former senior member of Ronald Reagan's Economic Policy
* Advisory Board fears that the advancing technology may soon end with,
* "all of us tagged like so many fish." Writing in the October 11th, 1993
* Washington Times he confirmed the drift toward human applications of the
* chip:
*
* You see there is an identification system made by
* the Hughes Aircraft Company that you can't lose.
*
* It's the syringe implantable transponder.
*
* According to promotional literature it is an
* "ingenious, safe, inexpensive, foolproof and
* permanent method of identification using radio
* waves. A tiny microchip, the size of a grain of
* rice, is simply placed under the skin. It is so
* designed as to be injected simultaneously with a
* vaccination or alone."
*
*
* When government technocrats want Americans to accept the unacceptable,
* they move slowly. In the case of reaching the ultimate goal of a universal
* system of personal identification, this introduction is likely to begin
* with the smartcard, and progress to non-implantable, bio-chips attached to
* the clothing or worn in bracelets.
*
* In Europe, this system has already been used at track and field events
* where the competitors wear the device attached to their jersey. This
* provides their coordinates during each event and can be used for the
* timing of races.
*
* Widespread use among sports figures could go a long
* way toward popularizing the chip among the young.
*
* According to microchip researcher Terry Cook, U.S. military recruits are
* also being introduced to the bracelet, just as Marine recruits at Parris
* Island helped test the military's Smartcard prototype.