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  1. #1
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    Default Celestron Astromaster 130eq



    Hi everyone. I recently purchased the Celestron Astromaster 130eq telescope as my first scope along with the lense and filter kit and I'm completely new to it all but extremely excited about what I might be able to discover! first of all, one of my main interests is viewing the visible planets. Any tips on how to make the most of my equipment? I would love to be able to see some detail like the red spot of Jupiter and so far have only seen a White disk and possibly the moons although not sure about this one! I don't know what combination of lenses and filters etc would be optimal as I am still new to how they work and interact. Secondly, I would love to be able to see nebulas and galaxies if possible? Again any tips on equipment combinations? I have heard a lot about Collimating the scope but have no idea what this means! Hope you can help thank you

  2. #2
    andyp180's Avatar
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    Default

    hi and welcome to the forums.
    congrtas on the new scope btw.
    you'll get some good planetary views with that scope.
    don't expect to see colourr that you see in pictures though.
    that just won't happen.
    not sure on the light pollution situation is like where you are,
    but with notts being heavily populated,i'd say it's an issue.
    unless you live out in the quieter suburbs.
    practice is what is needed,also having dark adapted eyes
    will help you see more aswell.
    for planetary viewing,loate what you need with something like
    a 25mm ep,once centred,put a higher power ep in,one with a lower
    number,say 8-10mm.
    too much mag will wash out what you are trying to see.experience
    and practice will show you this.
    nebulas/galaxies:
    they will appear similar to a cotton wool ball in the ep with your scope.
    faint fuzzies.
    to resolve more details of these objects takes a larger sccope that will
    collect more light.
    collimation is getting the mirrors in lineso that the light train has the
    correct path to the ep.
    there are tutorials here if you look through some of the stickies.
    it sounds daunting,but it is pretty straight forward once you have
    got the knack after a time or two.
    filters:most will tell you they only ever use one;a moon filter.
    the others never get used.
    hope this helps.if you have any more questions,please ask.we're
    a friendly helpful bunch.
    clear skies,

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    Default

    The Astromaster 114/130 are both bird/jones designs that use a corrector/barlow lense in the focus tube that needs to be removed in order for proper colimation. My 114 was very closely colimated on arrival, it wasn't till multiple tip-overs that it needed collimation, so I doubt that's an issue. The biggest problem you'll find is that the starpointer is almost totally useless, I'd recommend getting a telrad or some other finderscope.

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    114mm w/Telrad
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    The Astromaster 130 is an excellent telescope. Unlike the Astromaster 114, the Astromaster 130 is a Newtonian Telescope, not a Bird Jones variant. AstroMaster 130EQ Telescope (item #31045) / AstroMaster Series Telescopes / Telescopes / Products / Celestron.com

    With your telescope you can see planets, galaxies, nebulae, and other objects in space. A good book like Backyard Astronomer's Guide or Turn Left at Orion will help you get started.
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    sparky 77 is right about the finder. they are not very good. i shall be getting a telrad for my astromaster before winter.
    other than that ,it should be a perfect telescope for your beginings.
    clear skies...

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    Download 'Stellarium' - its a free program which will put a planetarium on your computer and give you some idea of where to look.

    Most planets dont show a lot of detail but your 130 should be able to show you the equatorial clouds belts on Jupter.

    For Jupiter find the planet first - it should be to the East late in the night at the monet. Its always recognisable becaue its usually the brightest object in the sky when its around (apart from the moon of course).

    A 130 will go to a maximum magnification of about x260 but in practice you'll probably max out at about x200 on a good night with clear skies.

    Once you have located Jupiter and its always ID-able through an eyepiece by usually showing some moons which will appear as bright dots either side of the planet in a line you can work up the magnification.

    I assume you have the Celestron 'Eyeopener' EP and filter kit. So start with the 10mm and then try something like the 5mm. You can add the Barlow to the 5mm to double the magnification. The Barlow is a bit of kit which doubles the magnification of ny eyepiece.
    (Magnification is calculated as the scopes focal length - in your case 650 divided by the eyepiece focal length - for instance a 5mm eyepiece - which gives you 650/5 = 130 so you would get a magnification of x130).

    As you magnify though it gets harder to focus and magnifaction also magnifies thermal currents in the atmosphere and any other problems with the sky as well.
    The filters inthe kit are of limited use in a small telescope but from memory theres a yellow filter - try that on Jupiter which may boost the contrast a bit.

    The red spot is always going to be a tough one - it usually shows as a small greyish spot.

    The 130 should get you some good views of Saturn when its up as well with the rings and also some of the brighter deep sky objects like M13 (Giant Star Cluster' in Hercules, M31 Andromeda Galaxy and (when winter gets here) M42 The Orion Nebula.

    Hope thats some help for you.
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