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  1. #1
    P's Avatar
    P Guest

    Default Eyepieces for a 8" newtonian f/5



    I have a 28mm kellner (2") eyepiece and want to know which eyepieces
    to buy next so that I can view the planets in more detail, ie larger
    image size, more colour etc.

    What would the NG suggest?

    KR's

  2. #2
    Geoff's Avatar
    Geoff Guest

    Default Eyepieces for a 8" newtonian f/5

    On Sun, 07 Mar 2004 10:06:42 +0000, P
    <tonyno_bloody_spam_no@highbury.com> wrote:


    How much are you willing to spend?

  3. #3
    P's Avatar
    P Guest

    Default Eyepieces for a 8" newtonian f/5

    On Sun, 07 Mar 2004 23:51:28 +1100, Geoff <nospam@me.com> wrote:



    I want to buy good quality equipment, but at a reasonable price.

  4. #4
    Jon Isaacs's Avatar
    Jon Isaacs Guest

    Default Eyepieces for a 8" newtonian f/5

    >I want to buy good quality equipment, but at a reasonable price.

    We all do.

    These days most eyepieces, from the $35 plossls on up are good quality.

    The question is what is a reasonable price and how much more than $35 are you
    willing to pay in order to get what are probably increasingly small
    improvements?

    Jon

  5. #5
    Dale2's Avatar
    Dale2 Guest

    Default Eyepieces for a 8" newtonian f/5

    P wrote:



    Well, there is this 31 mm Nagler...




  6. #6
    P's Avatar
    P Guest

    Default Eyepieces for a 8" newtonian f/5

    On Sun, 07 Mar 2004 11:02:57 -0600, Dale2 <dale@dale.com> wrote:


    I understood that it was a good idea to have a range of eyepiece focal
    lengths to allow for detailed viewing of the moon, the planets and DSO
    etc. and also to have a wide view of the sky.

  7. #7
    Jskies187's Avatar
    Jskies187 Guest

    Default Eyepieces for a 8" newtonian f/5

    << I understood that it was a good idea to have a range of eyepiece focal
    lengths to allow for detailed viewing of the moon, the planets and DSO
    etc.>>

    It is. Consider ep and barlow combinations that will get you near 200x for
    average highpower.

    <<... and also to have a wide view of the sky. >>

    Your scope is already capable of modestly wide views.
    Actually, the overwhelming majority of celestial objects are rather small. And
    do not require wide field eyepieces to be observed. However, if you wish for
    well corrected wide field views for your f/5 optics, at all focal lengths, then
    consider more the premium priced wider field eyepieces. That's what they are
    for.

    john

  8. #8
    P's Avatar
    P Guest

    Default Eyepieces for a 8" newtonian f/5

    On 07 Mar 2004 19:20:56 GMT, jskies187@aol.comnotnow (Jskies187)
    wrote:



    Thanks for the reply, John.

    What focal length, type ep should I consider? (2" or 1.25") ?
    Which Barlow should I consider?

    KR's

  9. #9
    Joe S.'s Avatar
    Joe S. Guest

    Default Eyepieces for a 8" newtonian f/5

    I have an Orion XT-8, F5.9, 1200mm focal length. I am an amateur and don't
    understand all this stuff about the relationship between focal length, focal
    ratio, eye relief, and the like.

    Having said that, in the past year, I have bought and sold more eyepieces
    than the law allows and these are the ones I have settled on:

    Televue 2X Barlow
    TV Plossl 32mm -- 38X, 76X with Barlow
    Meade 18mm SuperWide (NOT UltraWide) -- 67X, 133X with Barlow
    Meade 6.7mm UltraWide -- 179X, 358X with Barlow
    Nagler Type 6, 5mm -- 240X, 480X with Barlow (really not usable at this
    power)
    University Optics 4mm orthoscopic -- 300X, 600X with the Barlow (can't use
    this much power)

    I recommend you first purchase a 1.25-inch Televue 2X Barlow.

    Get something in the 18mm range -- either the Meade SuperWide 18mm or a
    University Optics 18mm.
    And, if your budget allows the price of a Nagler, get the Type 6, 5mm. Now,
    with an 18mm, a 5mm, and a Barlow, you have:
    28mm (2-inch), 18mm, 9mm, 5mm -- a nice range of magnification -- assuming
    1200mm focal length scope, you have magnification of 43X, 67X, 134X, and
    240X

    Then, experiment with eyepieces and see what you like.

    Start by picking up one or two University Optics orthoscopics -- get a 4mm
    and a 12.5mm. Try the 12.5 with and without the Barlow -- you may not like
    the orthoscopic eyepiece because they are very short and you need to put
    your eyeball right down in the eyepiece. If you don't mind that, the
    University Optics orthos are real bargains -- under $70.00 new, can pick
    them up on Astromart for around $40-45 -- and they are snapped up fast. If
    you don't like them, you can get most of your investment back on Astromart.

    Watch for a Meade 6.7mm UltraWide -- grab one if you see it for sale and you
    will not regret it.

    Oh, what the hell, just spend every spare penny you have on eyepieces.
    --

    ----
    Joe S.

    "P" <tonyno_bloody_spam_no@highbury.com> wrote in message
    news:a0tl405221e0906h6c0ut95q5c1mmu52vj@4ax.com...



  10. #10
    P's Avatar
    P Guest

    Default Eyepieces for a 8" newtonian f/5

    On Sun, 7 Mar 2004 15:55:27 -0500, "Joe S." <noname@nosuchplace.net>
    wrote:


    Thanks for the reply, Joe. What are objects of choice that you look
    for and has you choice of ep's improved your viewing?

    On looking at planets, which ep's have you found to be the best and
    are able to see detail, colour, cloud decks, rings round Saturn etc.

    Cheers

 

 

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