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  1. #1
    Stephen Paul's Avatar
    Stephen Paul Guest

    Default Herald - Bobroff AstroAtlas (mini-review)



    I have to say that at both first and second glance, this Atlas lives up to
    its reputation.

    A quick rundown of what's included, copied from the Chart Summary on Pgs.
    3-5:

    There are 12 charts int he A-series. Each covers the whole sky, and
    generally shows the distribution of objects.
    A-01 Distribution of Bright Stars
    A-02 Constellations
    A-03 C-Series chart boudaries (for locating which C-series chart covers what
    area of sky)
    A-04 D-Series chart boundaries
    A-05 Distribution of the best DSOs
    A-06 Distribution of Galaxies (to mag 12)
    A-07 Distribution of Bright Nebulae
    A-08 Distribution of Globular Clusters (to mag 15)
    A-09 Distribution of Planetary Nebulae (to mag 15)
    A-10 Distribution of Open Clusters (to mag 12)
    A-11 Distribution of Dark Nebulae
    A-12 Distribution of Messier objects

    (These "Distribution" charts have the same size and grid as the C and D
    chart boundaries. So, at a glance, you can see which C and D chart covers
    the objects listed at any location for the whole sky distributions. Prett
    neat. Easy to use.)

    The B-series charts are based on the Yale Bright Star Catalogue and each one
    covers 64 degrees in declination and 6 hours in right ascension with stars
    down to mag 6.9. There are three sets of the B-Series charts that provide
    the same sky coverage, B, BS and BM. The B and BS charts are the same, only
    the BS are plotted with South at the top. These two sets are "ideal for
    locating the brighter and most spectacular astronomical objects". The third
    of the B-series is the BM, in which only stars are plotted, with each
    labeled by magnitude. This chart can be used to determine your NELM, or for
    that matter the magnitude of any naked eye star to mag 6.5 (since that is
    one of my favorite things to do in this hobby, that's way cool).

    The C-series charts are the main charts covering "the whole sky in 94 charts
    at a uniform scale". The charts plot stars to magnitude 9 and non-stellar to
    magnitude 14.

    The D-series charts are plots of 42 regions within the C-series charts where
    more area is necessary. The Virgo cluster is an example. These are divided
    up into 4 groups:
    - the polar regions
    - the Magellanic clouds
    - rich regions in the Milky Way, the region around Orion and the Pleaides
    - regions having many galaxies

    The E-series charts make up for what the D-series charts lack in handling:
    - the Large Megallanic Clouds (plotted with stars to mag 14)
    - the Virgo cluster (in 4 charts. stars to mag 13, non-stellar to mag 15)
    - the central region of the Small Megallanic Cloud (stars to mag 14,
    non-stellar to mag 15)
    - the region around eta Carinae (stars to mag 11, non-stellar to mag 15)

    All charts have some level of cross referencing going on so that at any
    time, in any chart, you can determine the neighboring chart, or where a
    "deep" chart is available where warranted.

    This is by far the best atlas I've seen for table top reference (I have
    Norton's, the BSA, and SA2000, as well as TheSky L1, and Cartes du Ciel).

    The pages are bound in spiral fashion and it might be kind of handy to break
    the complete altas up into the separate charts, if you can find some spare
    spirals around somewhere. At 11" x 16", and with the amount of coverage on
    each page, as well as the full foldback capability of the spiral binding, I
    foresee no problems whatsoever using this atlas in the field. Probably the
    most difficult thing will be seeing the embedded indicators for the D-series
    charts, which are designated in a light gray font.

    Basically, I'm thinking this means, "so long Sky Atlas 2000 Deluxe". It's
    that much better, and the size and page format beats the pants off the SA200
    Deluxe fold-out pages (which I never liked).
    -----------
    Regards,
    Stephen Paul
    Shirley, MA



  2. #2
    Geoff's Avatar
    Geoff Guest

    Default Herald - Bobroff AstroAtlas (mini-review)

    On Wed, 19 May 2004 00:02:23 -0400, "Stephen Paul"
    <spaul219@hotmail.com> wrote:


    Its just a shame that its no longer printed in Australia so its going
    to cost a bomb to ship


  3. #3
    Jax's Avatar
    Jax Guest

    Default Herald - Bobroff AstroAtlas (mini-review)


    "Geoff" <nospam@me.com> wrote in message
    news:fh8ma0trttj4pqlvgq20rk76r9an2nk6oc@4ax.com...

    Shipping from Australia to the US wasn't expensive if it went surface. As
    David suggested, it's air shipped over water anyway, so the time saved is
    surface vs air from your port of entry. Hope it works the same when
    returning to it's country of origin. Perhaps David and Peter can work a
    deal so it will be available to their fellow countrymen at a good price.

    peace,
    jon



  4. #4
    Shneor Sherman's Avatar
    Shneor Sherman Guest

    Default Herald - Bobroff AstroAtlas (mini-review)

    "Stephen Paul" <spaul219@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:<3fidnZMMp-nIQTfdRVn-sw@net1plus.com>...

    What I like most about H-B is the shape of the "C" charts - wedges of
    sky rather than projections that don't show distances that are
    consistently accurate.
    Clear skies,
    Shneor Sherman

  5. #5
    Brian Tung's Avatar
    Brian Tung Guest

    Default Herald - Bobroff AstroAtlas (mini-review)

    Shneor Sherman wrote:

    Aside from planispheres and full-sky wall maps, I don't think any star
    atlases really show that much distortion.

    BTW, Shneor, did you get my e-mail?

    Brian Tung <brian@isi.edu>
    The Astronomy Corner at http://astro.isi.edu/
    Unofficial C5+ Home Page at http://astro.isi.edu/c5plus/
    The PleiadAtlas Home Page at http://astro.isi.edu/pleiadatlas/
    My Own Personal FAQ (SAA) at http://astro.isi.edu/reference/faq.txt

  6. #6
    Tony Flanders's Avatar
    Tony Flanders Guest

    Default Herald - Bobroff AstroAtlas (mini-review)

    brian@isi.edu (Brian Tung) wrote in message news:<c8g3d7$7ha$1@zot.isi.edu>...


    Tirion's Bright Star Atlas uses a rectangular projection that distorts
    quite heavily. Doesn't really bother me, but it does limit its usefulness
    for certain purposes. Norton's has basically the same plan as the BSA,
    but tapers each gore toward the top and bottom, yielding much less
    distortion.

    Obviously, to some extent, the larger the scale, the smaller the
    distortion. That's just an inherent fact about mapping portions of
    a sphere onto a plane -- unless you go out of your way to distort
    when you don't have to.

    - Tony Flanders

  7. #7
    Shneor Sherman's Avatar
    Shneor Sherman Guest

    Default Herald - Bobroff AstroAtlas (mini-review)

    brian@isi.edu (Brian Tung) wrote in message news:<c8g3d7$7ha$1@zot.isi.edu>...

    E-mail - No, or at least, not yet. I haven't checked since yeaterday.
    Nor that I think about it, I don't remember including my e-mail
    address. I have not received it at my ISP, as it turns out. You can
    find me at the tac-sac Yahoo group, if you don't mind checking that
    out.

    How much distortion? More near the edges and corners, that's for sure.
    At the scale of the new Uranometria, not much at all. But there's none
    with H-B.

    Clear skies,
    Shneor Sherman

  8. #8
    Brian Tung's Avatar
    Brian Tung Guest

    Default Herald - Bobroff AstroAtlas (mini-review)

    Shneor Sherman wrote:

    I think it would be better if you just e-mailed me. I need your address
    in order to send you the registration file.

    Brian Tung <brian@isi.edu>
    The Astronomy Corner at http://astro.isi.edu/
    Unofficial C5+ Home Page at http://astro.isi.edu/c5plus/
    The PleiadAtlas Home Page at http://astro.isi.edu/pleiadatlas/
    My Own Personal FAQ (SAA) at http://astro.isi.edu/reference/faq.txt

  9. #9
    Alan French's Avatar
    Alan French Guest

    Default Herald - Bobroff AstroAtlas (mini-review)


    "Stephen Paul" <spaul219@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:3fidnZMMp-nIQTfdRVn-sw@net1plus.com...

    Stephen,

    Do you still need a magnifying glass and a secret decoder ring to figure out
    all the symbols?

    Clear skies, Alan


  10. #10
    Rod Mollise's Avatar
    Rod Mollise Guest

    Default Herald - Bobroff AstroAtlas (mini-review)

    >Do you still need a magnifying glass and a secret decoder ring to figure out

    Hi Alan:

    I don't know about him, but I do. ;-)

    It does get a little easier, but I keep the cheat sheet handy.

    Peace,
    Rod Mollise
    Author of _Choosing and Using a Schmidt Cassegrain Telescope_
    Like SCTs and MCTs?
    Check-out sct-user, the mailing list for CAT fanciers!
    Goto <http://members.aol.com/RMOLLISE/index.html>

 

 
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