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  1. #1
    Shneor Sherman's Avatar
    Shneor Sherman Guest

    Default Vic Maris Interview in Sacramento News and Review



    Check out this Vic Maris interview in today's SNR:
    http://www.newsreview.com/issues/sac...28/fifteen.asp

    Clear skies,
    Shneor Sherman

  2. #2
    Chris.B's Avatar
    Chris.B Guest

    Default Vic Maris Interview in Sacramento News and Review

    shneor@my-deja.com (Shneor Sherman) wrote in message news:<9dedb1fb.0308281437.5c1666b3@posting.google. com>...

    Despite the report's mangled English. Vic comes across as a real
    enthusiast. Though I wish he'd concentrate on the job when he's
    drilling. (Don't try this at home chldren!)<g>
    "Geek" is a sad word. Invented by someone who never did anything
    worthy of note and never will. Labels are cheap. They're used by the
    poorest minds on Earth.
    Interesting how an imported lens (V.D.'s words, not mine) can be
    claimed to be made in the USA. Valery never did respond to questions
    on his SV lens 'country of origin' claim, did he? I wonder who's
    fibbing?
    I liked the reference to the Earth as a giant backpack. Imagination
    is what makes this hobby worthwhile. Otherwise we're just playing with
    expensive toys. And arguing over whose is best.

    Chris.B

  3. #3
    Shankar Bhattacharyya's Avatar
    Shankar Bhattacharyya Guest

    Default Vic Maris Interview in Sacramento News and Review

    lal_truckee <lal_truckee@yahoo.com> wrote in
    news:binui0$bh6dc$1@ID-90251.news.uni-berlin.de:


    What he sez.

    Used as an insult "geek" is a cultural statement, in a society which
    has grown sufficiently successful that it has ceased to see obvious
    value in the front-loaded hard work that goes into becoming a geek.

    Americans can live a good middle-class life without taking on much
    formal education and, in particular, the rigours of a quantitative or
    scientific education. This is a good thing, in that it marks a
    successful economic society. Unfortunately, it also allows a self-
    satisfied contempt for those who prefer to take on that front-loaded
    hard work as an alternative to a more carefree approach to early
    youth.

    This is not fundamentally different from Americans not wanting to pick
    strawberries. Both are hard work. People in prosperous societies don't
    have to do much of it to live a reasonably prosperous life. That's
    what a successful economy is about. It may also turn out to be the
    eventual downside.

    I hire people from time to time, for very geeky jobs in my department,
    in a laboratory in the USA. An easy 80% of qualified applicants are
    from India or China, societies which treasure geekiness, societies
    which have economic circumstances which encourage bright, talented
    people to pursue geek educations not only as a matter of cultural
    preference but also as a matter of pursuing the very possibility of a
    middle-class life. When I next hire an employee I will be looking to
    fill a relatively high-level geek job, so the person can operate with
    very little oversight from me. The best candidate will very likely be
    from somewhere other than the US. The US simply does not produce
    enough geeks any more.

    In India there is no word equivalent to "geek". The nearest is
    "bright". If one is sufficiently good at that sort of thing the word
    might be "brilliant". We just don't have this contempt for technical
    competence.

    Sometimes, as kids, we geeks would get called "bookworms". That did
    not bother us in the least. It often came from the athletes. It was,
    nevertheless, our social duty to see that they got through to the next
    class - it was automatically our responsibility to do that for the
    rest of our classmates, athletes or not. Certainly we wished we had
    their athletic skills. For us that mattered on the playground, between
    5 and 7pm. However, for them our skills mattered differently, for age
    15-65 or so. We were secure in our status. We were probably pains
    about it, too.

    - Shankar

  4. #4
    Stephen Pitt's Avatar
    Stephen Pitt Guest

    Default Vic Maris Interview in Sacramento News and Review

    "Dennis Woos" <dpwoos@gmavt.net> wrote in message
    news:vlmojkfktauufd@corp.supernews.com




    If that means diluting a Republicanized, dumbed down, uncreative,
    reactive, myth fearing population who can't connect dots with thinking
    progressives, then open the floodgates, please. But hurry, we need a
    huge influx before the next general election.

    Stephen Pitt : http://www.light-to-dark.com


    --
    Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG

 

 

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