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    KingWookie's Avatar
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    Smile Just got my telescope this friday!



    Hey guys ive been posting on these forums for about a week asking for opinions about a telescope purchase. After reciving a lot of advice i purchased the celestron nexstar 130slt off amazon for $380 with the power cord. So it came friday and i set it up in about an hour or so. The sky was farily cloudy that night but I decided to give the sky a shot anyway because i was so excited. Looking at the moon was incredible, i could not believe the detail I was seeing with the 25mm and 9mm eye pieices.

    The next thing i tried to do was set up the sky align feature but i think i messed it up because I think my finder scope was not calabrated right. I will try this again next time i observe.

    At the end of the night i found Jupiter. Using the higher power 9mm eye piece i could barely make out the redish cloud belts and some moons. I knew atleast one was a moon but im not sure if the other 2 objects i saw were stars or moons of Jupiter.

    All in all I was very happy with my telescope and what i was able to see my first night out. I would like to have some more advice however. Jupiter was pretty small but i could see some detail. I have seen some people on here talk about something called barlows which make the magnification better i guess? What kind of acsesories could i buy to make the images better and with more detail.

    Another quick question, when i go to find deep sky objects such as galaxies and nebula what eyepeice should i use and will they be hard to find and or see?

    Thanks again guys, Ryan.
    Ryan
    Scope: Celestron NexStar 130SLT
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    Awesome! congrats on receiving the scope Ryan!!
    make sure you post some pictures!!
    Name: Gus OTAs: ED 100 PRO refractor, Orion ST80 (not the CF), 8" Dob stuck in Canada Mounts:HEQ5PRO Synscan mount, Manfrotto Tripod CAMS: Guidecam Philips SPC900 webcams (4), Canon unmodded-450D DSLR

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    Here is a great shot with descriptions by zAmb0ni from Flickr (Sharealike license):



    f/5 = prime focus
    f/12 = 2x barlow
    f/16 = 3x barlow
    f/17 = 2x barlow + diagonal
    f/22 = 3x barlow + diagonal
    f/35 = 2x + 3x barlows
    f/55 = 2x +3x barlows + diagonal

    I stumbled upon it and was very relevant. I was checking out images taken by a webcam my wife was nice enough to by me that is popular for astrophotography. Note these are stacked images (not what you see colour/detail-wise - ie the camera outputs 15 pictures a second (FPS) and over 1-2 minutes they combine 1000 shots or so to make the final detailed image - but size should be retained)

    hope it helps
    cheers
    Name: Gus OTAs: ED 100 PRO refractor, Orion ST80 (not the CF), 8" Dob stuck in Canada Mounts:HEQ5PRO Synscan mount, Manfrotto Tripod CAMS: Guidecam Philips SPC900 webcams (4), Canon unmodded-450D DSLR

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    Thats an awesome chart thank you!
    Ryan
    Scope: Celestron NexStar 130SLT
    Camera: Celestron NexImage webcam
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KingWookie View Post

    Another quick question, when i go to find deep sky objects such as galaxies and nebula what eyepeice should i use and will they be hard to find and or see?
    Congrats on the new scope. Hang in there it may take a few "setups" to get things working right. Make sure to take the time to read the instructions. Try a couple of setups during the day light so you can see what your doing, (just make sure to keep the scope from pointing at the sun!!!!)

    Keep in mind both nebula and galaxies are "faint" objects! Most can be very hard to see even with much larger scopes. Go for the brightest first. Andromedia Galaxy is a good starter (It's huge!) Start with the large size lens (higher number) as you won't be able to see all of it anyway with the small lens (lower number) It will appear as a "smudge" in the lens. (trust me that is it.) Orion nebula should be appearing later in the evening now. You can see it with your eyes so is easy to find with the scope. Again start with the higher number lens (it's much easier to find objects with this lens as it has a larger FOV (field of view)). Once you have it located then try the lower number lens (it will increase the magnification of the object). Those two will get you started. The ring nebula is also fun to find as it "jumps out at you".

    Have fun and keep us posted.
    Gordon
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    Default

    The most detailed views are those at low power, well, the clearest views I should say. Regarding seeing the moons of Jupiter, low power could take all of them in. Try the 25mm eyepiece. The 9mm would be too much magnification to see all of the moons.

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    I agree with John, a webcam takes 1000s of images and basically finds the ones that are the best and combines them. Human eyes can't do that, so under most conditions you will see a haze/blur with very high magnifications (ie doubling up barlows as the Zamboni did). Start at the lowest powers, and build up to see what is the maximum magnification that you can still see nice details with. Sometimes in good seeing you can go up very high, if the atmosphere is very clear and the air is steady. Even then, aperture (size of your telescope) also limits your magnification limits.

    cheers!
    Name: Gus OTAs: ED 100 PRO refractor, Orion ST80 (not the CF), 8" Dob stuck in Canada Mounts:HEQ5PRO Synscan mount, Manfrotto Tripod CAMS: Guidecam Philips SPC900 webcams (4), Canon unmodded-450D DSLR

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