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  1. #1
    Daniele Gasparri's Avatar
    Daniele Gasparri Guest

    Default Detecting and studying the extrasolar planets with amateur equipment



    Hello group;
    I want to present a new field of application: the photometric study of the
    extrasolar planets with amateur equipment. Using a normal telescope and a
    good CCD camera it is possible to show the dimming of the star due to the
    transit of a giant planet in front of it. The planet I followed in the past
    days is TrEs-2 a Jupiter like in the constellation of Draco, for 2 transit
    in a row (26 and 31 July). The light curves, obtained with the differential
    photometry technique, show clearly the transit, and I think there is the
    possibility for a quantitative study of the planet.
    The results with the light curves are visible on my homepage.
    I hope this can be useful
    Clear skies

    --
    Daniele Gasparri
    Perugia (Italy)
    www.danielegasparri.com



  2. #2
    poster1234us@yahoo.com's Avatar
    poster1234us@yahoo.com Guest

    Default Detecting and studying the extrasolar planets with amateur equipment

    Daniele,

    That is a nice piece of work. So, in theory, you could use the same
    equipment to "discover" an extrasolar planet?

    Fred


  3. #3
    canopus56's Avatar
    canopus56 Guest

    Default Detecting and studying the extrasolar planets with amateur equipment

    On Aug 3, 2:42 pm, "Daniele Gasparri" <danielegasparr...@SPAMyahoo.it>
    wrote:
    <snip all>
    Nice site and images, Daniele. You are probably aware of Bruce Gary's
    similar work on detecting exoplanets. If not, a url link follows:

    http://brucegary.net/tutorial_exoplanet/x.htm

    - Canopus56


  4. #4
    Daniele Gasparri's Avatar
    Daniele Gasparri Guest

    Default Detecting and studying the extrasolar planets with amateur equipment

    <poster1234us@yahoo.com> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:1186262356.621505.286410@g4g2000hsf.googlegro ups.com...

    Thank you Fred,
    Yes, the same equipment can be used to discover new transiting planets; you
    need just a little patience and luck.
    But using this technique with newly discovered planets (for example with
    radial velocity technique) , we get many other information, so the light
    curve it's important both to discover and to study better already discovered
    planets, and, most important, almost every amateur astronomer can do that:
    you need just a CCD camera and a 20 cm telescope.


    --
    Daniele Gasparri
    Perugia (Italy)
    www.danielegasparri.com





 

 

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