
    SCOPES:Orion XT8 classic../Skywatcher 102 synscan goto/Celestron 60AZ,skywatcher 130PDS. .
    EYEPIECES:
    4mm/9mm/10mm/15mm/20mm/25mm/2" 30mm 86deg.
    BINOCULARS:
    Garrett Gemini 11X56 LW.
    CAMERA:
    Canon 1200D(T5), Mallincam hyper colour.
    SOFTWARE:
    Star tools,Stellerium, Starry night.
    BLOG:
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

    Some people don't understand why I love astronomy so much! I cannot understand why they don't!

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.



    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to kingclinton For This Useful Post:

    KT4HX (07-11-2018)

  14. #8
    terrynak's Avatar
    terrynak is offline HYPER GIANT
    Points: 33,683, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 53.0%
    Achievements:
    365 Days+ Registered Achievement!First 1000 Experience Points50 Posts Achievement!200+ Posts Achievement!750 Days+ Registered Achievement!
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    3,132
    Points
    33,683
    Level
    100
    Thanks
    2,798
    Thanked 1,867x 1,198 Posts
    Blog Entries
    1
    Downloads
    3
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: Observing Report for 07 July 2018 - dark site trip, night 1

    Massive haul of galaxies with the massive scope at your dark sky site, Alan! Sounds wonderful.

    I was able to match the view of HD 142123 through your finder with my view from urban skies with the 4.5" Newt - I picked up about a dozen stars using 53x.

    I'll feel blessed if I can get one more clear night here in Melbourne before I return home, even if it's just observing from the city. Felt good to be using a larger aperture scope (Orion Sky Scanner) and more detailed star charts (Interstellarum) on my only observing session here (compared to what I used last year), even if it lasted only for a very short time. I'm sure it'll be exciting to have the increased light-gathering power of the Orion Astro Dazzle on your next southerly trip as well.
    KT4HX likes this.
    Terry
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Scopes: Celestron Powerseeker 114EQ, Meade Polaris 114EQ, Orion Starblast 4.5EQ, Orion Short Tube 80A, and a whole bunch of others that get very little or no usage.

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to terrynak For This Useful Post:

    KT4HX (07-11-2018)

  16. #9
    KT4HX's Avatar
    KT4HX is offline HYPER GIANT
    Points: 90,380, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 45.0%
    Achievements:
    365 Days+ Registered Achievement!First 1000 Experience Points750 Days+ Registered Achievement!1000 Days+ Registered Achievement!200+ Posts Achievement!
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    10,997
    Points
    90,380
    Level
    100
    Thanks
    1,019
    Thanked 7,365x 4,104 Posts
    Blog Entries
    197
    Downloads
    2
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: Observing Report for 07 July 2018 - dark site trip, night 1

    Quote Originally Posted by AbbN View Post
    Wow, what a night!!! Certainly faaaaaaaaaaaaaar better than mine I had a veeeeeeeeeery brief cloud clearing, long enough to get the ST80 and get a quick view (7 or 8 minutes tops) of the coathanger cluster and that's it

    Lucky you
    Abb
    Thank you Abb. Sorry you couldn't squeeze more time out of an unforgiving sky. Our evening was indeed a fantastic sky show, one of those where everything just seemed to click.

    Quote Originally Posted by quincy View Post
    Boy, Allan! You need to go up for air some time!
    Great night. May your next one be as fruitful as this one.
    Thanks for the ride with you.
    Thanks Jim. I don't know about air, but I definitely needed sleep. It had been a long day and while wonderfully rewarding, galaxy hunting is also exhausting.

    Quote Originally Posted by kingclinton View Post
    Epic session Alan!

    Man I need a good session like that sooner than later, thanks for taking us along for the ride.
    I think we all need one of those periodically to remind us of why we decided to do this. Thanks for reading along Clinton, and I hope things clear up for you soon.

    Quote Originally Posted by terrynak View Post
    Massive haul of galaxies with the massive scope at your dark sky site, Alan! Sounds wonderful.

    I was able to match the view of HD 142123 through your finder with my view from urban skies with the 4.5" Newt - I picked up about a dozen stars using 53x.

    I'll feel blessed if I can get one more clear night here in Melbourne before I return home, even if it's just observing from the city. Felt good to be using a larger aperture scope (Orion Sky Scanner) and more detailed star charts (Interstellarum) on my only observing session here (compared to what I used last year), even if it lasted only for a very short time. I'm sure it'll be exciting to have the increased light-gathering power of the Orion Astro Dazzle on your next southerly trip as well.
    Thank you Terry. That just goes to show you the depth of what one can see in a smaller aperture in dark country versus urban skies. I could significantly exceed the plot of Stellarium (9.5) and Uranometria (9.75) in the RACI. I know from past experience that I can easily see many of the brighter DSOs in the finder. I recall one trip (same area, different site), where I picked up NGC 2359 (Thor's Helmet) as a very dim, very small diffuse patch in the RACI. Now that was a pleasant surprise!

    I don't know if I will be "dazzled", but I expect it will help versus the 80mm!
    terrynak likes this.
    Alan || My DSO Blog:
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Astro Sky 17.5 f/4.5 Dob || Apertura AD12 f/5 Dob || Zhumell Z10 f/4.9 Dob
    ES AR127 f/6.5 and ES ED80 f/6 on Twilight-II Mount
    ES 82° 24mm thru 4.7mm
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Astronomers: We look into the past to see our future.

  17. #10
    terrynak's Avatar
    terrynak is offline HYPER GIANT
    Points: 33,683, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 53.0%
    Achievements:
    365 Days+ Registered Achievement!First 1000 Experience Points50 Posts Achievement!200+ Posts Achievement!750 Days+ Registered Achievement!
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    3,132
    Points
    33,683
    Level
    100
    Thanks
    2,798
    Thanked 1,867x 1,198 Posts
    Blog Entries
    1
    Downloads
    3
    Uploads
    0

    Default Re: Observing Report for 07 July 2018 - dark site trip, night 1

    Skies expected to be clear on my final night in town (Friday) before I return home - hoping that this forecast holds up...
    KT4HX and Peter802 like this.
    Terry
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Scopes: Celestron Powerseeker 114EQ, Meade Polaris 114EQ, Orion Starblast 4.5EQ, Orion Short Tube 80A, and a whole bunch of others that get very little or no usage.

  18. The Following User Says Thank You to terrynak For This Useful Post:

    KT4HX (07-11-2018)

 

 
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 28
    Last Post: 07-06-2018, 11:17 PM
  2. Replies: 30
    Last Post: 01-30-2018, 08:15 PM
  3. First Dark Site Trip
    By Dennis001 in forum Astronomy Beginners Forum
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 07-12-2014, 11:02 AM
  4. Report - First trip to dark site
    By Skyscanner in forum Astronomy Reports Forum
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 05-16-2014, 07:15 PM
  5. No moon + Clear Skies + Dark Site = Great night for observing
    By tankcdrtim in forum Astrophotography Forum
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 04-25-2014, 03:37 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.0
Powered by vBulletin®
All times are GMT. The time now is 11:25 AM.