Results 1 to 9 of 9
Like Tree11Likes
  • 1 Post By cyaroc
  • 6 Post By Ozman13
  • 1 Post By refractordude
  • 1 Post By burris
  • 1 Post By jaetea
  • 1 Post By burris

Thread: Help!

  1. #1
    cyaroc's Avatar
    cyaroc is offline White Dwarf
    Points: 50, Level: 1
    Level completed: 50%, Points required for next Level: 50
    Overall activity: 2.0%
    Achievements:
    2 Posts Achievement
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    2
    Points
    50
    Level
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0x 0 Posts

    Default Help!



    Hello everyone,

    I am new to astronomy and I recently got a Astronomical Telescope with a 114mm Aperture (attached below are the specs of the telescope).


    I was wondering if anyone could guide me through what kinds of astronomical bodies I would be able to find when looking through this telescope and how I would be able to find them!

    So far after setting up my telescope, I was able to clearly see the moon in HD which made me Eureka! I am super psyched about finding and viewing other astronomical bodies

    Thank you for taking your time to help me!
    burris likes this.

  2. #2
    Ozman13's Avatar
    Ozman13 is offline HYPER GIANT
    Points: 28,543, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 99.6%
    Achievements:
    2 Posts Achievement5 Threads Achievement!20 Posts Achievement!365 Days+ Registered Achievement!50 Posts Achievement!
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Hopkinsville Kentucky
    Posts
    8,259
    Points
    28,543
    Level
    100
    Thanks
    169
    Thanked 2,184x 1,963 Posts

    Default Re: Help!

    Welcome to the forum!!

    Didn't get the specs to the scope, but I assume it is a 114mm Newtonian reflector likely on a light weight EQ mount.

    You will be able to see many things with the scope, but do not try to over power the scope with too much magnification. Most of these instruments are designed for low power wide field observing.

    One thing that will help you in finding objects and learning to navigate the night sky (and usually overlooked!) is a decent pair of binoculars. Every astronomer NEEDS a pair of binoculars. Despite owning many, many scopes, the VAST majority of my observing is done with binoculars.

    A good book like "Turn left at Orion" is good to have.

    I highly suggest looking into a local astronomy club.

    Our most important accessory is a comfortable observing chair (very IMPORTANT!!) you will see more when comfortable.

    A good finder scope makes things much easier, and either some nice laminated star charts or an astronomy app for a mobile device, many of which are free.

    Dark skies are imperative, nothing here will substitute (especially filters!), it is definitely worth some travel time to get to dark skies.

    The best teacher though is time spent actually observing, observing is a learned skill and nothing beats experience.

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    ACF 8"SCT,
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    ,
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    120, ES 102CF Apo triplet, ES AR102, ST100, ST90, Apex 90mm Mak, ST80, ETX60,
    Oberwerk BT-82XL-ED, 25x100s, 15x70s, 8x56s, Kasai 2.3x40s, Celestron AVX, CG4, SLT, LCM, Obie HD Parallel Bino mount
    Explore Scientific 82 degree and 68 degree EPs, Baader 9mm Ortho, Meade 5000 SWA EP set, many more various EPs, Baader
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    &SkyGlow, FringeKiller, SemiApo filters, Celestron UHC, Meade 4000 Nebular Filter, Kson OIII, DGM NPB and lots of astro stuff.

  3. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Ozman13 For This Useful Post:

    burris (03-22-2019),sxinias (03-22-2019)

  4. #3
    refractordude's Avatar
    refractordude is offline Bright Giants
    Points: 4,281, Level: 44
    Level completed: 21%, Points required for next Level: 119
    Overall activity: 17.0%
    Achievements:
    2 Posts Achievement5 Threads Achievement!20 Posts Achievement!50 Posts Achievement!First 1000 Experience Points
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    389
    Points
    4,281
    Level
    44
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 74x 48 Posts

    Default Re: Help!

    Upload this https://stellarium.org/.

    Find a dark/campsite at this website https://darksitefinder.com/maps/worl...4/39.00/-98.00
    burris likes this.

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to refractordude For This Useful Post:

    burris (03-22-2019)

  6. #4
    burris's Avatar
    burris is offline SUPER GIANT
    Points: 5,491, Level: 50
    Level completed: 71%, Points required for next Level: 59
    Overall activity: 2.0%
    Achievements:
    2 Posts Achievement20 Posts Achievement!5 Threads Achievement!50 Posts Achievement!Ghost Achievement! Averaging 5+ posts a day!
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1,366
    Points
    5,491
    Level
    50
    Thanks
    321
    Thanked 216x 200 Posts

    Default Re: Help!

    Quote Originally Posted by Ozman13 View Post
    Welcome to the forum!!

    Didn't get the specs to the scope, but I assume it is a 114mm Newtonian reflector likely on a light weight EQ mount.

    You will be able to see many things with the scope, but do not try to over power the scope with too much magnification. Most of these instruments are designed for low power wide field observing.

    One thing that will help you in finding objects and learning to navigate the night sky (and usually overlooked!) is a decent pair of binoculars. Every astronomer NEEDS a pair of binoculars. Despite owning many, many scopes, the VAST majority of my observing is done with binoculars.

    A good book like "Turn left at Orion" is good to have.

    I highly suggest looking into a local astronomy club.

    Our most important accessory is a comfortable observing chair (very IMPORTANT!!) you will see more when comfortable.

    A good finder scope makes things much easier, and either some nice laminated star charts or an astronomy app for a mobile device, many of which are free.

    Dark skies are imperative, nothing here will substitute (especially filters!), it is definitely worth some travel time to get to dark skies.

    The best teacher though is time spent actually observing, observing is a learned skill and nothing beats experience.
    Ozman! What a great, to the point, Answer! That should be a sticky thread on the newbie forum! Concise! Well done! Bill
    Ozman13 likes this.
    Burris

  7. #5
    burris's Avatar
    burris is offline SUPER GIANT
    Points: 5,491, Level: 50
    Level completed: 71%, Points required for next Level: 59
    Overall activity: 2.0%
    Achievements:
    2 Posts Achievement20 Posts Achievement!5 Threads Achievement!50 Posts Achievement!Ghost Achievement! Averaging 5+ posts a day!
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1,366
    Points
    5,491
    Level
    50
    Thanks
    321
    Thanked 216x 200 Posts

    Default Re: Help!

    Welcome Cyaroc! As you can surmise, you have come to the right place! Bill
    Burris

  8. #6
    jaetea's Avatar
    jaetea is offline Maven-like Entity
    Points: 158,079, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 57.0%
    Achievements:
    365 Days+ Registered Achievement!750 Days+ Registered Achievement!2 Posts AchievementFirst 1000 Experience Points20 Posts Achievement!
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Honolulu, HI
    Posts
    7,894
    Points
    158,079
    Level
    100
    Thanks
    1,224
    Thanked 3,094x 2,408 Posts
    Blog Entries
    17

    Default Re: Help!

    Hello and welcome. Below is a reprint of a post from 2013. Cheers, JT



    Hello to all the new and lucky telescope owners,

    Please use your telescope for the very first time during the day.

    WARNING, WARNING, WARNING – NEVER POINT YOUR TELESCOPE ANYWHERE NEAR THE SUN!

    All of the following information will strive to support the above statement.

    I’m writing this post so that you and yours will have the highest possible chance of having a pleasant evening viewing our amazing night sky. To me, it is a shame when I read that someone got so frustrated trying to set up the scope in the dark that they just gave up. Or you started losing your audience (wife, kids, friends/relatives) because the setup was taking so long or nothing could be found or brought into focus. This first experience may determine whether you can’t wait to use the scope again, or it winds up on Craigslist.

    First a little background on me. I've been using a telescope (sometimes several at once) for over 50 years. I've owned more than two dozen and I've built two of them from scratch. I still purchase new pieces of equipment regularly and new scopes as often as I can afford them. To this day I test out and become acquainted with each new scope/piece of equipment during the DAY! This also applies to cameras!

    The advantages of setting up your scope during the day:


    • You can see what you are doing which includes looking at and even (heaven forbid) reading the supplied instructions.
    • You can survey the backyard (or wherever your perceived choice spot is) to find the best/most level/widest open location. Don’t forget to look for the evil street lights (if you can see them, they can see you). Also, look for a secondary site just in case your first doesn’t work out (unseen street/porch light, dog poop, and any number of things).
    • You can see how the mount fits together and how it should be set up.
    • You can see all of your tools and all the adjustment screws that you will be adjusting. Plus you’ll more easily be able to visualize “lefty Lucy, righty tighty".
    • You can see how to install the scope, AKA the Optical Tube Assembly (OTA), onto the mount.
    • You can see the holes where the mounting screws go for the finder (scope, red dot/reflex, Telrad, etc).
    • For those scopes that use a 90 diagonal, you‘ll be able to see where it goes and how to secure it into place.
    • You can see the focusing knob(s)
    • You can see where to insert the eyepiece (EP) and how to secure it into place.



    To realize the rest of the advantages, you will need to point your scope at a far way mountain/hilltop, or a cell tower, or even a tall tree. I don’t even go outside to do this (I open my sliding glass door), but realize if you try to focus through a window you will not necessarily get a “focused” image because of the window glass’ irregularities.

    WARNING, WARNING, WARNING – NEVER POINT YOUR TELESCOPE ANYWHERE NEAR THE SUN! Besides the obvious damage to your eye, you can also damage the optical surfaces in your scope. In fact, stay on the other side of the sky away from the sun!

    Note: The images in your scope will either be upside down (reflectors and simple “no diagonal used” refractors) or reversed left to right – like looking in a mirror (Refractors with the diagonal and Catadiotric telescopes [Cassegrains, Maksutovs, etc]). This is normal because it is not important whether an object is shown correctly. In space there is no up or down.

    NOW THE MOST IMPORTANT PART


    • You need to practice bringing an image into focus. Make sure you start with the highest numbered (in millimeters) eyepiece (EP) (usually a 25mm). This is your lowest power EP.
      • The first time you use the scope you won't know whether to rotate the focusing knob(s) clockwise or counter clockwise. So pick a direction and rotate the knob slowly and be patient, it may take a few minutes to find focus.


    • Now that you have the hilltop/cell tower/tall tree in focus, you can move over to your (newly installed) finder (scope, red dot/reflex, Telrad) and center it (using its adjustment system) on the object that is in your telescope’s Field of View (FOV). Once you’ve adjusted the finder -
    • You can practice removing the EP and replacing it with another one (the next lowest power) and practice bringing that EP into focus on the distant object. Most inexpensive EPs require you to refocus.
      • If your scope came with a Barlow lens, now is the time to practice using that too. The high magnification produced by the Barlow will make focusing and viewing the selected object much more difficult (but on rare occasions, worth it).
      • Higher magnification is not necessarily better. Higher magnification produces: a dimmer image, an image much more susceptible to the blurring effects caused by air currents. This is known as seeing.


    • At this point, you can include your audience to help them get acquainted with their newest family member.
    • Show them where the focus knob is; tell them what they are looking at, and then talk them through focusing the image in the EP.
    • Show them how shaky/jumpy/jiggly the view through the EP is when you bump or lean or hang onto any part of the scope or mount. Especially with the Barlow lens installed!
    • Show them where the feet of the mount are so they can become better aware of how not to kick the mount and, depending on the mount, knock it out of alignment, or worst case, knock over the whole scope. This is just as important as showing them how to focus.
    • Have a plan on what you are going to observe. I want to see the moon (if it’s up, Jupiter, also if it’s up and the Orion nebula (M42).
    • Lastly, and in my humble opinion, the best part of daytime practice: showing your audience how to use the scope, during the DAY, will build a sense of anticipation for the evening’s adventure into outer space!


    ADDENDUM: I would suggest that you start with very bright objects; the moon should always be your first choice. This is followed by the planet Jupiter it is one of the 3 brightest stars in the sky. If you do look at a bright star (Sirius, Capella, Betegeuse, for example) they will always look like a pinpoint of light (when in focus). Because of their distance no matter how much you magnify it, it will still be a pinpoint of light.
    To help with locating your first objects, I would recommend you download a free planetarium program called Stellarium. If you prefer getting your information online, I use a site called CalSky (calsky.com).

    POSTSCRIPT: There is a generally accepted belief that all telescope deliveries (and the delivery of anything relating to viewing the night sky) are accompanied by an inexorable overcast sky (sometimes for many days). So it may be best to hold off showing your audience how to use the scope until you have some assurance that that evening’s sky may be clear. This will hopefully stave off as much disappointment (whining) as possible. Of course YOU should be setting up and taking down the scope daily in order to become very comfortable with the whole procedure.

    Final words: An hour or two practicing the setup and use of your new telescope will provide a first night and then many years of trouble free and breathtaking observing.

    Follow the original thread here: All Christmas NEW Telescope Owners -- Please Read!

    May you have clear skies and many, many awesome viewing sessions,
    JT



    refractordude likes this.
    Main: C-stron CPC1100 #2
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    :
    8" f/7.5 Dob mounted Newt AP
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    :
    TPO 6" RC f/9 &
    ES 80mm f/6 APO G&G Scope: Meade 102mm f/7.8
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    Guide Scopes: 70 & 80mm fracs Mounts: C-stron AVX CGEM & GT Alt-Az, Cameras: Canon T3i 2, ASI120MC Binos: 10X502,10.5X70,15X702, 25X100 EPs: ES: 21 100, 30 82 X-Cels: 9,12,18,25 Clubs: RCA & HAS

    HOME
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.

    I never met a scope I didn't want to keep.
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    "My God, it's full of stars."
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.

  9. #7
    cyaroc's Avatar
    cyaroc is offline White Dwarf
    Points: 50, Level: 1
    Level completed: 50%, Points required for next Level: 50
    Overall activity: 2.0%
    Achievements:
    2 Posts Achievement
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    2
    Points
    50
    Level
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0x 0 Posts

    Default Re: Help!

    Oh my, thank you for replying!

    I will be getting the book and I have downloaded a few astronomy apps (do you have any highly recommended ones?)

    Just another 2 follow up questions, what specs would quantify as "decent" binoculars?
    Also, after getting the binoculars, how do I optimise using it?

    Thank you once again!

  10. #8
    Ozman13's Avatar
    Ozman13 is offline HYPER GIANT
    Points: 28,543, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 99.6%
    Achievements:
    2 Posts Achievement5 Threads Achievement!20 Posts Achievement!365 Days+ Registered Achievement!50 Posts Achievement!
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Hopkinsville Kentucky
    Posts
    8,259
    Points
    28,543
    Level
    100
    Thanks
    169
    Thanked 2,184x 1,963 Posts

    Default Re: Help!

    For astronomy binoculars I would recommend porro prisms (not roof prism), aperture of at least 50mm (although 8x42s may also be a contender), and something I could return if the collimation (merging of images) is not good. If you find a pair you're interested in, ask about them here before you buy and we will give you a fair and honest opinion about them if we can. I suggest serious consideration of some 10x50s.

    This is VERY IMPORTANT!! You will always see way more if you mount your binoculars (a MUST if they are large or have higher magnification). For hand held binoculars keep the magnification at 10x or less. A simple monopod helps a LOT, but true stabilization on a tripod (hopefully with a parallel mount as well) will allow you to fully utilize the binos. My first binocular mount consisted of a METAL tripod adapter ($3 on ebay from China) and an old wooden mop/broom handle (FREE! straight from the rubbish pile) that I still have and use today.

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    ACF 8"SCT,
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    ,
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    120, ES 102CF Apo triplet, ES AR102, ST100, ST90, Apex 90mm Mak, ST80, ETX60,
    Oberwerk BT-82XL-ED, 25x100s, 15x70s, 8x56s, Kasai 2.3x40s, Celestron AVX, CG4, SLT, LCM, Obie HD Parallel Bino mount
    Explore Scientific 82 degree and 68 degree EPs, Baader 9mm Ortho, Meade 5000 SWA EP set, many more various EPs, Baader
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    &SkyGlow, FringeKiller, SemiApo filters, Celestron UHC, Meade 4000 Nebular Filter, Kson OIII, DGM NPB and lots of astro stuff.

  11. #9
    burris's Avatar
    burris is offline SUPER GIANT
    Points: 5,491, Level: 50
    Level completed: 71%, Points required for next Level: 59
    Overall activity: 2.0%
    Achievements:
    2 Posts Achievement20 Posts Achievement!5 Threads Achievement!50 Posts Achievement!Ghost Achievement! Averaging 5+ posts a day!
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    1,366
    Points
    5,491
    Level
    50
    Thanks
    321
    Thanked 216x 200 Posts

    Default Re: Help!

    To add to Ozmans excellent advice, and to clarify, Binoculars are TWO separate telescopes. Collimation means both optical axis (light paths) are collinear (parallel). Otherwise one barrel is looking one way and the other is looking in a slightly different direction. This is a recipe for a headache! Lol! Bill
    Hillrat likes this.
    Burris

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Powered by vBulletin Version 4.2.0
Powered by vBulletin
All times are GMT. The time now is 11:53 AM.