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  1. #11
    Original Mike's Avatar
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    I understand and the concept of spatial reolution (how sharp an image is) and that the maximum magnification you can use is limited by diffraction and atmospheric turbulence. What I was surprised at (having no observing experience myself,) was how small the absolute size of the planets are at those magnifications. I expected small. I didn't expect quite that small.

    I need to start getting some experience at the eyepiece.
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  2. #12
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    Another thing to watch out for is brightness.

    Since there's a limit of (typically) 220x maximum magnification (or less, if the seeing is bad), this can (depending on the aperture of the scope) leave a planet too bright and dazzling. If that's the case, you can either use a moon filter or something similar (some people like a Neodymium or SkyWatcher LPF), or (more versatile) a variable polariser. If you want to cut down the brightness with zero expenditure, you can - as an alternative - make an aperture mask out of card too.
    Last edited by great-bear; 07-27-2010 at 03:07 PM.

  3. #13
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    Small is in the eye of the beholder. When something is 5 times further from the sun or 9 times further from the sun than the Earth----------- it's a LONG way away!
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  4. #14
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    Yes, what Joe said.

    Plus, when you are staring into the eyepiece it doesn't seem that small.

    Last night I looked at Jupiter with the Megrez 90 and the Baader Hyperion 3.5 mm EP. It was unusually good viewing and I saw plenty of detail that I had not been able to see before. I clearly saw the white stormy spot in the darker Northern Belt, I clearly saw a tiny dark moon shadow crossing the disk, and I waited and watched long enough to see one of the inner moons occulted by the planet, as the moon disappeared behind the limb. I was able to confirm all the detail using the ETX125 OTA and the Meade 8.8 UWA, which together give almost the same view as the Baader/Megrez combo.

    The size doesn't really matter that much when you are looking at an image that's that close to your eyeball. It was spectacular, and did not seem small to me at all.

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  6. #15
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    Hello,
    I am looking for a megrez 90 or a ETX 125.
    You can tell me your opinion on this telescopes?
    I am visual observer, not photo.I like observing overall,planets,double stars and Messiers objects.
    You have compared this two telescopes?
    thank you very much,
    Paco

  7. #16
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    Is this the same Arlington just south of Findlay,,

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Trinko View Post
    Here is a non scientific opinion: Most of the planets are not very interesting in a typical amateur telescope. Saturn and Jupiter are the best to look at. most of the others will just be a disc of colored light. Sometimes Mars shows the polar ice caps.
    There are limits to the magnification you can use. The size and quality of the telescope is one but freqently the viewing conditions (light polution, atmospheric disturbance) are the limit. In my area (Ohio) 150 to 200 is typical, Sometimes 250x. Don T.

  8. #17
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    I started reading this post and thought, "Hey, that sounds like a question I asked awhile back. Wait a minute...
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  9. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Original Mike View Post
    I started reading this post and thought, "Hey, that sounds like a question I asked awhile back. Wait a minute...
    As Yogi Berra once said "it's like deja-vu, all over again"!
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