Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 36
  1. #1
    Jeremiah J. Burton's Avatar
    Jeremiah J. Burton Guest

    Default The Sun, in an Open Cluster



    I read somewhere that the sun is part of an open cluster. If thats true,
    wouldn;t it have to be awefully OLD for an open cluster?

    What other stars are in the cluster? How many? How large is it? Any
    nebula still left?

    thanks

    jjb

  2. #2
    William C. Keel's Avatar
    William C. Keel Guest

    Default The Sun, in an Open Cluster

    Jeremiah J. Burton <jburton@nospamhewittenergygroup.com> wrote:


    More precisely, the Sun was almost certainly formed as part of such a
    cluster (based on virtually all young stars we see today coming in clusters
    and associations). Open clusters lose their identities over time, for
    at least two reasons. First, the more of the remaining gas is blown
    away by the most massive cluster members (including their supernovae), the
    less mass is left to hold the whole cluster together gravitationally.
    On top of that, random encounters with stars and massive interstellar
    clouds will strip stars away over time. These are reasons that there
    are very few open clusters known to nearly as old as the Sun (M67 and
    NGC 188?), and the number increases rapidly for smaller ages. By now,
    Sol has lost track of the siblings, although there are a few nearby stars
    with similar enough space motions that they might share a common
    origin.

    Bill Keel

  3. #3
    Sam Wormley's Avatar
    Sam Wormley Guest

    Default The Sun, in an Open Cluster

    "Jeremiah J. Burton" wrote:

    Several of the stars in the "big dipper" have similar motions about the
    galaxy as our sun. The age of ordinary chondrite meteorite types range
    from 4.48 ± 0.08 to 4.577 ± 0.004 billion years.

    THE AGE OF THE EARTH
    by G. Brent Dalrymple
    Stanford University Press 1991
    QE508.D28 1991 551.1--dc20 90-47051 CIP
    ISBN 0-8047-1569-6

  4. #4
    Chris L Peterson's Avatar
    Chris L Peterson Guest

    Default The Sun, in an Open Cluster

    On Thu, 20 May 2004 17:50:13 GMT, Sam Wormley <swormley1@mchsi.com> wrote:


    Sam-

    That's a really peculiar statement. What exactly is it saying? Are you
    expressing a range with a different tolerance top and bottom? Are these simply
    values given from two different sources?

    _________________________________________________

    Chris L Peterson
    Cloudbait Observatory
    http://www.cloudbait.com

  5. #5
    Sam Wormley's Avatar
    Sam Wormley Guest

    Default The Sun, in an Open Cluster

    Chris L Peterson wrote:


    Sorry--There are many "types" of ordinary chondrite meteorites.
    The type that dates the youngest is 4.48 ± 0.08 billion years.
    The type that dates the oldest is 4.577 ± 0.004 billion years.

  6. #6
    Marty's Avatar
    Marty Guest

    Default The Sun, in an Open Cluster

    Fellow Iowan Sam Wormley was saying

    Seems like I can remember reading long ago that Sirius seemed to be
    moving along with this group too.
    Marty


  7. #7
    Sam Wormley's Avatar
    Sam Wormley Guest

    Default The Sun, in an Open Cluster

    Marty wrote:


    I believe I've read that too. There is some doubt that
    any of the stars mentioned in the this thread are the remnants of
    the original cluster... mostly because the spectral types imply
    big age differences.

  8. #8
    Thomas's Avatar
    Thomas Guest

    Default The Sun, in an Open Cluster



    Your answer has NOTHING to do with the question Sammy.



  9. #9
    Chris L Peterson's Avatar
    Chris L Peterson Guest

    Default The Sun, in an Open Cluster

    On Thu, 20 May 2004 23:51:06 GMT, "Thomas" <TMA1@yahoo.ca> wrote:


    How do you figure? He identified several stars that are candidates for having
    formed in the same cluster as the Sun (inferred from similar motion) and
    provided evidence for the age of the Solar System, in reference to the age an
    existing open cluster would be. Seems pretty in line with the original question
    to me.

    _________________________________________________

    Chris L Peterson
    Cloudbait Observatory
    http://www.cloudbait.com

  10. #10
    Stuart Levy's Avatar
    Stuart Levy Guest

    Default The Sun, in an Open Cluster

    In article <40ACEFD4.8FA24B1C@mchsi.com>, Sam Wormley wrote:

    I remember reading that in, I think, T. W. Webb's Celestial Objects
    for Common Telescopes, and mentioned it here last year.
    Another poster pointed out that the Big Dipper stars must be
    much much younger than the Sun. Given that even the dimmest of the
    bright ones, Megrez, is a main-sequence A star with about 20 times
    the Sun's luminosity, it sure can't be anything approaching
    5 billion years old, so presumably the similar space velocity is only
    coincidental.

    Are there stars with ages compatible with the Sun's that have
    similar space velocities? I'm interested in this too.

    Stuart

 

 
Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Christmas Tree Cluster - Open Cluster
    By admin in forum Astrophotography Forum
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 01-23-2010, 09:35 AM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 07-20-2008, 03:27 AM
  3. M67 Open Cluster
    By Dennis Persyk in forum General Astronomy Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-01-2004, 11:06 AM
  4. NGC1647 Open cluster - Help in field testing a draft cluster magnitude chart
    By Tony Flanders in forum Amateur Astronomy Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-07-2004, 12:44 PM
  5. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-22-2004, 08:53 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.0
Powered by vBulletin®
All times are GMT. The time now is 10:53 PM.