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  1. #1
    W. Watson's Avatar
    W. Watson Guest

    Default Using a Birding (Spotting) Scope for Visual Astronomy



    I'm a little tight on weight and space for a trip that I plan to combine
    some astro and birding. I've never tried my birding scope, a Vortex (Stokes,
    20-60x, 80mm <http://www.eagleoptics.com/index.asp?pid=4471>), for
    astronomy, but I will tonight. Any comments on this soft of use? I do not
    have expectations that it will be like some of the better refractors of the
    same size. I have no intention of doing photography with it, just visual
    observing.
    --
    Wayne Watson (Nevada City, CA)

    Web Page: <speckledwithStars.net>

  2. #2
    Howard Lester's Avatar
    Howard Lester Guest

    Default Using a Birding (Spotting) Scope for Visual Astronomy

    "W. Watson" wrote


    Let us know tomorrow what your own observations reveal.



  3. #3
    ThomA's Avatar
    ThomA Guest

    Default Using a Birding (Spotting) Scope for Visual Astronomy




    Dude..it's a telescope any way you cut it. The only problem will be having
    a 60 X's maximum mag. The fact you have nothing to compare to makes your
    question pointless too.



  4. #4
    benk's Avatar
    benk Guest

    Default Using a Birding (Spotting) Scope for Visual Astronomy

    On Nov 7, 10:42 am, "W. Watson" <wolf_tra...@invalid.com> wrote:

    Hi, Wayne.

    The main difficulty is that these scopes rarely have a 90 degree
    diagonal. That's why I chose the TV-60 as my birding scope; it's
    designed to do this kind of double duty. I would imagine the Vortex
    scope will show some chromatic aberration, but not too much--birders
    are pretty demanding of their optics as well.

    --Ben


  5. #5
    W. Watson's Avatar
    W. Watson Guest

    Default Using a Birding (Spotting) Scope for Visual Astronomy

    Yes, that's true, for the most part, about birders. I suspect I'll just get
    along fine with it. I have no plans to photograph with it, and I'm pretty
    sure I'll be OK with the angled eyepiece. If not, I can pop down to
    Stellarvue, which is not far from here, and check out some simple refractor.

    benk wrote:

    --
    Wayne Watson (Nevada City, CA)

    Web Page: <speckledwithStars.net>

  6. #6
    W. Watson's Avatar
    W. Watson Guest

    Default Using a Birding (Spotting) Scope for Visual Astronomy

    My first observation about the spotting scope is that it is a bit difficult
    to aim. I don't think I can strap a Telrad to it*! I just realized that I
    have an old 4" Meade SCT. It weighs 18 oz more than my spotting scope. Ah, I
    have a green laser light, and just noticed the spotting scope has something
    of a simple sight. It's about 2" long with a 2mm hole through it. Hmm,
    possibilities. The Meade is a bit more compact. 5x7x11" with the finder on it.

    Optically the spotting scope seems fine. Good focus. On the camera tripod,
    it's not positioned in the middle of the attachment. 1/3 in front of the
    attachment.

    * After examining it more closely, possibly I can.

    W. Watson wrote:

    --
    Wayne Watson (Nevada City, CA)

    Web Page: <speckledwithStars.net>

  7. #7
    W. Watson's Avatar
    W. Watson Guest

    Default Using a Birding (Spotting) Scope for Visual Astronomy

    I was mistaken about the attachment position. The attachment is about 1/2
    way. The weight is decidedly to the back. A smooth ball head would be
    helpfulin moving the scope around the sky. My tripod has az/el movement. Not
    bad though.

    W. Watson wrote:

    --
    Wayne Watson (Nevada City, CA)

    Web Page: <speckledwithStars.net>

  8. #8
    W. Watson's Avatar
    W. Watson Guest

    Default Using a Birding (Spotting) Scope for Visual Astronomy

    Well, my old (12 years) 2045 4" Meade's mirror seems loose. I probably don't
    have enough time to fix it. Maybe there's a web site that talks to that. The
    spotting scope has performed very well, but pointing is still troublesome.

    The little 2" sight has possibilities as a support for my laser light. The
    problem is though the the OTA bows a bit and the finder is angled away from
    the body of the OTA. Wedging the laser light in there makes it point
    incorrectly. Maybe I can take advantage of sight by somehow using a stiff
    wire through it and fastening the laser light to it somehow, something like
    a old fashioned toilet paper hanger.

    W. Watson wrote:

    --
    Wayne Watson (Nevada City, CA)

    Web Page: <speckledwithStars.net>

  9. #9
    W. Watson's Avatar
    W. Watson Guest

    Default Using a Birding (Spotting) Scope for Visual Astronomy

    And the winner is? The birding scope. I found a finder that
    has adhesive to glue on a red dot finder. Fortunately, there's a
    dealer nearby.

    --
    Wayne Watson (Nevada City, CA)

    Web Page: <speckledwithStars.net>

 

 

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