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  1. #1
    dasangrypanda's Avatar
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    Default Next Filter for the Arsenal



    Just wanted to get some suggestions from the folks here on the forum. Only filter i have right now is a Lumicon OIII, which is great but i want some more choices.

    What are your suggestions for a filter and why? I was thinking either a variable polarizing, or H-Beta.

    Side note: This will be for use in the 12" F/4.93, 1500mm FL. And it would be great if they had it in a 2" format.
    Scopes
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  2. #2
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    Default

    the variable polarising filter is
    primarily used for lunar obs.
    what makes it cool is exactly what it's name suggests.
    you can adjust the amount of light you let through
    at different moon phases,and they're available in
    2" format aswell.
    clear skies,

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    andy

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  3. #3
    dasangrypanda's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by andyp180 View Post
    the variable polarising filter is
    primarily used for lunar obs.
    what makes it cool is exactly what it's name suggests.
    you can adjust the amount of light you let through
    at different moon phases,and they're available in
    2" format aswell.
    clear skies,
    Yeah, thats the main reason i want the variable, but i figure if i can tone down the brightness on jupiter a little bit, that'd be great too
    Scopes
    Zhumell Z12 Dob, Starblast 4.5 EQ
    EP's
    6mm Orion Ultrawide, 15mm Orion Ultrawide, Orion Shorty Plus 2x Barlow, Baader Hyperion 21mm


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  4. #4
    Talitha's Avatar
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    Default

    A Zhumell 'Moon and skyglow' filter tames the glare from planets quite well. Another filter you might want to consider is a UHC. For a decade all i used was a Lumicon O-III and was pleasantly surprised with the Zhumell UHC. It's not as aggressive which means you can see more background stars without losing much of the nebulosity. TBH, i rarely use the Lumicon now.

  5. #5
    KT4HX's Avatar
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    Default

    I agree the O-III is a very good tool to have. It makes a big difference for me in how well I can see a great number of diffuse and planetary nebulae (the Veil comes to mind immediately). I also have a UHC filter, while the results are similar to the O-III, I find the O-III works best for me most times (though I like the UHC on the Orion and Eta Carina nebulae). Anyway, I agree the variable polarizing filter is a good one to have. Sure it's for the moon, but sure comes in handy when viewing the planets too, as it can cut down on the glare allowing you to see more detail. The H-beta is something I have been debating about. It is primarily for a very narrow range of nebulae, such as the Horsehead and California. I still haven't decided about spending the money on one yet. I have tried the colored filters for planets, and I sold them off as they just didn't do anything for me personally. Many people will tell you that you don't need filters, and the majority of my observing is filterless. But I have really come to appreciate the O-III filter for what it can do!
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  6. #6
    j.gardavsky's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dasangrypanda View Post
    Just wanted to get some suggestions from the folks here on the forum. Only filter i have right now is a Lumicon OIII, which is great but i want some more choices.

    What are your suggestions for a filter and why? I was thinking either a variable polarizing, or H-Beta.

    Side note: This will be for use in the 12" F/4.93, 1500mm FL. And it would be great if they had it in a 2" format.
    Hello Dasangrypanda,

    most on the filter has been written above.

    The H-Beta filter has been nicknamed the "Horse Head Nebula Filter", that is true for sure.

    However, most of the typical "H-Beta" objects are the relatively large Sharpless nebulas, requiring wide field of view in your scope.

    On the other hand, the ionized Hydrogen clouds in most of the Messier's emission nebulas show more structural detail, if compared with the overlayed less structured ionized Oxygen clouds. This may be another pro for the H-Beta filter.

    I have 2 H-Beta filters made by Astronomik, but not using them very frequently with my binoculars, or with my 6incher refractor, besides working on some details in the bright emission nebulas (M27, M42, and others). The Lumicon filters are very popular in the U.S., in spite of some claims, regarding the long-life stability of the Lumicon multilayers technology. The core of the problem might be, most of the latest developmentrs have concentrated on the extremely narrow-band photographic filters, like the true balance set SII/H-Alpha/OIII by Astrodon, and the developers have paid less attention to H-Beta.

    Should I have a 12" Dob, I would not hesitate to purchase the high-end filters: OIII, H-Beta, and UHC. I would select them from Astrodon, Astronomik, and Baader.

    Best

    JG
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  8. #7
    KT4HX's Avatar
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    Default

    Hey JG, I've been wondering about the use for an H-alpha filter visually. Do you have any experience with that filter and what it can enhance? Hope all is well there.
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  10. #8
    j.gardavsky's Avatar
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    Default

    Hello Alan,

    I have heard that some people have seen a reddish teint in the Great Orion Nebula through large telescopes. Can't confirm it, but this would indicate a possible use of H-Alpha filters.

    I do not have the numbers at the moment at my hands, but the intensity of the H-Alpha emission line may be four to five times that of the H-Beta emission line. At some high light levels on large telescopes operated at low magnification, the threshold of the human chromatic vision of the deep sky objects may be jumped over, why not.

    Best

    JG
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  11. #9
    dasangrypanda's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KT4HX View Post
    Hey JG, I've been wondering about the use for an H-alpha filter visually. Do you have any experience with that filter and what it can enhance? Hope all is well there.
    I had been wondering that my self, also had been wondering the same with the Sulphur filters?
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  12. #10
    j.gardavsky's Avatar
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    Hello all,

    the intensity of the Sulphur lines is typically a couple of % of those H-Alpha in emission nebulas. Nevertheless, some filaments in the emission nebulas may turn out to be much brighter in SII.

    There are more emission lines around the H-Alpha line. Broadband H-Alpha filters, like 12nm, may transmit them together with the intended H-Alpha on some astrophotographs. The reason in the recent developments of the filter technology has been, to separate the H-Alpha "channel" from the SII "channel", and to code them with different pseudo-colors. That has required the development of those dirty expensive filters with the extremely narrow bands, like 3nm.

    Best

    JG
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