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Thread: Getting Started

  1. #11
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    Default Re: Getting Started



    Get the GSO 32mm, 20mm plossls, and GSO barlow. The other eyepieces in this line will have terrible eye relief. With the barlow you will have a 32mm, 20mm, 16mm, and 10mm eyepieces.

    https://www.365astronomy.com/32mm-GS...-Eyepiece.html

    https://www.365astronomy.com/20mm-GS...-Eyepiece.html

    https://www.365astronomy.com/20mm-GS...-Eyepiece.html
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  3. #12
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    Default Re: Getting Started

    Quote Originally Posted by fencer View Post
    Hello, I got a telescope for my Christmas last year and got a little use out of it. However, most of my time was spent learning how to use it and getting a basic idea. I put it away during the summer months, as I'm always asleep during the dark hours of the night. Took it back out the other day to re-familiarise myself with it.

    I found Jupiter and managed to see the 4 moons. However, I'm not sure what I should expect to see and therefore whether or not I've got it right. When I found it I saw a large, round, out of focus white circle. Then when I adjusted the focus until it was sharp, I could then see a small, sharp spot of light but it was very small. I could see the four moons as tiny specs of sharp light in a line next to Jupiter. I could see no detail on the planet at all though. Maybe this is correct and what I should expect to see, or maybe I've done something wrong. I was in my back garden, so although there were no street lights nearby it wasn't completely dark.

    I have a celestron telescope ac 100/660 az inspire and had the 10mm eyepiece in.

    Any tips on what I should look for in my back garden? I had some great views of the moon already.

    Thanks for any help :-)
    When observing Jupiter, did the planet appear bright and washed-out, like this...

    https://i.imgur.com/Hvt3Bg3.jpg

    If so, a variable-polariser would allow you to dim the planet to where you could see its surface details and the subtle colours of same...

    https://www.rothervalleyoptics.co.uk...ilter-125.html

    The filter screws onto the end of an eyepiece, or you can separate the two components, and place one on the eyepiece and the other on your diagonal, and then twist the eyepiece to adjust the brightness. The filter as a whole acts as a dimmer for indoor-lighting, but for the telescope...

    https://i.imgur.com/it4lX3X.jpg

    https://i.imgur.com/nQt6cqQ.jpg

    Also, your telescope originally came with an Amici, or erect-image, diagonal. Such is fine for use during the day, but at night a star-diagonal would allow you to get the best views out of your telescope...

    https://www.rothervalleyoptics.co.uk...gonal-125.html

    You can use an erect-image diagonal at night, but when observing smaller, brighter objects, like Jupiter, you may see an illuminated streak running across the planet, like this...

    https://i.imgur.com/18Z6qU1.jpg

    A star-diagonal also has a larger port through which the light passes, and that can be an advantage as well when observing at the lower powers, and for the wider views of the sky...

    https://i.imgur.com/1ETQQTF.jpg

    If you already have a star-diagonal, then all the better.
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    "Look, son! Up there!" His son shouted back, "I see it! What is it?" The father regaled, "The galaxy!
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    Alan - Refractors: Takahashi FS-102 f/8, Meade 90mm f/10, Antares 80mm f/6, Celestron 70mm f/13, Sears 50mm f/12; Newtonians:
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  5. #13
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    Default Re: Getting Started

    Quote Originally Posted by Gabby76 View Post
    No not really, the eyepieces are not much better quality than what your telescope came with and the coloured filters are poor quality. Basically dyed glass.
    The most useful part of the kit is the case itself.

    You can order some good quality GSO Plossl eyepieces from 365astronomy there in UK.
    The best price for a quality eyepiece. https://www.365astronomy.com/GSO-Sup...ssl-Eyepieces/
    OK, thank you. It looked like a nice set. I'll start with a couple from your link and build up slowly :-)

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    Default Re: Getting Started

    Loads to think about, thanks all.

  7. #15
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    Default Re: Getting Started

    The comparison of the different types of diagonals that I posted previously wasn't tailored specifically to your telescope. I have a Celestron refractor kit that I got a while back. It came with this Amici, erect-image diagonal, and the same as your own...

    https://i.imgur.com/PUgGjBu.jpg

    But I haven't used it. Here it is compared to my Celestron star-prism diagonal there on the right...

    https://i.imgur.com/jTBcmMP.jpg

    Diagonals are only to make observing more comfortable. They do not improve the optical quality of a telescope; indeed, they can only degrade it and the observing experience overall.

    The Celestron star-prism... https://www.rothervalleyoptics.co.uk...gonal-125.html

    The Antares star-mirror that I had linked to previously uses just that, a mirror. The Celestron uses a more-durable prism; of clear, optical-quality glass. At the achromat's f/6.5 focal-ratio, you can choose either one when the time comes. The term "star" within those descriptions indicates that very thing: for the stars and the sky at night.
    "Look, son! Up there!" His son shouted back, "I see it! What is it?" The father regaled, "The galaxy!
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    ! Our origin, our destiny!" And so the boy was hooked, and for the rest of his natural life.


    Alan - Refractors: Takahashi FS-102 f/8, Meade 90mm f/10, Antares 80mm f/6, Celestron 70mm f/13, Sears 50mm f/12; Newtonians:
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    6" f/5, Meade 114mm f/8, Zhumell 100mm f/4; Mounts: "Deluxe" CG-2, EQ-2, AT Voyager I; eyepieces, barlows, and diagonals

  8. #16
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    Default Re: Getting Started

    Quote Originally Posted by fencer View Post
    OK, thank you. It looked like a nice set. I'll start with a couple from your link and build up slowly :-)
    To start I would recommend the 25mm and 9mm along with the GSO 2x barlow.
    The lower section of the barlow can be removed and then threaded directly onto the eyepiece for a 1.5x gain.
    Doing this would give you focal lengths of 25mm, 17mm (1.5x), 12.5mm (2x), 9mm, 6mm (1.5x), 4.5mm (2x) so 6 focal lengths with 2 eyepieces and the 2x barlow.
    The 4.5mm will be to powerful most nights but will work very well on the lunar surface. The Moon can take a lot of magnification.
    Starting out I would get the mirror diagonal for now. If you decide you want to move up to a better quality then is the time to look at a prism.
    Good ones are expensive and on bright objects you will not see the spike, though you will not see the spike with a lesser one when looking at DSO and such.
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  9. #17
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    Default Re: Getting Started

    Quote Originally Posted by Gabby76 View Post
    To start I would recommend the 25mm and 9mm along with the GSO 2x barlow.
    The lower section of the barlow can be removed and then threaded directly onto the eyepiece for a 1.5x gain.
    Doing this would give you focal lengths of 25mm, 17mm (1.5x), 12.5mm (2x), 9mm, 6mm (1.5x), 4.5mm (2x) so 6 focal lengths with 2 eyepieces and the 2x barlow.
    The 4.5mm will be to powerful most nights but will work very well on the lunar surface. The Moon can take a lot of magnification.
    Starting out I would get the mirror diagonal for now. If you decide you want to move up to a better quality then is the time to look at a prism.
    Good ones are expensive and on bright objects you will not see the spike, though you will not see the spike with a lesser one when looking at DSO and such.
    OK, so I got the 25mm, the 9mm and the 2x barlow. Last night was quite hazy, but the first night with some sort of clear patches. I managed to get Jupiter using the 9mm and could definitely make out some slight bands running horizontally, so massive improvement. The 9mm with the 2x barlow was very hard to focus correctly. Is that simply because it was hazy? I forgot about the advice of threading it directly onto the eyepiece to make 1.5, so I will take another look. This was in my garden, so not the darkest area, but good to try it out and I can see a definite improvement already.

    Can't wait to get out of the town on the first clear night and try it properly.

    Thanks for the tips :-)

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    Default Re: Getting Started

    The biggest problem for planetary viewing of Jupiter and Saturn at the moment is they are low to the horizon so you are looking through a massive amount of heated/ turbulent air which is going to make getting good views difficult.
    Targets above 30° will be in more stable air and of course the higher the better.
    For planetary viewers such as myself you have to live with the bad years at times

    This forum is becoming saturated with spammer bots and will soon be unusable. I would recommend to move over to www.theskysearchers.com where this conversation can be continued without loosing it in the mess.
    I am Lady Fraktor over there.
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    Refractors kick arse precisely because they don't hide behind excuses. That is, they have no obstructions to hide behind. - Jon Isaacs (CN)

 

 
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