Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    Ratatoskr's Avatar
    Ratatoskr is offline White Dwarf
    Points: 1,128, Level: 19
    Level completed: 28%, Points required for next Level: 72
    Overall activity: 0%
    Achievements:
    First 1000 Experience Points365 Days+ Registered Achievement!750 Days+ Registered Achievement!
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    SWEDEN
    Posts
    1
    Points
    1,128
    Level
    19
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0x 0 Posts

    Default Range $1500-2500 for Astrophotography help?



    Hi all,

    I've been planning on getting a scope for decades now. I did some Astronomy at the University and I have always gazed the sky and studied the stars and planets when there is a clear sky.

    I'm now actually making more serious plans on getting a scope. I've been saving for 5 years now and the price range I can afford is US 1500-2500. Working for Greenpeace does not leave many cents in the bank
    I'm a serious amateur photographer since the 70's and the most important for me is getting as high quality, sharp photos as possible. I'm primarily targeting objects in our Solar System, anything else is a bonus, ie DSO.
    I'm not that impressed with the photos I've seen (but have not seen that many) of the planets and the moon and my own photo of the moon often surpasses the quality I find with the telescopes. Here a photo taken plainly with my dSLR camera and lens, no crop:
    ------------
    Since I'm not allowed to post URL you will have to search Flickr for "The Moon in southern Spain" by Ratatoskr to see the photo, or check other forums where I posted this too.
    My lens setup is a 1100mm 35mm SLR equivalent one.
    I do want this quality or very close to it.

    I've checked out reviews and guides all over and I'm not getting any wiser.
    A few astro sites say that the only way to go for astrophotography is getting a refractor telescope. I then read that ACF telescopes are the best choice.

    My wishes:
    - The quality shown with my camera system.
    - Long exposure possibility.
    - primarily Solar System objects.
    - motorized, computerized (I'm guessing most in this price range have this ability)
    - portability. I do not own any car or such and need to take this with me by public transportation (for ex train and/or buss). Around max 15kg total if that is possible.

    I'm guessing that getting a fast 8" scope will never get under 25kg which I think will be too heavy to carry around, especially considering my camera equipment weighing around 12-20kg too. I don't know if a fast 6" scope will be enough.


    Any help on how to go about this is greatly appreciated.

    Ow, and could you also maybe help me with any great astro apps for Android smart phone? I do have the simple Google Sky, but it does not have much info.

  2. #2
    Joe Lalumia's Avatar
    Joe Lalumia is offline HYPER GIANT
    Points: 61,001, Level: 100
    Level completed: 0%, Points required for next Level: 0
    Overall activity: 0%
    Achievements:
    200+ Posts Achievement!Ghost Achievement! Averaging 5+ posts a day!Got three FriendsFirst 1000 Experience Points20+ Friends Achievement!
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Quinlan, Texas
    Posts
    10,947
    Points
    61,001
    Level
    100
    Thanks
    6,772
    Thanked 5,156x 3,400 Posts
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    I moved your post to the Astrophotography forum.

    My suggestion would be to buy the best Equatorial mount you can afford, a CG5 and or an Atlas EQ-G and then mount an 80mm refractor on it. Either an ED or APO refractor. This is the easiest to learn with. Later you can use the refractor as a guide scope.

    Right now you can buy an Astro Tech RC6 for $299 --- here:
    http://www.astronomics.com/main/prod...oduct_id/AT6RC

    IT'S A REAL DEAL! You will need to buy the extension rings to come to focus with your camera buy a 2 inch and a 1 inch ring. These two work with most cameras. Either mount listed above can carry this scope.


    Stay tuned others will also give you their opinions on your first rig.

    Clear skies!
    Last edited by Joe Lalumia; 01-06-2011 at 06:47 PM.
    ETX 125PE, Stellarvue 80mm BV & Televue TelePod tripod,
    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    8" LNT, 10x50, 15x70mm binoculars, Stellarvue binoviewers, solar filters for all three telescopes..... plus a bunch of ham radios... Ham radio call sign - W1XWX

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.


    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    TelescopeMan Web Site

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.
    search for W1XWX to see my amateur radio web site

    "If you can't explain it to a six year old, you don't understand it yourself.” - Albert Einstein

    To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 5 or greater. You currently have 0 signatures.

  3. #3
    PeterR's Avatar
    PeterR is offline White Dwarf
    Points: 1,700, Level: 24
    Level completed: 50%, Points required for next Level: 100
    Overall activity: 0%
    Achievements:
    First 1000 Experience Points365 Days+ Registered Achievement!750 Days+ Registered Achievement!2 Posts Achievement50 Posts Achievement!
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Sydney Australia
    Posts
    34
    Points
    1,700
    Level
    24
    Thanks
    23
    Thanked 12x 8 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ratatoskr View Post
    I'm a serious amateur photographer since the 70's and the most important for me is getting as high quality, sharp photos as possible. I'm primarily targeting objects in our Solar System, anything else is a bonus, ie DSO.
    I'm not that impressed with the photos I've seen (but have not seen that many) of the planets and the moon and my own photo of the moon often surpasses the quality I find with the telescopes. My wishes:
    - The quality shown with my camera system.
    .

    Hello!

    At the considerable risk of seriously misunderstanding your intentions or astronomical knowledge when it comes to astrophotography, let me make the following observations which you may take with a grain of salt.

    Firstly, your moon photo is really good! I googled it easily. What you may not be considering is that this was obviously a rather short exposure. When you use a telescope and magnify the object by 100x or more, many many factors come into play that do not come into play when you photograph the moon as you did.
    1. Atmospheric distortion.
    2. vibration (bad mounting or wind)
    3. bad focusing. This is VERY difficult even with the best equipment because images are dim and image sensors on cameras are SLOW to react. Until you have tried it yourself you may not appreciate my words alone!
    4. If you imagine that you can just strap on a digital still camera and capture images as sharp as your nearly full moon photo you will be surprised, possibly not in a good way, and with the planets, just forget that approach. Your personal standards will not be met.
    5. You have mentioned a budget for a scope/mount but nothing as far as equipment for imaging. This leads me to suspect that you think your current equipment will suffice. It may in some instances, but more than likely you will need a dedicated astronomical camera of some sort. Yes, many people use simple and inexpensive webcams rather effectively, but if you want to do better count on spending from several hundred to thousands on a good camera dedicated to astro imaging. Your standard (I'm guessing) digital SLR (or film?) is going to be very bulky and very difficult to use for planets. These cameras are rather heavy to hang on a simple focuser tube, though you can certainly do it. Digital SLRs with modification of the IR filter are used very effectively for DSO photography, but not so much for planets. For planets and the moon, the imaging technique of the day is to capture thousands of frames (ie video), throw away the bad frames due to vibration and atmospheric distortion, and process the remainder in programs like Registax and Photoshop.

    Your desire to capture high quality images is the goal of all of us interested in this wonderful art. It just turns out to be very difficult. The skills you obviously have are wonderful, but only partly overlap with the new skills and techniques that you will be forced to learn. I'd hate to see you use all of your precious savings on just the scope/mount only to later find out that your photo gear is not up to the task and goals you have set out for yourself.

    Feel free to post more questions, and for sure, tell us exactly what equipment you intend to use.
    Last edited by PeterR; 01-07-2011 at 09:48 AM.
    Equipment: 5" f15 Refractor on modified Cave Astrola mount, homemade drive corrector; 100ED Sky-Watcher on HEQ5 Pro. DFK31AU03.AS. TV Powermate, TV 3X Barlow.

 

 

Similar Threads

  1. HDR High Dynamic Range Astrophotography
    By admin in forum Astrophotography Forum
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 01-20-2010, 01:16 AM
  2. EARN MONEY $2500-10000 PER WEEK
    By reka in forum UK Astronomy Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-20-2008, 10:01 AM
  3. Suggestions in the 1500.-2000. range...
    By John D'Amico in forum Amateur Astronomy Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 01-13-2004, 05:46 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.0
Powered by vBulletin®
All times are GMT. The time now is 08:02 PM.