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Thread: Beginners Guide to Astrophotography

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    Default Re: Beginners Guide to Astrophotography



    I just got a Canon EOS 60Da. It has color filters adapted to let more IR or Ha light through to the CMOS se˝or. I've only used it a couple of times and conditions were pretty poor, but I am very impressed with the images. High ISO and long exposure times don't create as much noise as the Nikon D2x I was using before. I plan to use the 60Da strictly for Astro-imaging and am looking forward to cold, low humidity nights of winter.
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    Default Re: Beginners Guide to Astrophotography

    I too have had problems see faint DSO thru the camera, although I can see them with an eyepiece and yes you are right, the focus changes between the two. I've only recently started using a software package called "Backyard EOS." It allows you to easily change the ISO and exposure time without touching the camera and take a snapshot of the image to adjust focus. You may want to try cranking the ISO up as high as possible for live view. Backyard EOS will display a live view and give you a statistical image size of a star as you focus. The smallest value of the image star size will indicate that the star is in focus. You can then reframe the image with the high ISO noisy image in live view and then lower the ISO to 800 and take snapshot images (by snapshot I mean images that you don't intend to save) with different exposure times (start with 1 minute and go up or down from there. Once you have an exposure with a dark gray sky, maybe not completely black, you can then back off a little on the exposure time, and take 20 identical images. These images can be aligned and stacked to improve the signal to noise ratio in a program likie deep sky stacker. Backyard EOS will also help you with taking Dark and Bias images to further reduce noise and maybe improve on you optics train. Backyard EOS is $30 at BackyardEOS - BYE with a free 30 trial version and deep sky stacker is free. You will be surprised by the amount of detail in combined image that you can't see in the sub-frames.

    That turned out to be a little longer than I expected but the basic message is to crank up the ISO, I use ISO 12800, and experiment with longer exposures-assuming you have a dark sky.

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    Default Re: Beginners Guide to Astrophotography

    thanks!
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    Default Re: Beginners Guide to Astrophotography

    I am finalizing on a Canon DSLR, EOS550D. But I also have an older generation Sony Camcorder that uses DVDs and has CCD sensor. I have a mounting to fit the standard 1.25" Eyepiece. Tried out some video shots of the Moon. Were not too bad Do you think that it will suffice as compared to a DSLR? Please advise
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    Unhappy Re: Beginners Guide to Astrophotography

    Hi...
    I have a Celestron Nexstar 130slt and I have attached a Nikon D3000 (slr) to it with a T-adapter. I found some camera settings to us in AP, but this was all I got, when I captured some stars and jupiter (look at the picture). --->
    Can someone help me please? :/Uten navn.png

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    Default Re: Beginners Guide to Astrophotography

    Hi there, am new to all of this. Got a PowerSeeker 127eq, got my daughters Nikon D40, do you think that is enough to take some nice pictures?
    Any help will be appreciated.

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    Default Re: Beginners Guide to Astrophotography

    Quote Originally Posted by sabine View Post
    Hi there, am new to all of this. Got a PowerSeeker 127eq, got my daughters Nikon D40, do you think that is enough to take some nice pictures?
    Any help will be appreciated.
    From what I have learned so far and I'm really new at this, yes, your set up will work for AP. The D40 has ISO 1600 which to me is fast enough and 6.1mpx. It also has the bulb function which allows you unlimited long exposure with a remote controller, it likely gives you 30 seconds on the long shutter mode. Don't think it has live view, but focusing has been discussed here. All you need are the T ring and T ring adaptors or the one piece adaptor I just bought for my Canon (for attaching camera to telescope). Just make sure the adaptor is for a Nikon camera. If you don't have a good tracking mount you will be limited to short exposures under 30 seconds if that. I was experimenting with my new camera mounted on a tripod last week and took shots of Orion and found my stars started to bloat after only 13 second exposures. I thought I could get in longer exposures before that happened, but it doesn't matter to me because I will be using a tracking mount and hopefully accurate polar alignment with an auto guider. But again, with your set up you can combine multiple short exposures at ISO 1600, try experimenting with various times with a short shutter delay to allow the tripod vibration to settle down unless your using the remote shutter device. The easiest targets would be the moon or bright planets using Registax to stack the images. When I use eyepiece projection I go with the continuous shooting mode and take about 10 to 20 images and process them in Registax. Registax is pretty intuitive and there are plenty of tutorials on UTube.
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    AstroTech 106 Triplet APO, Celestron 11" EdgeHD, AstroPhysics 900GTO, Canon 60Da and a bunch of other stuff.

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    Default Re: Beginners Guide to Astrophotography

    I should have my AstroMaster 130EQ-MD (Motor Drive) Telescope sometime on tuesday but i got a sony cyber shot how do i take pic with it with the telescope but i think it come with something to use my sony cybershot any ideas?

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    Default Re: Beginners Guide to Astrophotography

    perlsyntax - You can purchase a universal camera adapter to attach small cameras to shoot directly through the eyepiece.
    You can find them for $30-50 on amazon. Konus makes the one I bought. I have used it to attach a small Canon Coolpix camera to my Celestron 76mm Newtonian.

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